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Senior Contributor
highyields
Posts: 776
Registered: ‎06-04-2010
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abandoned acres

Was it on this site where I read about abandone acres in Northern Iowa last summer,  somewhere I read that someone flew over with an airplane and saw acres and acres of bare fields?    Was this all not true?   

Community Manager
marketeye
Posts: 3,058
Registered: ‎05-03-2010
0

Re: abandoned acres

highyields,

 

For confirmation on this, I share with you this story. In southern Minnesota, there are whole counties that didn't get any crops planted. But, don't let that get in the way of understanding that the better-than-expected yields out of central and eastern Iowa and central and western Illinois are making up for other area's losses. Stay tuned, next Friday's USDA Crop Production Report will have more to say about this.

 

Mike

Veteran Advisor
BA Deere
Posts: 7,988
Registered: ‎05-13-2010
0

Re: abandoned acres

Its absolutely true, Highyields, but we apparently don't matter and "pigs can fly" as I'm told. You get north of Wells Mn and stuff west of say Fairmont Mn and its golden,, maybe we ain't as important as we think we are IDK.
Senior Contributor
highyields
Posts: 776
Registered: ‎06-04-2010
0

Re: abandoned acres

Better then expected yields. I guess I have a hard time understanding that.  If you go out after the corn ear has gone to blister stage you can count the rows and get a better good idea of what your top end yield might be.   And with the cool temps during pollination and kernel fill there shouldn't be any surprises,  but to brag is to be a farmer,,,

 

 

Thanks for the confirmation,  its interesting that the markets having totally forgotten that,,  The other acres in the rest of the country have made up for the difference?  to me thats amazing southern minnestoa is a really good corn producing area from what I've been told.  

 

 

Thanks again,,,

 

Veteran Advisor
jennys_mn
Posts: 1,175
Registered: ‎07-19-2010
0

Re: abandoned acres

The abandoned acres didn't stop with MN. And we all know how much a zero yield in spots in a field brings down the overall average. In light of that, it is amazing to see what we supposedly produced this year. One poster on this site mentioned lack of corn piles around. Heck, last year one elevator here piled corn in an auction lot outside of town. Our elevator isn't full - far from it - and from what the manager is saying, other elevators are saying the same. Maybe we just built a lot of on farm storage, or that storage was really empty this last year. The point for me, and the only figure in my book that is really important, is carry out. Is it 2 bbl, 1.5 bbl? Or when we get to next fall, is out carry out going to end up being minimal after all.

I've seen this scenario before. I don't remember what year it was. I'd have to look back on some records. But we had this huge crop. We were into LDP's in the fall, by mid summer, prices shot up suddenly to $6.00. Local elevators were calling me to see if I had any corn. I had sold long before that. And I just suspect, we may see this same thing play out this year.

Low prices cure low prices. World wide, we use everything we produce. World population is not getting smaller by any means. What does get smaller every year is our finite resources to grow this huge crop. Oil, fertilizer, these don't materialize out of thin air. Phosphorous production is forecast to peak in 2030. We keep pushing back the peak oil date. Yet our population continues to grow exponentially. We had better not have seen peak corn. A day of reckoning for food reserves is probably coming for someone reading this post today. We use resources on this planet like there is no tomorrow. It does make one wonder where will it all end?

Jen
Community Manager
marketeye
Posts: 3,058
Registered: ‎05-03-2010
0

Re: abandoned acres

highyields,

 

I've traveled to these areas I speak of. I've talked to farmers, standing right in the cornfield that they are harvesting, and even watched the monitors in a few cases. This year's growing weather just did not indicate the types of yields that the monitors are showing. I know, 'better than expected' is the most overused phrase of 2013. And again, Minnesota's ground is good. But, we're talking about major producing areas of Illinois and Iowa that are just doing better.

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

Veteran Contributor
capinegro3901115
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎08-29-2013
0

Re: abandoned acres

Let's roll back the clock here. First wet spring, planting delays and PP acres. Then too cool, we need heat units. Next hot and dry. Let's not forget early frost forecast and how late the crops are. Now comes the USDA report on the 8th. Back to harvested acres and abandoned acres. This crop was killed off how many times this season. Combines rolling and some are still in denial. This crop cant be. Stay tune Peak Corn

 

Maybe this has happen to yourself. Thinking you have 60% of corn sold but now your yields are "better than expected", it turns out your only priced 45%. Hmmmmmm, head winds wont go away. Just hope there are selling ops with some 20-30 cent rallies in the cards.

Senior Contributor
highyields
Posts: 776
Registered: ‎06-04-2010
0

Re: abandoned acres

not really in denial more of how the heck did this get missed...