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About the Author
  • Jennifer is a self proclaimed country girl born and raised in Northern California. After joining social media, Jenny met a farmer from North Dakota. She followed her heart all the way to the rural prairies of ND where she is now married to that farmer. Besides spending time with her farmer, Jenny can be found with a camera in hand capturing the world around her, loves the challenges of bringing culture to the North Dakota prairie through a variety of culinary creations, and using her interior design degree to flip their bachelor pad into a home. All of this and more can be found on her photography blog: jldphotographblog.com.
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1. Lack of Three Lane Highways. 

In fact most of our roads look like the photo above. I don't know about you but since I have moved to rural America, three lane freeways terrify me. I used to be this awesome city driver.. I drove in SAN FRANCISCO! Any of you who have been there know what I am talking about.. Anyway, there is a stretch of three lane highway in Fargo and every time I drive it, I find myself clutching the steering wheel a little tighter than normal and breathing heavier than I usually do. Oh and the only traffic jam you will find yourself in rurally is usually a tractor or combine on the road! 

 

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2. Getting Across Town Takes... Maybe 5 Minutes. 

Unless I am heading to the farm, I can leave my house about 5 minutes before I need to go anywhere. Getting across "town" takes not even that long because town is all but 5-6 blocks. In fact, I can WALK to the grocery store, hardware store, bar, and post office if I needed to. No more of that getting ready and leaving the house 20 minutes or sometimes an hour before you need to. 

 

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3. Rememnants of the Previous Generations

No matter where you go in small town America, you are bound to find remnants of the older generation. Old homes, old barns, old grain elevators, old businesses. You will find this in big cities as well, but often times those things are torn down to make room for the new. Honestly, is there anything better than that iconic photo of an old red barn on a grassy hill?

 

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4. Peace and Quiet 

There's a certain peace and quiet in the evenings when people are inside and no nightlife is going on that happens in small town America. In fact, even when I run to the grocery store at 7 p.m., there are usually no cars on Main Street. I love taking runs through town when the sun is just about to go down. There's no traffic, it's nice and cool, and rarely anyone is outside. It's so quiet and peaceful. 

 

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5. Everyone Waves to You or Says Hi. 

Whether you know the person or not, you wave. It's the unofficial rules of rural living. Same goes for seeing someone in the grocery store or on the street. This was new to me when I first moved to rural America as I had always been weary of saying HI to people I didn't know. But now I can flash a smile and wave hi as I drive by with the best of them. And honestly, I wouldn't have it any other way. Now I find myself when I travel driving past someone and waving my hand like a crazy person... 

 

These are just five of the many reasons I love where I live. I wouldn't trade rural or small town life for anything now. Sure I miss my Starbucks, boutique clothing stores, and fancy food... But that just makes it even more special when I do get to enjoy those luxuries in life. 

 

What are your favorite things about rural life? 

The Power of Agriculture

by Jennifer_Dewey on ‎05-01-2014 11:34 AM

These are just a few of the many stories shared on social media about the love, kindness, and real power of when people come together... The power of agriculture isn't in the numbers, the machinery, the crops, or the acres... the power of Agriculture is in the people.

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