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Papa Wheelie
Senior Contributor

The Dewy Decimal System

Used to aclimate students to the day they went to work in the factory where bells and whistles told you what was being done. Basically a stealth program to make factory workers.

 

Pretty much the same model for education today.

 

The foundations were not born of good will but rather to combat bad PR the Robber Barons had.

 

Sam, I wonder how many on here understand what a liberal arts education really means?

 

Samnospam
Advisor

Re: The Dewy Decimal System

Sam, I wonder how many on here understand what a liberal arts education really means?

 

It's an uphill battle, a liberal education, and I don't mean that from the degree on a piece of paper perspective.   The hardest part is unlearning all the things taught as fact but are really more of perspective within a context.   Our  education is a tremendous barrier really that fills us with prejudices that are very hard to overcome.

bruce MN
Advisor

Re: A good site to bookmark

I've read quite a bit of the Gatto stuff that is on-line and agree with some and don't with some.

 

But whatever education has devolved to didn't come to it  because of some unwise grand plan that failed.  More so as a result of respectable efforts under progressively deteriorating conditions coming under constant and oppressive external attack.

 

 

Samnospam
Advisor

Re: A good site to bookmark

But whatever education has devolved to didn't come to it  because of some unwise grand plan that failed. 

 

In that one day one person wrote down a grand plan yes, but there was/is a plan, you could start here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horace_Mann

 

More so as a result of respectable efforts under progressively deteriorating conditions coming under constant and oppressive external attack.

 

Feedback loop?

 


johnaa
Advisor

This could be the future of education

  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khan_Academy   The Khan Academy is a not-for-profit[1] educational organization, created in 2006 by Bangladeshi American[2] educator Salman Khan, a graduate of MIT. With the stated mission of "providing a high quality education to anyone, anywhere", the website supplies a free online collection of more than 2,900 micro lectures via video tutorials stored on YouTube teaching Mathematics, History, Healthcare & Medicine, Finance, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Astronomy, Economics, Cosmology and Computer Science.[3]

 

snip--The project relies on donations for funding. Khan Academy is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization,[1] now with significant backing from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Google. Several people have made $10,000 contributions; Ann and John Doerr gave $100,000; total revenue is about $150,000 in donations. Additionally, it also earned $2,000 a month from ads on the Web site in 2010, until Khan Academy ceased to accept advertising.[7] As of September 2010, Google announced they would be providing the Khan Academy with $2 million to support the creation of more courses and to enable the Khan Academy to translate their core library into the world’s most widely spoken languages, as part of their Project 10100.[8]

snip--

The major components of Khan Academy include:[14]

  • a video library with over 2,700 videos in various topic areas and over 110 million lessons delivered.[15][16] These videos are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License.[17]
  • automated exercises with continuous assessment; there are more than 275 exercises, mainly in math, including four challenges and 272 individual modules.
  • peer-to-peer tutoring based on objective data collected by the system, a process that will be projected in the future.

Not-for-profit partner organizations are making the content available outside of YouTube. The Lewis Center for Educational Research, which is affiliated with NASA, is bringing the content into community colleges and charter schools around the United States. World Possible is creating offline snapshots of the content to distribute in rural, developing regions with limited or no access to the Internet.[4][18]

Khan has stated a vision of turning the academy into a charter school:

This could be the DNA for a physical school where students spend 20 percent of their day watching videos and doing self-paced exercises and the rest of the day building robots or painting pictures or composing music or whatever.[7]

A November 2011 grant of $5 million from Ireland-based The O'Sullivan Foundation, founded by Avego MD and cloud computing pioneer Sean O'Sullivan, which will be directed to three initiatives; expanding the teaching faculty, extending content through crowd-sourced contributions following a Wikipedia-style model and developing curricula to help users blend the content with physical teaching through STEM learning.

Recent teaching appointees as a result of the grant include Dr. Steven Zucker, formerly of Pratt Institute and Dr. Beth Harris, from the Museum of Modern Art in New York, to produce art and history content.

bruce MN
Advisor

Re: This could be the future of education

Family member who works in cirriculum development and faculty support in a metro inner city high school school was telling us about this over the holidays.  Says there is a tremendous amount of interst and potential support for it in disadvantaged schools but that the suburban and population center districts and the more upscale religious privates are very cool on it.

 

Said that, as always, the better positioned  are very determined to "keep our kids" where they've got them.  FWIW, she is no political radical.  Quite conservative, actually. 

Papa Wheelie
Senior Contributor

Re: The Dewy Decimal System

Mark Twain said never let schoolin' interfere with your education. How true.

 

I am fortunate to have had a few teachers who encouraged their students to learn, explore and not take what was in those McMillian text books as the gospel.

 

What is missing in today's schools is teaching how to learn, the joy of discovering something you did not know and then putting that knowledge to work.

 

man of steel
Senior Contributor

Re: The Dewy Decimal System

I think us radical, uncaring, greedy conservatives have been saying that for years. We have been opposed with arguments about how more money will buy whats missing in education.
Red Steele
Veteran Advisor

the key word is "progressive"

as in "progressively deteriorating ".

 

Little bit of irony.

Samnospam
Advisor

Re: The Dewy Decimal System

Got a call from the school this week, it was an automated call announcing some new program. I hardly listened to the call, really only did because these calls usually give you some school news about early dismissals, etc.. Anyhow it was announcing a program to help disadvantaged students and they had a new hire whose title was "family intervention specialist". The contact person if you were interested in the services of this specialist is the former elementary school principal who retired (Yeah, fat pension) then took a job with the district as the person who handles all federal programs. More money.