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Hobbyfarmer
Posts: 3,640
Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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this is our # 1 customer

Number of dead pigs mysteriously found in Shanghai rivers rises to over 16,000

  • ChinaDeadPigsWorkers.JPG

    March 21, 2013: Health workers lower dead pigs into a processing pit, where the carcasses will be fermented into organic fertilizers, at a hog farm in Zhuji city, in eastern China’s Zhejiang province. (AP)

     

The number of dead pigs recovered in the last two weeks from rivers that supply water to Shanghai has risen to more than 16,000.

 

The government in China's financial hub said Thursday that 10,570 carcasses have been pulled from its Huangpu river. That is in addition to 5,528 pigs plucked from upstream tributaries in the Jiaxing area of Zhejiang province.

 

Authorities give daily updates assuring the public that tests show Shanghai's water is safe, but no official has given any full explanation about the massive dumping of pig carcasses.

 

Hog farmers have told state media that the dumping of swine carcasses is rising because police have started cracking down on the illicit sale of pork products made from dead, diseased pigs.

 

The state-controlled Southern Weekly newspaper, citing court documents, said three men were sentenced to life prison in Jiaxing last November for procuring dead pigs to sell their meat. It says the men and their group purchased and slaughtered 77,000 dead pigs in a period of more than two years.

 

Local officials also told Southern Weekly that the city lacks enough facilities to properly dispose of dead pigs. Hog farming is a major business in Jiaxing.



 

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c-x-1
Posts: 3,070
Registered: ‎06-26-2012
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Re: this is our # 1 customer

You have the sweet & soul polk? YUMMY.....one of oul favolite dishes!!!......especiarry when aged just pelfectry.......

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captianD
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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Re: this is our # 1 customer

Sounds more sour than sweet.
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kraft-t
Posts: 10,712
Registered: ‎05-10-2010
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Re: this is our # 1 customer

breathe through your mouth. It tastes better than it smells!

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jput
Posts: 1,108
Registered: ‎02-05-2013
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Re: this is our # 1 customer

China currently owns over 7% of U.S. federal debt via U.S. treasury securities. If China were to decide to dump those treasuries, it would greatly increase the burden of servicing U.S. debt. This could lead to a currency crisis forcing the U.S. to raise interest rates. Higher interest rates and higher risk for borrowers will potentially make it difficult for the U.S. to find creditors and will create the conditions for a recession.

Additionally, statements made by numerous Chinese officials have expressed support for the use of U.S. debt ownership as a weapon. Statements such as a senior editor of the state-run media outlet China's People's Daily who wrote, "now is the time for China to use its 'financial weapon' to teach the United States a lesson if it moves forward with a plan to sale arms to Taiwan." In addition, according to China Times, the country's central bank deputy governor Yi Gang announced, "China is fully prepared for a looming currency war should it, though 'avoidable,' really happen."

Despite statements such as these, most analysis of U.S.-China policy, including reports from the U.S.-China Business Council (UCBC) as well as a report issued in July 2012 by former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, argue that the threat of using large holdings of U.S. debt for political advantage is nothing more than hot air.

The conventional wisdom is that China would never dump U.S. securities because an abrupt movement out of U.S. securities would be detrimental to both China and the United States. It would not be rational for China to take huge losses because they would be harming themselves.

The problem with the conventional wisdom is that it leaves several questions unanswered, such as: what if China is not rational? Alternatively, what if the potential damage to the Chinese economy is a calculated harm, which will serve an ultimate end goal?

China has been growing their financial sector but not for reasons of improving the livelihood of their citizenry. The growth in their financial sector has had little effect on the country's GDP, which they have covered by artificially inflating their GDP growth to a reported 7.8% when in actuality, economic indicators indicate it to be closer to 3-4%.

China has pumped extensive liquidity into their internal currency markets and it is easy to assume that the growth of their currencies' liquidity is a step toward gaining international reserve status for the Yuan. This currency liquidity requires China to have an export market to develop for the Yuan. Over the past few decades, China has become a global manufacturing hub with a near-monopoly on numerous key rare earth resources, China is positioning itself as the key global manufacturing and trade hub for an array of components and finished goods. The country now produces 20% of global manufacturing output, rendering the rest of the world dependent on the flow of goods out of China.The icing on the cake of being the hub of manufacturing and trade would be to have the Chinese Yuan as the world's reserve currency.

At present, the global financial system is centered on the U.S. dollar. Countries from around the world keep huge reserves of our currency lying around for the sake of international trade. This reserve currency status that the dollar possesses allows the U.S. to sustain an assertive foreign policy. If the dollar were to cease being the global reserve currency, the U.S. government will be much weaker internationally. In addition, the country will have a much harder time financing our debt, leading an already difficult to manage debt impossible to maintain and collapsing our economy.

It is important to note that China is not a capitalist nation. Capitalist nations have thriving open markets and numerous freedoms such as an open internet. The people of China do not have the luxury of capitalism; they have a repressive communist government interested in power.

China's power grab does not involve only financial markets. The Chinese military has been growing at exorbitant rates over the past few years. Not only does China have a large nuclear stockpile and a growing drone program, the growth of their naval fleet through the development of the aircraft carrier Liaoning -- along with several more planned in the future -- will help solidify their status as a superpower. An aircraft carrier will allow China to deploy troops and aircraft to regions around the world.

The Chinese People's Liberation Army has been linked to hacking groups that are seeking the ability to sabotage power grids and steal intellectual property at alarming rates. Chinese hackers have stolen terabytes of data from U.S. corporations involved in the United State's critical infrastructure.

Not only is China employing a highly antagonistic posture towards America. Their actions have grown more aggressive toward their neighbors over the past several years. These activities continuously test America's commitment to its Asian allies.

China has grown increasingly belligerent towards Japan both militarily as well as through their financial markets thanks to a longstanding dispute over the contested Senkakus Islands in the East China Sea.

Additionally, China, which regards Taiwan as a renegade province, has threatened to use nuclear weapons in response to Taiwan's interests in autonomy. This makes China the only country with nuclear capabilities to threaten to use the bomb against people and territories they consider their own.

When one looks at their trajectory, it is not hard to conclude that China's long-term goal is to replace the U.S. as the world's sole superpower. While they have a lot to lose by reverting to financial terrorism and dumping the dollar, they may feel that they will come out on top after toppling the dollar.

With a weakened America, and the international community relying on the Yuan as a reserve currency, it is not hard to imagine China making good on their belligerence towards their neighbors. After island hopping across Asia and the Pacific, it would only be a matter of time before we start seeing the Chinese navy patrolling around Europe, Africa, and America.

Despite statements made by various analysts, there is a real threat that China will dump U.S. debt. The theory that they will not because it would hurt their economy is predicated on the idea that China is a rational actor looking for financial growth. However, any country that manipulates and lies to prop up their financial markets; considers financial terrorism as a viable option for getting what they want; and threaten their neighbors as well as their own people with nuclear weapons is not a rational actor that belongs in the category of "superpower." Our growing national debt is a danger in and of itself, but giving China the ability to flex its muscles by means of that debt is something that should not be allowed to happen.

 

Frequent Contributor
JacobMcCandless
Posts: 34
Registered: ‎11-08-2012
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Re: this is our # 1 customer

If I had 16000 pigs and no time to waste, I would chuck the carcusses into 1/4 weight sand and high potassium and phosphate solution.  I would add bromelain and preferably pineapple.  After adding 4x water, some sort of colesterol ditch would then be needed to prevent the bacony residue.  After 5 days of ample ferment, this could then be spread liberally as a fertilizer on a southern fallow field.  Being springish I would wait until at least the second week of April.

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kraft-t
Posts: 10,712
Registered: ‎05-10-2010
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Re: what does that mean

China dumping our debt? Do you mean selling our bonds to someone else? How does that damage us. We then sell bonds to someone else. Maybe even american savers. Perhaps even more than 1 %. I actually think there are alot of savers, particularly seniors, that would like a little better return on their savings.

 

AS it is with Fed manipulation of money supply aka interest rates, it's a wonder any one would buy US securities?  I don't care if China buys our securities or saudi arabia or anyone else and no it wouldn't hurt if interest rates were higher.

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k-289
Posts: 1,715
Registered: ‎05-13-2010
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Re: what does that mean

BTO  at  it's  finest  hour  - as far as 7% of our debt we could pay that off with the trade deficit we are running each month ---

Senior Contributor
jput
Posts: 1,108
Registered: ‎02-05-2013
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Re: what does that mean

True inflation is not reported by our govt.    But it is reflected on the supermarket and store shelves in higher prices.   It is there at the gas and diesel fillup of people's vehicles,  and semi-tractors.   Getting 1-2% return on investment doesn't keep up with inflation,  you don't even break even. 

 

The Chi-coms are major US grains customers,  but they're not our friends.   Can't be with their govt as it is.   And they're serious about staying in power, the elites don't care about the regular Chinese people.    This pig die off is an opportunity to export meat to China but in the long haul,  Chi-com priorities are buying grain,  feeding it there,  not importing meat.

 

 

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JCCWIS
Posts: 228
Registered: ‎11-13-2012
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Re: what does that mean

Now lets think about this...........Chi-com.......anti-govn't    ..............high gas diesel fuel prices.........Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......jput = glow plug ???????????????????????

 

  John