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Senior Advisor

Can you imagine

surviving the 100 degree temps without air conditioning?  The old man probably remembers shocking oats or pitching bundles on hot hot days. I suppose the new combines with air conditioning and dust free cabs is an improvement.

 

My future grand son in law's mother is visiting from italy and she cannot tolerate air conditioning. He has the thermostat set at 80 degrees. Other wise she is wrapped in sweaters all the time. Very few homes in Italy are cooled like they are here.

3 Replies
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Veteran Advisor

Re: Can you imagine

I stacked hay all my life in hot barns that were over 100 degrees in, not to mention hornet's nests. Makes ya tough!
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Senior Contributor

Re: Can you imagine

I also remember that at nights, we would look for the room with a little breeze for sleeping. My wife, living in town often could not even find a breeze, so they slept out on the porch. She was amaed how much cooler it was in the country without all the houses to block the breeze. Imagine doing that today with all the crime and drive by shootings.

How lucky we are today.

No Kraft, I never pitched bundles. My dad bought his first combine, a 5 ft Allis Chalmers in 1935

I learned to drive a car bringing water to the wheat shockers, These guys would come looking for work and you would have to feed them and provide someplace to sleep

They were unemployed, but willing to work, no matter how hard or dirty. There was no welfare then.

How much better it is today. Lets keekk it better

 

It is possible that she does not have the humidity in Italy that we have in the midwest

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Senior Contributor

Re: Can you imagine

Craig. Stacking bales is not the same. I am skilled and practised in building hay stacks built with sheaves weighing about 10 pound. Completing a stack of about 50 tons and making the roof waterproof is the skill my friend. Anyone can stack bales. I did it for 15 years and have photographic proof of it and was the only person for a hundred miles who could do it. And still can. But that was another life thankfully.