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Advisor

Bullwinkle's history corner- a Milligan ancestor and more

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambdin_P._Milligan

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1863/03/22/news/deserters-indiana-butternuts-rescue-them-after-arrest-copperh...

 

I was thinking about knotheads in general and got to pondering the copperhead resistance to the Civil War in Indiana.

 

While Indiana contributed the second most men to the Union there was a substantial anti-war resistance. As Governor Morton told Lincoln, "no northern state has so many southerners". Generally the resistance was stronger south and east- Cincinnati was a copperhead hotbed. See NYT link.

 

Lincoln barely carried Indiana and Illinois in 1860 and by no means a landslide in 1864.

 

It is/was a free country and even Mr. Milligan was later vindicated by the SCOTUS for his wartime detention and near execution, a victory for the rule of law once the state of hostilities had ceased.

 

Grievances of the copperheads were many but certainly race was a significant factor as opposition strengthened after the Emancipation Proclamation. Indiana had historically been more compliant with the Fugitive Slave Law than other northern states and the southern counties were obviously the most likely places for apprehension.

 

Although I imagine that some people just are against stuff and particularly the very liberal, progressive Republican economic platform.

16 Replies
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Advisor

Re: Bullwinkle's history corner- a Milligan ancestor and more

Probably an element of just not wanting to see undeserving people get ahead.

 

The dozens of my ancestors and their relatives who fought on the Union side were off for the west like a shot once they were discharged.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Bullwinkle's history corner- a Milligan ancestor and more

If they all went west then how did you end up here? My great Grandfather fought with General Sherman and was with him on the march to the sea. He was wounded in Chattanooga and went no further. My Grandfather told me his father told him as he laid in the hospital tent he could see the cannon balls flying across the sky. My great Grandfather came back home to finish his life on the home place. Today my family's is into the 5th generation on the same farm.

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Senior Advisor

Re: Bullwinkle's history corner- a Milligan ancestor and more


@hardnox wrote:

Probably an element of just not wanting to see undeserving people get ahead.

 

The dozens of my ancestors and their relatives who fought on the Union side were off for the west like a shot once they were discharged.


I'm glad your family was sooooo much better than the rest of the racist that populated the state. Indiana probably needs to pay more than most of the rest of the states when it comes to reparations.

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Advisor

Re: Bullwinkle's history corner- a Milligan ancestor and more

The hyperreactionary mindset is still evident in some of those areas, as well as others.

 

Primary marker for it today is climate science denialism- sort of similar if you unpack it.

 

Viewed as a conspiracy against the established order.

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Advisor

Re: Bullwinkle's history corner- a Milligan ancestor and more

The place was already filling up- for the poorer people who didn't have land it was time to move on and get some.

 

3th great grandfather who was with the 100th Indiana from start to finish moved on to IL. He's buried in the National Cemetery at Danville. His children ended up in IL, MN, IA, KS. My 2nd great grandfather was too young to go and I'm guessing made a buck or two off the war boom (sort of like the patriarchs of present BTOdom).

 

He married a woman whose family had land. Might have also been assisted by the reduction of potential suitors.

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Advisor

Re: Bullwinkle's history corner- a Milligan ancestor and more

The Milligan case remains a very relevant precedent today in regards to the rights of US citizens during wartime.

 

BTW, the judgment in his favor was that a military tribunal is not valid when civil courts are still functioning. Extremely relevant.

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Advisor

Re: Bullwinkle's history corner- a Milligan ancestor and more

There are a zillion American stories. It would have been perfectly acceptable for someone to loyally oppose the Civil War. In Mr. Milligan's case it doesn't appear that was very strong in terms of direct involvement with insurrectionist plotting and in any case, he was utimately protected by the constitution on the basis of due process.

 

But I'll submit that my own American story is pretty central- poor people who had great opportunity due to enlightened polcies. In the very next generation after the war my 2nd G grandfather was a relatively prosperous farmer and sent 3 sons to, OMG, those socialist state universities. In that line, many generations of engieers, a few doctors, teachers, businessmen. Not a criminal in the bunch and some reasonable contributions to society.

 

Unfortunately, they/we haven't a single gazillionaire in the whole lot. And thus are losers.

 

Guess we'll just have to suck it up and beg our betters to trickle some of the lucre down.

 

 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Nope, Nox


@hardnox wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambdin_P._Milligan

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1863/03/22/news/deserters-indiana-butternuts-rescue-them-after-arrest-copperh...

 

I was thinking about knotheads in general and got to pondering the copperhead resistance to the Civil War in Indiana.

 

While Indiana contributed the second most men to the Union there was a substantial anti-war resistance. As Governor Morton told Lincoln, "no northern state has so many southerners". Generally the resistance was stronger south and east- Cincinnati was a copperhead hotbed. See NYT link.

 

Lincoln barely carried Indiana and Illinois in 1860 and by no means a landslide in 1864.

 

It is/was a free country and even Mr. Milligan was later vindicated by the SCOTUS for his wartime detention and near execution, a victory for the rule of law once the state of hostilities had ceased.

 

Grievances of the copperheads were many but certainly race was a significant factor as opposition strengthened after the Emancipation Proclamation. Indiana had historically been more compliant with the Fugitive Slave Law than other northern states and the southern counties were obviously the most likely places for apprehension.

 

Although I imagine that some people just are against stuff and particularly the very liberal, progressive Republican economic platform.


Nope, my family line was spelled Milliken up to 1860 and then changed to the present spelling. I'm actually more Scottish than Irish. Milliken is the Scottish spelling. They were conservative Presbyterian, not Catholic. My branch came to Iowa in 1854 to Jasper County. Jacob Milliken, my Great-Great Grandfather, is buried there. 

 

If you are looking for knotheads, go to your bathroom , if you have one, and look at the guy in the looking glass. 

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Advisor

Re: Nope, Nox

Durn. I just figured that given his penchant for hyperreactionary insurrectionism there was a good chance.