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rickgthf
Senior Advisor

Re: Bell's palsy

Scientists think that a viral infection makes the facial nerve swell or become inflamed. You are most likely to get Bell's palsy if you are pregnant, diabetic or sick with a cold or flu.

Three out of four patients improve without treatment. With or without treatment, most people begin to get better within 2 weeks and recover completely within 3 to 6 months.

sam1wiseone
Senior Contributor

Re: Bell's palsy

99+% get better after covid.  Most just a few days of allergy symptoms.   Old fat people like you Rick dont fair as well, so get as many shots as you can.  Maybe go on a diet.

rickgthf
Senior Advisor

Re: But 2% die, entirely unnecessarily, ...

 ... for the want of two $20 shots.  2% of 7.5 billion is only 150 million.

WCMO
Senior Advisor

Re: But 2% die, entirely unnecessarily, ...

Depends greatly on where you are located, what time period you're looking at, what demographic is being considered, and how much testing has been done during those same periods of time -- all-time Covid case fatality rates currently appear to range from 0.1% in Laos, to 19.1% in Yemen, with a worldwide average of 2.0%.  The US all-time Covid case fatality rate currently appears to be 1.6%, which also varies significantly by state, AND all of these all-time statistics obviously include the period before vaccines became available.  For example -- While the NY all-time Covid case fatality rate is 2.2%, it is reported as only 0.8% for the past month -- Florida's all-time Covid case fatality rate is 1.6%, yet is reported as 5.6% for the past month.

There is also a significant difference between dying FROM covid as opposed to dying WITH covid, and not sure the statistics are able to make this distinction.

Furthermore, if you have even a 20% chance of contracting Covid, an estimate, and a 1.6% chance of dying from Covid if infected, then your general chance of contracting and dying from Covid is 0.2 * 0.016 = .003, or 0.3%.  Thus, your current odds of NOT contracting and then dying from Covid are around 1 - 0.003 = .997, or 99.7%.  And, again, these case fatality stats are based on the all-time stats which include the period before vaccines were available.

rickgthf
Senior Advisor

Re: Only 2% and yet ....

... Covid continues to relentlessly reach into every community and take some.  It's not rare anymore to know someone has been seriously ill or even died of it.

  2% is one out of every 50 people.  It's not hard at all to visualize  50 neighbors, 50 members of your church, or 50 people at the town board meeting and imagine one of them being the next victim.

  You need to stop thinking of the 49 out of 50 who survives and think instead about the 1 out 50 who doesn't.

rickgthf
Senior Advisor

Re: This idea of dying "with" Covid as opposed to ...

... dying "from" is completely wrongheaded.  About 10% of the people in this country have diabetes but they don't often "die" from diabetes.  People with diabetes can live long, useful, and productive lives.  But if they contract coronavirus their chances of being seriously ill or dying is about 30%.  They didn't suddenly get sick and die from diabetes, they died from Covid. 

  The same is true of the other major risk factors for serious illness or death from Covid.  People don't just die from being overweight but if they are overweight, their risk of a serious case of Covid is much higher.

 You're just using co-morbidities as an excuse for their unnecessary deaths.  Control the spread of coronavirus by getting most people vaccinated and the risk of death for diabetics practically disappears.

sam1wiseone
Senior Contributor

Re: This idea of dying "with" Covid as opposed to ...

The vac doesn't control the spread, you need to stop with that myth.

rickgthf
Senior Advisor

Re: "Doesn't control the spread"? That's just not true.

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#rates-by-vaccine-status  It's not perfect but far better at controlling transmission than the unvaccinated.

rickgthf
Senior Advisor

Re: "Doesn't control the spread"? That's just not true.

Compare new cases for the relatively unvaccinated Florida to the relatively vaccinated New York

rickgthf
Senior Advisor

Re: "Doesn't control the spread"? That's just not true.

Notice the difference vaccination made?  It's obvious!  Last winter,new cases in NY & FL peaked out about the same,18,000 per day.  In August, New York plateaued at 5,000 while Florida went right back up to 20+ thousand.