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sdholloway56
Senior Advisor

Re: $112 fats

I am somewhat familiar with the research on the matter and a little skeptical of what I think is an overemphasis on the role of red meat.

Still, when you get a warning from someone who actually knows what they are talking about, you are a fool not to take heed.

My wife was a little shaken by that but she has stayed fit all her life and is very solid in other markers like BP. I think everything will be fine.

sdholloway56
Senior Advisor

Re: $112 fats

Considerable controversy over whether extreme diets like Ornish can actually reverse arterial plaque.

Here’s what I think- people who have the genetic predisposition should absolutely consider eating that way, or close to it.

It isn’t a one size fits all thing, which leaves lots of room for lobbies (either side) or just plain mischief makers to muddy the waters. And those dang lyin’ sine-tiss.

Not that people without the predisposition can’t and don’t quite frequently wreck their hearts by being obese, sedentary, diabetic.

sdholloway56
Senior Advisor

Re: $112 fats

.......speaking of mischief makers....

sdholloway56
Senior Advisor

Re: $112 fats

While the near 100 yr. neoliberal/socialist ag mentality is MUST HAVE MORE MEAT EAT MORE CORN there is a lot of ground currently growing corn for ethanol that is a total waste of time and effort- EROEI under 1 (not true of the best land, but there's only so much of that).

It would be better put to use as grass if there was sufficient demand for the product. And that would mean less corn grown/used, not an apocalypse for anybody but those subsidiary industries that want maximum acres/bushels. Not even for them, really, they'd just have to adapt.

 

 

sdholloway56
Senior Advisor

Re: $112 fats

Of course if the feed additives play out, the feedlot and dairy barn would be the simplest places to implement them.

But I'm confident it could be figured out for pasture/range with blocks, salt limited supplemental feeding etc.

RJG640v8
Senior Contributor

Re: $112 fats


@sdholloway56 wrote:

While the near 100 yr. neoliberal/socialist ag mentality is MUST HAVE MORE MEAT EAT MORE CORN there is a lot of ground currently growing corn for ethanol that is a total waste of time and effort- EROEI under 1 (not true of the best land, but there's only so much of that).

It would be better put to use as grass if there was sufficient demand for the product. And that would mean less corn grown/used, not an apocalypse for anybody but those subsidiary industries that want maximum acres/bushels. Not even for them, really, they'd just have to adapt.

 

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Akaushi beef contains a higher concentration of monounsaturated fat relative to saturated fat, which the American Heart Association notes can lead to lower cholesterol, the prevention of coronary heart disease, and weight loss. On a per serving basis, these cattle tend to provide a much higher dose of monounsaturated fatty acids compared to saturated fatty acids. These fats are generally promoted as “Heart Healthy” and are often associated with decreased risks of cardiovascular conditions like heart disease. An added benefit for Akaushi Beef lies in its oleic acid content. A typical serving of ground beef from these Akaushi cattle can contain over nine grams of this beneficial compound.

Grass-fed beef has also been found to have a healthier ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids. It often contains higher levels of antioxidants like vitamin E and A, too.

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you may not have heard about the Piedmontese breed but it's is well worth trying. It will surprise you at first bite. Piedmontese beef is high in protein and beefy flavor. 

Both Piedmontese and Wagyu come from breeds of cattle with unique genetics that affect their beef. Piedmontese benefits from a genetic composition that makes for beef that is incredibly lean while simultaneously tender and flavorful. Wagyu beef comes from Kuroge-washu cattle, with its own genetic make-up that results in more intramuscular fat and extremely marbled meat.

Piedmontese cattle originate from Northwestern Italy in the Piedmont region, but have been raised in North America since the 1970s. The inactive myostatin gene, a unique genetic strain in Piedmontese cattle, allows for the breed's renowned "double muscling." This feature increases tenderness without producing excess marbling, which results in a higher lean-to-fat ratio and lower cholesterol.

In blind taste tests, Piedmontese often beats 100% purebred and Japanese Wagyu steaks. While Piedmontese is completely different from Wagyu, it often comes out on top during taste tests. 

In a commodity market focused on marbling, Piedmontese are something special. This breed is nowhere seen in the commodity feedlot market because their myostatin gene makes them difficult to raise and unlikely to marble at the rates necessary for the USDA grading scheme. Translation: even though the beef is incredibly tender and flavorful, because of it's lean red looks, the commodity grading system doesn't give it the credit it deserves. So the producers — very few as they may be — avoid the commodity system, and it remains a niche beef that is extremely hard to find.

Much like Wagyu, Piedmontese beef is healthier than commercial alternatives. Piedmontese beef is higher in protein and Omega-3 fatty acids, while being consistently tender with fewer calories. The meat is lean without losing the rich, beefy flavor.

 

working on breeding projects with both these breeds , in a grass based system... 

 

 


 

 

sdholloway56
Senior Advisor

Re: $112 fats

Former regular Schnurrbart is a Piedmontese guy.