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Senior Contributor

Are you Scatophobia?

It could be called fecal-phobia.

 

I don't want to step in it.  I don't like the smell of it.  I don't want it on me or around me.  I don't like the looks of it.  I'm not afraid of it though.

 

It's the same as homosexuals and transgenders.  I don't like the looks of it, don't want it around me but I'm not afraid of it. 

 

A phobia is a fear, not a disgust or aversion. 

 

Throwing out the word phobia may make the speaker feel superior but I suspect most of those using the term are suffering from Phronemophobia.

7 Replies
Highlighted
Senior Advisor

Re: Are you Scatophobia?

Actually, homosexuals or transgenders might feel the same way about you. Not that there is anything physically wrong with you but you evidently hold them in disdain. So why not just leave them alone and quit trying to deny them the same rights you enjoy?

Highlighted
Veteran Advisor

Re: Are you Scatophobia?

Since you obviously feel it is a choice, I suspect that you fear one may hit on you and you might magically like it and become one.  Also, just to point out to you, "phobia" is a condition/noun and the word to use when you ask "are you" should be "phobic"/adjective.

Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: Are you Scatophobia?

I've no doubt you're half right.  I don't deny anyone any rights that I have and am not in favor of denying anyone any rights I have nor am I in favor of bestowing any rights on anyone because of some claimed difference from the norm.

 

I believe we should respect each other as human beings with certain God given rights.  However that doesn't mean that one human should receive special treatment because they claim a proclivity for activities outside the generally accepted norm.  Nor does it mean that I should be forced to accept their view of the world when it's obviously abnormal. 

 

Should we allow anybody to simply claim they are one thing while obviously they are another?  Only a very short sighted person couldn't see the dangers in that.

 

And why should one group of people be given special treatment under the law?  For example why if you are beaten by a group of people who are of a different race or sexual orientation should they be charged with a hate crime when obviously if they were beating you the same amount and were of the same race and orientation it would only be assault?

 

 

Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: Are you Scatophobia?

"Also, just to point out to you, "phobia" is a condition/noun and the word to use when you ask "are you" should be "phobic"/adjective." yes you're right.

and as usual only half

"Since you obviously feel it is a choice, I suspect that you fear one may hit on you and you might magically like it and become one." You're wrong.

Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: Are you Scatophobia?

Good question...Hate crimes have the potential to divide society whereas simple crimes and misdemeanors generally don't. Hate crimes have the potential to impact an entire group of society rather than the individuals involved in a singular crime. In a regular crime, take a beating for example, the motive for it is not an issue. In a hate crime, the motive is very important to the prosecution of the crime and the motive does not remain hidden from justice. Police can be a lot more effective in stopping a crime if they understand the motovation and circumstances where the victim was chosen. If we are to stop hate crimes, how can we do that without determining the motive and circumstances which bring them about?

 

Here's a little more:

 

"Hate crimes always comprise two elements: a criminal offence committed with
a bias motive.
The first element of a hate crime is that an act is committed that constitutes
an offence under ordinary criminal law. This criminal act is referred to in this
guide as the “base offence”. Because there are small variations in legal provisions
from country to country, there are some divergences in the kind of conduct that
amounts to a crime; but in general most countries criminalize the same type of
violent acts. Hate crimes always require a base offence to have occurred. If there
is no base offence, there is no hate crime.

The second element of a hate crime is that the criminal act is committed with
a particular motive, referred to in this guide as “bias”. It is this element of bias
motive that differentiates hate crimes from ordinary crimes. This means that the
perpetrator intentionally chose the target of the crime because of some protected
characteristic.

•• The target may be one or more people, or it may be property associated
with a group that shares a particular characteristic.
•• A protected characteristic is a characteristic shared by a group, such as
“race”, language, religion, ethnicity, nationality, or any other similar common
factor."

 

Source: http://www.osce.org/odihr/36426

 

Highlighted
Senior Advisor

Re: Are you Scatophobia?

Hate crimes are an act of terror pure and simple. If the motivation is directed toward striking fear in the hearts and minds of a segment of society. For instance, burning a cross on your lawn may not injure you personally, but it might strike fear into you and people like you.

 

Dragging a black man behind your pickup is a hate crime because the intent was to make ashocking statement to blacks in the community that they are probably a target of such racist zeal. Evidence of intent of intimidation of a whole segment of our society.

Highlighted
Veteran Advisor

Re: Are you Scatophobia?

That's fine and dandy, but let's be consistent, and charge the peeps on 'beat whitey' day with a hate crime, as well, or drop the distinction completely, as far as punishment goes. I think motivation is a good thing to know, in terms of solving a crime, and preventing others, but if a more severe punishment is a one way street, it is wrong.