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Advisor
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Re: "The next American Farm Bust is Upon Us" WSJ

What did anyone expect after the gubmint stretched the cost structure totally out of whack?

Advisor
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Re: "The next American Farm Bust is Upon Us" WSJ

I dont think the "gubmint" had anything to do with land cost.  Farmers did that to themselves

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Advisor
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Re: "The next American Farm Bust is Upon Us" WSJ

Farmers would have done less of it to themselves had ethanol and commodity financialization policies both been crafted more wisely.

 

Also if the gubmint hadn't pretty much quit enforcing anything along the anti-trust lines in the last 20 years- as far as input oligopolies go.

 

Although the way the market actually works is that if the genetics, fertilizer and equipment oligopolies weren't robbing you blind then the landlords would take all of it anyway as long as somebody is willing to loan the money to pay it (and they will be, for a while).

 

Which is why we should have stuck with the toughlove of F2F and kept the gubmint out of farming.

 

A matter where, curiously, even the most ardent anti-gubmint radicals tend to disagree if they happen to be farmers.

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holding interest down and printing money to maintain a comfort level is a pretty big contributor.

Regulating small business out of existance while giving favors to the large international political contributors.(labor laws & Court liability)

Forcing US business to compete globally with countries where regulation is non existant. -- Only promised.

Economically forcing mergers to a level of no competition. (seed, fertilizer, & Equipment companies to farms themselves)

 

Large international corps are the chosen survivers for the future global economy,, and we are going to live with the idiocy and ego of the gubmt of the last 30 years for a long time even if we do referbish its foolishness.

 

Technology has made us all feel like super heros.  Especially politicians.  And farmers who think they can drive a straight row......From the office.

 

The sad part is the direction of the US and globalization is spinning rapidly toward loss of need for 60% of the worlds population.  

If we are not needed to produce food or manufacture goods or mine things, where do most of us stand with those with political power.

 

That picture without a cab or an operator should be very difficult to look at.......

 

 

 

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Thanks for posting the other link Bruce.... It is a good article......

 

But the politically correctness of SF wants to print Blue Sky articles...... it will not make it here, no matter how true it is.

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Re: "The next American Farm Bust is Upon Us" WSJ

Would you mind sharing which 2 articles you are referring to? I would like to read them in comparison.

 

Thank you kindly!

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Hardy, can't believe you are praising f2f.

 

Compared to what was before it 

It was what untied my hands and allowed me to make better rotation and crop management choices.

 

I do wonder what the farming landscape would look like without the big E.

 

$3 corn was as rare as hens teeth before it. My guess is we would be farther along on the mega farm road than we are now.

 

That period of low $2 corn and $6 beans would have decimated half of those still farming today if E and a drought hadn't happened in tandem.

 

Problem was the drought was selective, and75% of the recipients of the good crops at great prices spent it and an additional three years of great prices (that didn't happen) in an euphoric daze.

 

The problem this time is we have no adequate young person base to take over, and even a smaller base of young people with thinking skills able to traverse all the landmines placed by gov't, and big seed etc.

 

Many many things out here are only expenses not necessities, straight computer controlled planters at $3 corn are a loss leader.

 

Some things are better left at the store till there is cash in the savings account, not the loan dept.

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Re: "The next American Farm Bust is Upon Us" WSJ

Somebody said 30 years. A few more but close enough.

 

Condensing these comments into a nutshell re: "the government", the primary function of government as we have experienced over that period is in the total non-regulation,  un-regulation, unbriddling as it were, of all capitalism.  

 

That, as you say, creates a huge paradox for those convinced that they need to go along with the arbitrors of that out of the belief that all of their "other" abstract values are being respected and represented.

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Re: "The next American Farm Bust is Upon Us" WSJ

Of course when an article starts with the total conceit that "there are 2 million farms in the US" the first thing one needs to do is squat down on the old white porcelain American Standard and then use the offending article to clean your butt afterwards.

 

Probably closer to 1-200K that matter from an economic view. The horse left the barn a long time ago as far as this really affecting a whole lotta people.

 

Over and done with but the basic neoliberal concept was that people were going to leave their semi-subsistence farm lives and go work in manufacturing and become "consumers".

 

Once again, sick and tired of reading something from some a-hole who drives into a rural town to do an article and assumes that because there are a lot of pickups there must be a lot of farmers or that the economic and social desperation must be on account of the loss of "manufacturing".