cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Explain this one on hamburger

70% of the tests done by USDA Food Safety Inspection Service on ground beef for Ecoli 0157 are done at the small and very small plants that produce less than 1% of the nations ground beef supply.  (For the record, I don't produce ground beef but I do have serious issues with the accountability of the USDA in how it inspects little plants.)

7 Replies
Veteran Advisor

Re: Explain this one on hamburger

No explanation but a few questions about the figure.

Is the 70% because there are more small plants? 1 test in each small plant would maybe add up even though they did 2 tests in each big plant.

Do they test more where the problem is? Not accusing just asking.

I do know that if there is a problem in a big plant that problem will be much bigger and wider spread in the population than from a small plant.

Senior Contributor

Re: Explain this one on hamburger

The small opperators don`t grease the palms of the inspectors as generously as the big plants?

Smiley Wink 

Veteran Contributor

Re: Explain this one on hamburger

Every small town locker is a part of the USDA inspections and accounts for the 70% figure.  Don't think there is any bias as the big plants have full time inspectors on site versus random inspections for the lockers.

 

Cropdoc

Senior Contributor

Re: Explain this one on hamburger

70% aren't in Chicago or they are owned by Republicans

Senior Contributor

Re: Explain this one on hamburger

Hit the nail on the head. It is always about the money.

Senior Contributor

Re: Explain this one on hamburger

You have false information.  The facts are most big plants now days are processing only plants and have patrol inspection where the inspector also covers half a dozen other plants.  Most little plants that still slaughter have full time inspection.  So, you are about 180 degrees from correct.  USDA is intentionally sheilding the big boys from inspection but that is just my opinion.  And every small town locker is not necessarily part of USDA inspection.  Most are state inspected.  And most USDA locker plants are custom exempt which means they can not sell any of the meat (labelled Not for Sale for the owner of the animal) and they get an inspection once or twice a year to address their facility and basic sanitation.

Senior Contributor

Re: Explain this one on hamburger

I understand a little bit (but not enough obviously) about statistics and probability as it relates to finding pathogens and the testing that is required if that is the mission.  An excellent example.  John Munsell's small plant that started the big hoorah over 0157 testing in little plants had 16 tests the year that they ended up finding a postitve.  (not 16 tests because they found a positive.  16 leading up to a postive.)  The Cargill plant that he was getting product from also had 16 tests that year (where the 0157 was coming from.)

I'd just like someone to explain to me how our government is doing its job and how they aren't set out to put little plants out of business while they are shielding the big plants?  That is all I'm asking for.  And like I said I don't have a dog in the ground beef fight.  We don't do beef.  All I know that top to bottom USDA is convinced that little plants don't know their job and big plants can do nothing wrong.  And their own recalls show that big plants account for the overwhelming majority of recalls by recalls and by pounds even though they have a very small portion of the tests.

Its something like 85% of the beef are killed in thirteen plants in the US.  USDA doesn't track the source of any of their testing.  Most little and big plants now days are only grinding facilities.  If they were tracing the source of the 0157 it wouldn't matter where they are doing the tests but they are not.

All of their policies are this blatant against little plants.  This one is just quantifiable by their numbers.