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Esteemed Advisor
sw363535
Posts: 4,244
Registered: ‎07-18-2011
0

Re: Not Looking Good

Excellent

sw
Veteran Contributor
chipster22
Posts: 74
Registered: ‎10-08-2010
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Re: Not Looking Good

In NW Ohio the ground is saturated.  We are still a month away from normal corn planting time, but last year was very wet so that is sticking in my mind.  Harvest was such a challenge that some corn and beans are still in the field.

 

Believe it or not, I saw a Gleaner taking out soybeans just east of Bowling Green, Ohio yesterday (March 10th).  Fields nearby had water standing in pockets.  The ground never froze for very long around here to hold a combine over this winter.

Esteemed Advisor
sw363535
Posts: 4,244
Registered: ‎07-18-2011
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Re: Not Looking Good

The extremes of this weather pattern are creating crop insurance necessity is some areas.

At least it seems that way to me. I hope Ohio and sw both see some moderation to this pattern. We have been in it for a long time now.

sw
Senior Contributor
vrbuck
Posts: 610
Registered: ‎05-13-2010
0

Re: Not Looking Good

Not to worry niaf plant your crop in dust and your bin will bust. Been a long time since we rammed a crop in the ground with no delays. Think of all the extra acres going to corn. We may have 20 dollar beans and three dollar corn.
Veteran Advisor
Mizzou_Tiger
Posts: 2,200
Registered: ‎11-02-2010
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Re: Not Looking Good

Vr, 164 or 14 challenge, funny how that works............vr have you ever planted a corn or soya crop?????........again 164 or 14 challenge...........
Frequent Contributor
ISUMan
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎05-13-2010
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Re: Not Looking Good

We planted last year in some of the best conditions we've ever seen.  Planting in the dust is the best possible start but it's only the 1st day of a plants life.  Any yield guesses at this point are inconsequential IMO.  Once we hit April 1 and get a handle on how early planting progress will shape up then one can start to speculate on yield potential.  I do however think soybeans are taking away a few corn acres which is what we need to generate competition for acres.  

Frequent Contributor
Threadkiller
Posts: 42
Registered: ‎07-30-2011
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Re: Not Looking Good

In my experience planting in dust works great, if you get timely spring rains, and have adequate subsoil moisture.  I have heard some major corn growing areas are fairly low on subsoil moisture....can we make a bin buster crop without a wetter than average summer?   hmm.....  

Esteemed Advisor
Hobbyfarmer
Posts: 3,648
Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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Re: Not Looking Good

I think it is still too early to cry "oh woe is me".

 

Yes it is drier than it has been for a few years.

 

Friday I went from here in southern Iowa to tour an ethanol plant at Fairmont, Iowa ...I have never seen so many sq miles (equiv) of ground pattern tilled. From I35 east on hwy 20 to Waterloo just field after field of pattern tile. I got it figured they want it a little drier than it has been.

 

The biggest unknown that will be an equally big deternining thing to yield will be temperature. It makes a big difference wheather it is in the high eighties or high nineties.

 

Water is dripping off of my roof as I type this... Glad I got the one bottom field burned off yesterday afternoon/night that wasn't worked last fall due to the fact it was a late fall harvest due to the drago type winds that caused almost all the corn to be combined one way. and the rain events we had. Our tile lines are running this spring.

 

This is the first year in many that I will be decreasing acres due to the fact they need seeded down to hay for a few years. Many of these old Southern Iowa hills can not sustain the onslaught of $6 CORN AND $11+ BEANS.

60% of the time, it works every time.

"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and promoted by mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a piece of dung by the clean end."
Veteran Advisor
Mizzou_Tiger
Posts: 2,200
Registered: ‎11-02-2010
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Re: Not Looking Good

hobby, you bring up a point in your post, but didnt hit on it.......

 

when you look at Iowa and divide it E vs W..........and take historic precip averages into account.........typically the E half has had a nice balance of moisture, and the W half can struggle, much like the plain states..........however the last several years annual precip has increased which has helped the W and probably made for some wet feet in the E..........ergo more tiling...........however many tiles are barely running or not running at all.............

 

now dont get me wrong, a dry spring with a few timely rains can be very beneficial to get a corn crop going........a little stress in May and June can really push those roots down so it finds that profile.............so here in lies another issue..........if the profile truly does account for nearly half of a crops moisture needs...........and many profiles are weak or flat dry......................we have to have timely and fairly large rain events in July............that or we have to get the profile charged before July...........which means we have to have some heavy rain events that soak in right in the middle of planting and seedling development..........we know thats not good as it leaches out N and makes for shallow roots and possible stand losses............

 

so we either need to get some major soakers in the next 4-6 weeks, which at this point looks unlikely...........or we need timely July rains that are widespread and soaking...........Mid-May thru June flooding rains do more harm than good even if it is recharging a profile..............

 

you are right, yield is a long ways off from being determined............but here we set again with this idea of needing perfect weather across every acre, sound familiar............the odds are stacked against that no matter how hard we wanna try and beat the weather..........

 

there is a big difference between having a profile to fall back on when things get hot and dry in July..........versus not having a profile at all............last year probably would have been an even bigger disaster for some if it wasnt for a decent profile going into mid and late July...........

Frequent Contributor
Threadkiller
Posts: 42
Registered: ‎07-30-2011
0

Re: Not Looking Good

i don't think anyone was crying woe is me; myself,  and i'm guessing the other posters also, were responding to the bin-busting idea.   Just  stating conditions are not ideal, and as Mizzou Tiger detailed, alot of good timing with summer rains will need to occur if the dry areas don't get some good soakers before planting begins.