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Honored Advisor
Posts: 4,614
Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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Still Dry out there...

[ Edited ]

California cuts off water to agencies serving millions amid drought

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Amid severe drought conditions, California officials announced Friday they won't send any water from the state's vast reservoir system to local agencies beginning this spring, an unprecedented move that affects drinking water supplies for 25 million people and irrigation for 1 million acres of farmland.

The announcement marks the first time in the 54-year history of the State Water Project that such an action has been taken, but it does not mean that every farm field will turn to dust and every city tap will run dry.

The 29 agencies that draw from the state's water-delivery system have other sources, although those also have been hard-hit by the drought.

Many farmers in California's Central Valley, one of the most productive agricultural regions in the country, also draw water from a separate system of federally run reservoirs and canals, but that system also will deliver just a fraction of its normal water allotment this year.

The announcement affects water deliveries planned to begin this spring, and the allotment could increase if weather patterns change and send more storms into the state.

Nevertheless, Friday's announcement puts an exclamation point on California's water shortage, which has been building during three years of below-normal rain and snow.

"This is the most serious drought we've faced in modern times," said Felicia Marcus, chairwoman of the State Water Resources Control Board. "We need to conserve what little we have to use later in the year, or even in future years."

State Department of Water Resources Director Mark Cowin said there simply is not enough water in the system to meet the needs of farmers, cities and the conservation efforts that are intended to save dwindling populations of salmon and other fish throughout Northern California.

For perspective, California would have to experience heavy rain and snowfall every other day from now until May to get the state back to its average annual precipitation totals, according to the Department of Water Resources.

"These actions will protect us all in the long run," Cowin said during a news conference that included numerous state and federal officials, including those from wildlife and agricultural agencies.

Friday's announcement came after Gov. Jerry Brown's official drought declaration in mid-January, a decision that cleared the way for state and federal agencies to coordinate efforts to preserve water and send it where it is needed most. The governor urged Californians to reduce their water use by 20 percent.  (20% ???? get real here)

It also reflects the severity of the dry conditions in the nation's most populous state. Officials say 2013 was the state's driest calendar year since records started being kept, and this year is heading in the same direction.

A snow survey on Thursday in the Sierra Nevada, one of the state's key water sources, found the water content in the meager snowpack is just 12 percent of normal. Reservoirs are lower than they were at the same time in 1977, which is one of the two previous driest water years on record.

State officials say 17 rural communities are in danger of a severe water shortage within four months. Wells are running dry or reservoirs are nearly empty in some communities. Others have long-running problems that predate the drought.

The timing for of Friday's historic announcement was important: State water officials typically announce they are raising the water allotment on Feb. 1, but this year's winter has been so dry they wanted to ensure they could keep the remaining water behind the dams. The announcement also will give farmers more time to determine what crops they will plant this year and in what quantities.

Farmers and ranchers throughout the state already have felt the drought's impact, tearing out orchards, fallowing fields and trucking in alfalfa to feed cattle on withered range land.

Without deliveries of surface water, farmers and other water users often turn to pumping from underground aquifers. The state has no role in regulating such pumping.

"A zero allocation is catastrophic and woefully inadequate for Kern County residents, farms and businesses," Ted Page, president the Kern County Water Agency's board, said in a statement. "While many areas of the county will continue to rely on ground water to make up at least part of the difference, some areas have exhausted their supply."

Groundwater levels already have been stressed, after pumping accelerated during the dry winter in 2008 and 2009.

"The challenge is that in last drought we drew down groundwater resources and never allowed them to recover," said Heather Cooley, water program co-director for the Pacific Institute, a water policy think tank in Oakland. "We're seeing long term, ongoing declining groundwater levels, and that's a major problem."

Many towns and cities already have ordered severe cutbacks in water use.

With some rivers reduced to a trickle, fish populations also are being affected. Eggs in salmon-spawning beds of the American River near Sacramento were sacrificed after upstream releases from Folsom Dam were severely cut back.

The drought is highlighting the traditional tensions between groups that claim the state's limited water for their own priorities — farmers, city residents and conservationists.

Chuck Bonham, director of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, urged everyone to come together during the crisis.

"This is not about picking between delta smelt and long-fin smelt and chinook salmon, and it's not about picking between fish and farms or people and the environment," he said. "It is about really hard decisions on a real-time basis where we may have to accept some impact now to avoid much greater impact later."

 

 

OK why the pictures of Las Vegas on a California story? Why not pictures of a Palm Springs golf course? 20% reduction isn't going to come close to getting them through.

 

I was out there in the late 70's and their idea of water conservation was to not give you a glass of water at a restaurant until you asked for it, then it came in a juice glass.  

Senior Advisor
Posts: 4,408
Registered: ‎06-19-2011
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Re: Still Dry out there...

Our Central Kansas drought just broke, received 1/2" of snow last night. Talk about a game changer.
Honored Advisor
Posts: 4,614
Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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Re: Still Dry out there...

I'm expecting major flooding here when this 1 1/2 inches of light fluffy stuff we got last night melts next month.

Honored Advisor
Posts: 5,744
Registered: ‎07-18-2011
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Re: Still Dry out there...

[ Edited ]

A state that once was the 5th largest agriculture producer in the world if it were a country.  Will cut production in 2014.

 

No one will care until the wine gets rationed, but this is a big story.  That weather moves east.  

Honored Advisor
Posts: 4,614
Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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Re: Still Dry out there...

[ Edited ]

cal snow pac.jpg

This is what is happening (or not happening)

 

California/Nevada snow pack pictures  last year ... this year.

Honored Advisor
Posts: 4,614
Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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Re: Still Dry out there...

SW: I think it has moved East. It seems to be everything West of I35 clear to the above mentioned area.  Colorado does not have the snow pack to fix the low water levels in Lake Powell and Lake Mead.

Honored Advisor
Posts: 5,744
Registered: ‎07-18-2011
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Re: Still Dry out there...

You were profetic when you said sw should come get his weather.  You have had our wind and skiffy snows ever since.  

This winters weather has been skewed east.  The moisture has been pushing to the east coast and everything as you say from !-35 west is dry for several weeks now.  The dry line is working east and the west side of it has not reached California yet.  If that dry system takes 6 months to cross the US it looks worse that 2012.  That 2011 texas system was small compared to this one and it moved very slow ----- took over a year to cross texas.

 

Colorado has been several years since it has seen good snow pack.  When was the last time mountain passes were closed by snow pack for an extended period of time ------- ie more than a day or two.??  That is the lake powell / Mead problem.

 

The Pacific should always fill the sierra's  ----------------- it is a historic event if it doesn't ------ as you are noting.

 

My uncle on the San Juaqin and I have been comparing for years ------- January/February  is their wettest months and it often fortells our spring in the southern plains.

Advisor
Posts: 1,181
Registered: ‎06-30-2012
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Re: Still Dry out there...

I don't know that 1/2" or 1 1/2" is going to give you guys a lot of water.

I got like 3-4 ft of snow... Some peeps are in states of emergency cause of snow... Mi, wi, Ohio, parts of Ontario. 20" more tonight... If I fall through snow that I walk over I may not get out in spots.

I've spent more than a day pushing snow getting straw for people. We have had record building collapses due to snow, and most insurance does not cover.

If we get everything melting at once there will be a flood... We already had a thaw and it just packed things: too much snow. If a.com didn't have restrictions on file sizes I'd upload all of the fields of corn that are under snow.
Senior Advisor
Posts: 2,087
Registered: ‎10-17-2012
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Re: Still Dry out there...

As long as the Gulf don't dry up -- we should be OK here .  And you guys don't try and steal it Smiley Happy

Veteran Advisor
Posts: 794
Registered: ‎05-20-2010
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Re: Still Dry out there...

sw...the weather systems retrograde to the west, not to the east. They are in the point of the wave that the midwest was in during 2012. So, it probably should be dry. Of course it is alot more complicated than that, but the systems move east to west, not west to east.