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As usual, the week brought with it a couple of, shall we say, "interesting" claims about poultry circulating in mainstream and social media outlets. This is no surprise, of course. It seems like those of us in agriculture could find some piece of misinformation nearly every day to refute.

 

On Friday evening, I was enjoying some downtime at home after a very busy week the office. While my husband was watching something on the History Channel, I was glancing through the latest issue of Redbook magazine, a popular women's magazine. All was going along just fine - typical fashion, recipes and exercise tips - until a headline caught my eye: "Food Labels, Demystified."  Right below it was a paragraph about cage-free and free-range eggs, along with a drawing a chicken.

 

While I'm all for clarifying what cage-free and free-range actually mean, it was the later part of the paragraph that practically made steam come out of my ears: " ... neither guarantees that the birds actually went outside or were fed a diet free of pesticides and antibiotics."

 

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Pesticides fed to chickens?  Think about that for a moment. What does that even mean?

 

If I had to guess, I'd say the writer is referencing - albeit in a completely misleading way - the use of pesticides by farmers who raise corn and soybeans, which are the mainstays of a laying hen's diet. However, this simplistic statement makes the dangerous assumption that consumers should be worried about this.

 

They should not. Decades of scientific research of conventionally-raised corn and soybeans - including GMO varieties - backs me up on this. Plus, I can tell from my own personal experience that tons of research on poultry diets - and finding the optimal nutrition for birds - is happening every, single day. The farmers I work with spend a lot of time learning about bird nutrition and fine-tuning feed rations for their flocks because that, in turn, leads to a healthy, safe product for consumers.

 

And as a farmer friend of mine ( who has both conventional and organic production on her farm) so eloquently stated to me about this Redbook blurb when I posted it on Facebook: Labeling regarding health claims is regulated by the federal governments for both organic or conventional foods so everyone is playing by the same rules.

 

Hands down no question, I see every day that the health of the birds and making sure consumers are getting a safe product are the top priorities for farmers.

 

The problem is, of course, that most readers of Redbook have no knowledge of farming and only see the scary word "PESTICIDE" glaring out at them. It all comes down to a poorly written blurb that doesn't demystify a label, but rather further muddies the water and creates a sense of mistrust in farmers.

 

Also this past week, a friend of mine shared a link to a Change.org petition to "Stop Boiling Animals Alive!" Basically, the person who posted the petition wrote, "The Humane Methods of Slaughter Act is enforced by the USDA, but they decided it's acceptable to exclude chickens and turkeys—as if they're inanimate objects!"

 

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Over 239,000 people have signed the petition - again, scary-sounding title so perfectly incites fear and mistrust - to date, but I think it's a safe assumption that most don't know the true details behind this. While it is true that Humane Methods of Slaughter Act does not apply to poultry, it is absolutely NOT true that poultry processing goes unregulated by USDA. That's just a completely erroneous claim and a dangerous statement to make.

 

USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has a set of guidelines for humane poultry slaughter under the "Poultry Products Inspection Act" (PPIA). I won't get into all the lengthy details, but the PPIA includes specific directives so that birds are handled humanely throughout the steps of processing. Is every processing plant perfect? Of course not - but I've never toured a poultry processing plant that didn't aim for 100% compliance with the guidelines. It would be foolish on many levels not to comply and USDA inspectors are in place at all times at the plants to make sure all is handled according to the PPIA. If not, companies may receive a non-compliance report relating to animal welfare and USDA will take action. 

 

You can read more about poultry inspections and also the new rules for the modernization of the poultry inspection system at this website from the National Chicken Council.

 

I'm not going to lie - sometimes being an agriculture advocate can be exhausting. One small blurb in a mainstream magazine like Redbook can feel very much like a David vs. Goliath situation.

 

But it always helps to have supportive friends and colleagues, helping out, sharing information, and sometimes simply giving a word of encouragement. I - like so many of us - know that our communications efforts are worth it so I encourage you to keep at it and advocate for agriculture in ways that make sense for you.

You Go, Girl!

by MNGobbleGal 3 weeks ago

I've read a couple of great blog posts recently about what it means to be a woman in agriculture, which I think most of us know can have its challenges. Agriculture is, no doubt, still very much a man's world. I've also seen the #FarmLikeAGirl hashtag, and in many ways, much of this discussion ties into a recent Super Bowl commercial that talked about women's self esteem in the context of what it means to "throw like a girl" to different age groups of women and girls.

I am equal parts girly and not girly - and proud of both.

I love wearing dresses and pretty shoes.

I love shopping, reading romance novels, and watching so-called chick flicks.

I wear makeup, not because I feel I have to but because I like the way I look in it, and I want to look attractive.

I live in a house with two males; well, three if you count our dog, so anytime I can have some "girl time", I go for it.

But I also love watching Minnesota Vikings football and University of Minnesota basketball with the boys at home - and I play fantasy football.

I don't think twice about waltzing around my little town on a Saturday morning, wearing leggings, a cozy fleece sweatshirt and zero makeup.

I love to work up a good sweat while running or working out. (Although I will also #ThrowLikeAGirl if I play catch with my son - and that's just fine with me.)

And suit me up in big, completely unflattering Tyvek overalls and show me the entrance to a turkey barn any day - I love to get close to the animals.

I have always worked in male-dominated environments.

I was a journalism major in college, where I had more male friends than female, and my first job after graduation was as the editor of a small weekly newspaper just south of Minneapolis. By my own admission, I was a 24 year old woman who looked about 16, covering city government and school board meetings, mostly led by men in their 40s and 50s.

When I got tired of the low pay and high volume of hours of that job (which, on the flip side, gave me mega-amounts of really great experience), I found the job that has become my career over the past 20 years - communications director for the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association.

When I started, I'd attend committee and other meetings and often would be the only female in the room. And to be honest, it's not that much different today. However, during my time with Minnesota Turkey, we welcomed our first female president 10+ years ago, we moved away from having a separate "ladies program" at our annual conference, and we've got two women on our board of directors who provide their own unique perspectives on any number of issues. Plus, four out of the five staff members of our organization are women.

I've heard an occasional comment over the years about women belonging in the kitchen and all that, but mostly, I have been fully respected for the work I do and don't give my female gender a second thought when I'm working.

I don't really know what this all means, except that I have much respect for all the women out there in agriculture - whether you're farming or working on behalf of the industry like I am. In so many ways, all of us are paving the way for future generations of women who are just as passionate about agriculture as we are. We've made progress - with more to come as we look ahead.

And to that, I say - you go, girl!


Why Conferences & Trade Shows Matter

by MNGobbleGal a month ago - last edited a month ago

2014 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention

A view of the 2014 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention - the largest regional poultry show in the U.S.

 

I'm writing this on the way home from the International Poultry and Processing Expo (IPPE) in Atlanta, a huge international poultry show with exhibits, education and networking. I haven't attended this particular event in years (probably at least 15!) so it was really beneficial for me to check it out.

 

Part of my job at the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association is to coordinate a large, regional trade show and conference for the poultry industry every year - the Midwest Poultry Federation (MPF) Convention - so often I was looking at IPPE through the eyes of a meeting planner. Details are king to me when creating and managing an event this size - from signage to rooms sets to how registration flows and how the accompanying mobile app works; it's all important to make sure the attendee experience is positive.

 

I also enjoyed running into many people in the poultry industry that I know - some I see more often than others but no matter what, we always catch up on the latest news and happenings.

 

For many in agriculture, attending events like these serve multiple purposes:

 

  • Education - The poultry farmers I work with look forward to all the education opportunities we provide them at the MPF Convention. We have multiple workshops for the different species - chickens, turkeys and egg layer hens - as well as segments for production, processing, breeding and more. I know that farmers are busy with their own businesses throughout the year, so to be able to take a day or two and get up to speed on the latest production methods, technology and more is important.
  • Exhibits - It's also key for farmers to spend some time in our exhibit hall, visiting with companies and checking out new and existing products. I would venture to say that farmers can - and often do - learn just as much in the exhibit hall as they do in education sessions.
  • Networking - The general public probably doesn't think too much about the need for farmers to "network" with other farmers, but it's absolutely true. We all, in our own careers, find great value in meeting people, talking about what we do, and learning from each other. When we survey attendees at the MPF Convention about what they like best about our show, hands down it is the person-to-person contact and friendships with others in the industry that have the greatest impact.

2014 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention

2014 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention

 

Winter is THE busy meetings season for agriculture organizations, whether it's your local Farm Bureau, a national event like IPPE or one of the other commodity organizations, or specialized groups like Common Ground, which brings together farm blogger women. And, of course, there are so many other conferences, trade show and events!

 

I have spent 20 years organizing our regional convention and have seen our event grow by leaps and bounds. I have also seen what a positive impact an event like ours has on farmers, as they get together, learn, explore, and talk about the challenges and rewards of raising poultry. I highly recommend you take advantage of one or more of these types of in-person opportunities - whether it is local, regional or national.

 

Are you attending a conference this winter? If so, what do you like best about these agriculture-focused events?

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I've come across some interesting web links over the course of the last week or so. None are specifically related to each other (except they all have to do with agriculture and food), but I thought I'd share them all here and give you a few of my thoughts.

 

1) The Washington Post ran a story over the weekend about a recent survey by the Oklahoma State University Department of Agricultural Economics. The gist of the results: over 80 percent of Americans support "mandatory labels on foods containing DNA".

 

As in " deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which is contained in almost all food.

 

My initially reaction, of course, was to shake my head in disbelief. As the article writer, states, "The Oklahoma State survey result is probably an example of the intersection between scientific ignorance and political ignorance, both of which are widespread. The most obvious explanation for the data is that most of these people don’t really understand what DNA is, and don’t realize that it is contained in almost all food. When they read that a strange substance called “DNA” might be included in their food, they might suspect that this is some dangerous chemical inserted by greedy corporations for their own nefarious purposes.

 

The article also mentions this little nugget as proof that the public's scientific knowledge, well, sucks: " A 2012 National Science Foundation survey even found that 25% of Americans don't know that the Earth revolves around the sun rather than vice versa.

 

But where does this leave us? I don't think we can just laugh and look away. And it certainly will not do agriculture any favors to declare general stupidity of a part of the population.  But how do we encourage more scientific knowledge and critical thinking skills - when we know, at the same time, that science doesn't reach people (at least at first), it's the emotional connections that reach people?

 

If one thing is clear, it's that those of us who work in agriculture have more communications work to do.

 

2)  The Atlantic Monthly ran an article this past week that declared, "Essential Oils Might be the New Antibiotics." I'm not an expert in this area so I'm not going to debate the details of the studies mentioned in the article. I will say there seems to be some promise behind this science, however I don't know that I would jump on this yet as the "be-all, end-all" solution quite yet. More study is in order, but the potential of new information like this is always exciting.

 

What's frustrating to me, of course, is that the article itself throws out the usual biases we often hear about antibiotic use in animals. For instance: antibiotic are overused "to speed up growth and to compensate for the cramped, unsanitary living conditions the animals endure." And this: "some farmers need more powerful weapons because they’re trying to compensate for ongoing problems caused by improper cleaning practices and unsanitary living conditions."

 

There's no doubt that bad management can lead to problems in the barn. But to claim that most antibiotics are used under these pretenses is absurd. The farmers I know make clean barns, safe living environments and good animal husbandry the key tenants of their profession - because they know these things will go a long way toward ensuring the health and well-being of their birds.

 

3) Finally, I've been watching this story take shape since late December: the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) has recommended that lean meat be removed from foods recommended for a healthy diet.

 

“The omission is stunning,” NAMI Vice President for Scientific Affairs Betsy Booren told Meatingplace.com. “By not including it, they are completely ignoring any nutritional value that lean meat has to the population.”

 

Stunning is right. And apparently this was all done behind closed doors, which sounds a little suspect to me.

 

As I've written before, I eat meat. I love lean protein like chicken, turkey as well as lean cuts of beef and pork and I believe these options are part of a well-balanced diet. If you don't want to eat meat, that's fine and I respect that it's your choice. But to completely eliminate a nutritious source of protein from a set of national guidelines is worrisome and speaks to a larger, behind-the-scenes, political agenda that could have far-reaching future effects on farmers, ranchers, food companies and the rest of us.

Where is the Decency?

by MNGobbleGal on ‎01-08-2015 06:25 PM

My husband took our 10-year-old (okay, almost 11) son, Joe, to the dentist before Christmas for his regular check-up. Afterwards, the dentist made a point of coming out to the reception room to tell him that Joe was such a nice boy - well behaved and polite and he actually responded to her questions and asked her how she was doing. She admitted that, in her experience, not many kids his age are like that.

 

As parents, of course, this kind of feedback makes us proud. We have always made a point to stress the importance to Joe of being kind, polite and actually talking to people.

 

We want Joe to be a decent human being.

 

It's a pity there are people - adults, mind you - that don't come even close to the level of decency our 10-year-old can show towards others.

 

This week, a group of vegan activists essentially tried to take over a hashtag (#farm365) that was created by a farmer in Canada who decided to share at least one picture of his farm every day in 2015. Other farm bloggers and agriculture advocates also started to use the hashtag in support of this terrific project.

 

Unfortunately, the vegan activists caught wind of this and began leaving a plethora of vile, hate-filled messages on the Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts of various agriculture advocates. I even had a couple on my personal blog's Facebook page.

 

On one hand, I'm doing a quick fist pump because this means these agriculture advocates are getting noticed and people are paying attention to what's being said. On the other hand, there is no way any human being deserves to be treated the way these activists - who, let's be honest here, really aren't paying attention to anything but their own agenda - have been treating these folks.

 

Listen, I understand we all have agendas, as my farm blogger friend, Wanda, so eloquently wrote earlier this week in her Minnesota Farm Living blog. I certainly advocate for animal agriculture - and specifically for eating turkey, chicken and eggs - because I believe in a well-balanced diet that includes animal proteins along with other food groups. And I believe in the integrity of livestock and poultry farmers and their important roles in our food system. But I'm pro-food choice and would never tell anyone what they should or shouldn't eat or guilt someone into feeling bad about their food choices.

 

I've also known a few vegans and vegetarians in my life and they aren't horrible people. The activists I witnessed this week, on the other hand, aren't interested in a conversation or even civil disagreement; they just bully their way around. In many ways, I'm saddened - though perhaps not surprised - that there are members of our society who are so cruel and intolerant and indecent. And I'm also grateful that I am surrounded by family and friends who are open-minded and understand that while we may not agree on everything, we respect the right to our own opinions.

 

In my career, I've had my fair share of run-ins with PETA and the Humane Society of the U.S. - and even Animal Liberation Front, which threw a rock through our office window over Thanksgiving many years ago. That's been the worst of the violence and intolerance I've experienced, until this week.

 

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This is the "autographed" rock that was thrown through the window of the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association many years ago right after Thanksgiving by the Animal Liberation Front.

 

Thankfully, though, I have met many, many people in agriculture who are smart, talented, energetic and full of ideas and enthusiasm. I also saw many people this week come to the defense of the agriculture advocates using the hashtag #farm365. These are the kind of people who give me hope that the world remains a decent place.

 

This is also why I remain committed to showing the strength, diversity, importance, and human side of agriculture to our world. A few radical activists on Facebook or Twitter won't change my mind about that - I'll just hit "delete" and move on.

 

Bring on the New Year!

by MNGobbleGal ‎12-29-2014 07:52 PM - edited ‎12-29-2014 08:28 PM

Happy New Year 2015

 

I'm quite sure I say this every year, but I can't believe it will soon be 2015. In many ways, it's exciting - a new year, a chance to work toward some new goals, and slew of new memories sure to be made. In other ways, it's always just a little sad. Why does time march on so quickly?

 

As I look ahead to the coming months, I have a few personal goals related to "agvocating" to keep in mind.

 

  • Plan ahead for blog posts, especially to get me through what is always a very busy winter work season. (It's no coincidence that most agriculture conferences for farmers are in the winter!) I know this won't always happen, but I'm going to jot down random ideas when I get them and use a planner to schedule blog posts for both my personal blog and my Agriculture.com blog. For me, it helps to have a calendar that keeps me on track.
  • Create a new blog for the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association on its website. This is something I'm really excited about. I've got the blog infrastructure in place; I just need to organize some volunteer turkey farmer bloggers who are willing to share their day-to-day-stories on the farm. There are very few turkey farmers who have blogs, so I hope this will help people understand more about what they do to raise their birds. And because Minnesota is ranked #1 for turkey production in the U.S., our website serves as a resource for people all over the country. This will be an amazing added communications piece to what we're already doing.
  • I definitely want to blog more turkey recipes on my own personal blog. I'm not one of those cooks who really creates my own recipes (beyond a few minor tweaks here and there) - but I love to cook for my family and I try a lot of different recipes from bloggers, cookbooks, and family favorites. I think there's a real need to share delicious, easy-to-make recipes using a variety of turkey products - it might help a few people realize turkey is more than just a holiday option.

For New Year's Eve, my husband, son and I are headed back to the farm to enjoy a meal and time with my parents, siblings and their families. We find this to be much more our style than a fancy night out - although that can certainly be fun, too! (And apparently, our tendency to stay home on New Year's Even isn't unusual - I just saw a study by Barefoot Wine & Bubbly that 61% of Americans intend to ring in 2015 in the comfort of their own homes.)

 

I've got the meal all planned out so that I can cook for everyone - deep fried turkey (using my amazing indoor electric turkey fryer), cheesy potato gratin (a recipe from Williams-Sonoma that is so delicious) and broccoli and cauliflower casserole (a new recipe I've never tried before via The Pioneer Woman). Right now, it looks like dessert will be ice cream with my mom's homemade hot fudge sauce. And plenty of champagne to ring in the New Year, of course!

 

Deep Fried Turkey.jpg

 

Whatever your New Year's Eve brings - whether it's a quiet evening at home or a festive and sparkly party out on the town - I hope you enjoy the evening and I wish you much happiness, peace and prosperity in 2015.

 

Thank you so much for reading my blog posts here over the past year, and I look forward to seeing you in the New Year!

 

Blessings of Family, Friends and Farm

by MNGobbleGal on ‎12-21-2014 08:00 PM

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As Christmas week kicks off, I spent the day baking pans and pans of cinnamon rolls (The Pioneer Woman's fabulous recipe!), playing Christmas carols on the piano, and checking my gift list twice to make sure we're ready for the week ahead.

 

I'm ready to slow down a little, take a few days off from work, and spend time with family, celebrating the season.

Tuesday night I'll have my own little Christmas with my husband and son. We're planning to cook up some steaks after I get home from work and then we'll open our gifts around the Christmas tree. (Yes, we do eat more than turkey at my house. :smileyhappy: But no worries for any of my poultry peeps, I'm already planning to deep fry a turkey for New Year's Eve!)

 

On Christmas Eve, we'll travel to my father-in-law's home, where my husband's family will gather, kids will run around until it's time to open gifts, and there will be Christmas cookies galore to snack on. Then on Christmas Day, we'll drive to my parent's home on the farm and have another delicious meal, more sweets and even more presents.

 

We are blessed. And for me, there is nothing that beats spending Christmas on the farm.

 

On behalf of my family, I want to wish you a very Merry Christmas and hope you are able to take some time to relax, amidst the never-ending farm work and other commitments, and savor the special moments of the week.

 

It's the little things that count and the blessings of family, friends and farm that mean the most to so many of us.

 

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The job of an agriculture advocate - or "agvocate" - is never done. In fact, sometimes it can seem downright daunting to share the truths behind farming, growing crops, and raising livestock and poultry. Think about it - there are so many people to reach. Where do we even start? And once we do start, it's easy to wonder if people are actually listening.

 

I had one of those moments last week when I saw this headline come across my smartphone, while I was sitting in a meeting with several poultry farmers: "Largest School Districts Going with Antibiotic-Free Chicken." 

 

According to the article, the Urban School Food Alliance announced its new antibiotic-free standard for companies to follow when supplying chicken products to its schools. The Alliance is a coalition of the largest school districts in the U.S., includes New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami-Dade, Dallas and Orlando, and serves nearly 2.9 million students every day.

 

But don't they realize that all chicken consumers buy is free from antibiotics?

 

The answer is clear (or is it, clear as mud?): no, they don't.

 

Minnesota Chicken Farmer small.jpg

 

Truth: All poultry flocks are tested for antiobiotic residue before being sent to the processing plant. If there is one tiny little trace of antibiotics found, the entire flock is held back until testing shows zero antibiotics. That's why chicken sold in supermarkets or purchased for school foodservice or restaurant use is antibiotic-free. 

 

But according to an article, the organization believes sourcing antibiotic-free chicken will show the school districts "truly care about the health and well-being of the students." The organization infers that farmers who give antibiotics to their chickens are doing so improperly and without regard to humans or the environment.

 

I wonder if anyone in the Urban School Food Alliance has ever talked to a farmer or a veterinarian who oversees antibiotic usage on poultry farms?

 

As I've written in this blog before, antibiotics are one tool in the toolbox for farmers. In particular, the poultry farmers I know and work with every day have many other management methods in place that are aimed at keeping their birds healthy - and not needing antibiotics.  But, it's also true that the poultry farmers I know believe it's the humane thing to care for sick birds, and if that means antibiotics, they work with a local veterinarian to ensure the proper dosage and use for the flock. This includes making sure they adhere to the appropriate withdrawal period before any birds go to the processing plant.

 

I'm not at all suggesting that farmers should get a pass on antibiotic usage and its impact on antibiotic resistance in humans. To be sure, both areas of antibiotic use - human and animal - need to be considered carefully. However, I find it concerning that our nation's largest school districts can enact policies not based on fact, yet tout that students will somehow be healthier for it while inaccurately portraying most farmers as bad apples.

 

The only thing clear to me amidst all this mud is that agvocates like myself have a lot more work to do.

6 Ways I Make the Holidays Happy

by MNGobbleGal on ‎12-03-2014 01:08 PM

I have a confession to make.

 

I went home at lunch one day this week to let our dog outside and pick up a file I had forgotten to bring to the office. (I live only a couple of miles from my work, so it's nice to have that flexibility.) Only problem was, once I got home, all I wanted to do was put on some comfy clothes, make some hot chocolate, turn on the Christmas tree lights and get some holiday baking done.

 

Does anybody else feel that way this time of year?

 

No worries - I was responsible enough to back to the office and get the rest of my work day finished. Later in the evening, though, I watched "A Charlie Brown Christmas" with my husband and my 10-year-old son, Joe, and the same feeling came over me. Something akin to - I don't want to miss the beauty and the fun of Christmas season because I'm so busy working or running errands or doing whatever it is I do every day.

 

Now don't get me wrong - if you read my posts, you know how much I enjoy my career and everything it entails. But I'm going to be honest here: work, for me, continues to be busy right through Thanksgiving and beyond. Then, when I throw in the extra holiday happenings, the piano recital, the Sunday School program, the feeling that I must create a wonderful holiday home for my family, plus get all the shopping done ... and I can feel more wiped out and frazzled than happy.

 

The older I get, though, the more I realize I really don't need to over-extend myself to get it "all" done. I've found (at least for me), if I follow a few simple tips, I can enjoy the season and make memories with my family that don't involve a stressed out wife and mom who is tearing her hair out while buying the wrong gifts last minute. :smileyhappy:

 

1) Make time for holiday movies. In other words, I gather my family, make a bunch of popcorn (with butter!), and enjoy "A Christmas Story" (and any other holiday favorites) for the umpteenth time. It's one of our traditions and we all love it.

 

2) Decorate - but don't go crazy and over-decorate. After Thanksgiving, we put up our Christmas tree and deck out a few areas of our house, including our outside front porch provided the weather cooperates. But I stop at that. I used to do more, but now I'd prefer to maximize my family time. Plus, we really only spend time in a few rooms in the house so as long as those look festive, we're good. (Bonus - less stress when I have to take it all down and pack it up after New Year's.)

 

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One of my favorite ornaments for our tree - a turkey, of course!

 

3) By all means, bake some cookies. I love to bake - just ask my office mates, as I am constantly bringing in homemade treats for them to try. It's actually a real stress-reliever for me. It's all about the actual baking, even more than the eating. (Sorry - it's true, although I do love to eat too, so don't worry about that!) I don't spend 12 hours baking 15 different kind of cookies in one gigantic marathon session, but I pick a couple of tried-and-true recipes plus maybe one new one to try, and I'll get to work in the kitchen. Two of my  traditions include iced Christmas cookies (Joe and I love to decorate these together) and a Norwegian tradition, kringla - which I haven't perfected but I'm working on it and I get better at it every year!

 

4) Play Christmas music. Another stress reliever for me - any time of year, actually - has always been playing piano, and once I get past Thanksgiving, the Christmas books come out and I sneak some time in to play a few songs every once in awhile.

 

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Playing Christmas music on the piano puts a smile on my face.

 

5) Organize, organize, organize. Yes, I'm one of those people. I have a Christmas spreadsheet that has a tab for all the gifts I need to buy (including a column for how much I pay) along with separate tabs for Christmas lists from my husband and our son. For me, it keeps me sane as I know I won't forget anyone that way - plus it helps keep us on budget. (It's probably no fun to say "budget" and Christmas in the same sentence, but for me, it's important to track what we spend.)

 

6) Try to keep work at work. This isn't always possible, especially as I head into our busy convention season at the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association, but in December, I do try to keep the work at home at night to a minimum. (That way, I have more time to watch holiday movies or bake cookies!)

 

There are many other ways to keep sane and enjoy the true reasons for the season, of course, but these are just a few of the ways that help me in December.

 

I'm in awe of all the farm women out there who work tirelessly all year-round plus do everything else during the holiday season. After all, I can manage my office job (or at least) try if it's getting overwhelming, whereas if I had a barn full of turkeys to care for 24-7, that would be another story!

 

I'd love to hear your tips for relieving stress and enjoying the spirit of Christmas. Do any of my tips ring true to you? Feel free to share in the comments!

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Here I am, a year ago, with the National Thanksgiving Turkey and his alternate in Washington DC.

 

It's Thanksgiving week!

 

After 19 years of working on behalf of Minnesota's turkey farmers, this week still never gets old. From a work perspective, it's a rush to take the litany of media calls we get this time of year from across the U.S. And I love the tradition of our annual Governor's Thanksgiving presentation, which unofficially ushers in the holiday season in our state.

 

On a personal side, I love Thanksgiving as a holiday. I love that it's all about giving thanks for our blessings. I love that it's about enjoying the ultimate comfort meal with family and friends. I love that the biggest pressure is how many slices of pie to have. (As if that is really any kind of dilemma anyway.)

 

Here are a few things I'm especially thankful for this year:

 

1) I am thankful for a job I love. My brother, a farmer, told me last spring that I am the only person he knows who truly loves pretty much every aspect of their job. While I am sure many others do also love their jobs as much as I do, I am grateful to have found a 19+ year career in agriculture communications, working on behalf of Minnesota's turkey farmers. It is truly an honor to share their stories and in return, they have given me so many opportunities to grow and expand my skills.

 

2) I am thankful for growing up on a farm. While I'm certain i didn't appreciate this nearly enough while I was a teenager, I can safely say that with age does indeed bring a certain amount of wisdom. Growing up on a farm is a special existence, gave me an appreciation for hard work and success, and continues to provide me unique ways to connect with people every day.

 

3) I am thankful for all the farmers who help bring us our Thanksgiving meal. Farmers work hard. Really hard. The older I get, the more I am in awe of all the well-rounded knowledge and steadfast commitment they have to run a successful farm business, raise their animals with care, and ensure a successful harvest.

 

4) I am thankful for many fantastic women in agriculture. Social media and blogging has opened up many doors for me and I've met so many amazing people. I am grateful, especially, for all the women in agriculture who have encouraged me, given me new ideas, helped me learn about agricultural industries I'm not as familiar with, and who are my sounding board.

 

5) I am thankful for my mom's Thanksgiving meal. I have a confession to make: even though I talk about turkey every day, I am typically not the one making the turkey for Thanksgiving. That role goes to my mother, who is an amazing cook and hostess. I am grateful that we will travel to the farm this year, relax with my family, and enjoy the roast turkey, stuffing, cranberries, sweet potatoes and so much more that will be on our table. Thanks, Mom, in advance for all your hard work - you rock!

 

This Thanksgiving, I hope you are able to take time and count your blessings with family, as well as enjoy a feast of food that includes the very centerpiece of the meal: turkey.