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Veteran Advisor

First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??

Anyone taking bets about what will happen next? Or will any more countries go through what Tunisia and Egypt have.

 

Yemen, 3 days of protests

Yemeni police have clashed with anti-government protesters demanding political reform and the resignation of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in the third straight day of anti-government protests.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2011/02/13/yemen-protests.html#ixzz1Dtle6JTs

 

Algieria 

The organizers of a pro-reform protest that brought thousands of Algerians onto the streets of the capital over the weekend called Sunday for another rally next week.

The Coordination for Democratic Change in Algeria — an umbrella group for human rights activists, unionists, lawyers and others — has called for the Feb. 19 demonstrations to take place throughout the country.

Saturday's rally — which came a day after an uprising in Egypt toppled that country's autocratic ruler — took place only in the capital, Algiers.



Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2011/02/13/algeria-protests-124.html#ixzz1Dtm8p3uU

 

Where else are there protests about to happen and will any more be successful in changing government?

54 Replies
Senior Contributor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??

I was thinking and hoping this would encourage the younger generation in Iran to speak out once again.  I'm just happy we don't have the Bush administration in office now as I would worry about us sticking our noses into certain countries business such as Iran in hopes of promoting Democracy.  I think it is best if we just stay clear and let things happen at their own pace.

I have to wonder if some countries like Iran have not tried to limit or censor the news coverage of Egypt's revolution?  Be interesting to see how various countries including China report on the Egypt story.

Veteran Advisor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??

Good thought on how some may be limiting news coverage. Will watch for info on that.

Just found this story and map on where protests are/have been happening.

Have to wonder how Libya has remained quiet too. It is from Feb 5.

MAP: Protests spread in Arab world

http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2011/01/26/f-unrest-north-africa-middle-east.html

Senior Contributor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??


@dagwud wrote:

I was thinking and hoping this would encourage the younger generation in Iran to speak out once again.  I'm just happy we don't have the Bush administration in office now as I would worry about us sticking our noses into certain countries business such as Iran in hopes of promoting Democracy.  I think it is best if we just stay clear and let things happen at their own pace.

I have to wonder if some countries like Iran have not tried to limit or censor the news coverage of Egypt's revolution?  Be interesting to see how various countries including China report on the Egypt story.


Iran is not worried, they already went through this. The lead protesters have all be arrested or beheaded while our president said it is non of our business. He should have done the same in Egypt. Iran has a greater hand in what is going on then anyone is willing to admit. Radical islam is about to swallow the entire middle east.

Senior Contributor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??

How's this for a new twist.  Do crooked Wall Street bankers have some responsibility for helping to cause these recent uprisings?  I heard one person say on TV yesterday that these revolts were mainly the result of high unemployment and poverty levels in these countries and that possibly the recent global recession helped to be the straw that broke the camel's back.  So maybe these weren't greedy bankers at all but well intentioned people who were out to make the world a better place for the poor people around the world? 

Veteran Advisor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??

  Dagwud, look the debt levels of Egypt and who it is paid to. All the "aid" money that we give them is mostly to buy our military equipment, with some economic aid too. I wonder if that number (aid to them and other countries in a similar way) is counted in our "defense spending".

  Dictatorships always rely on a military to enforce their will, and the foreign policy folks believe in corporate-democracy, where the military enforces strict control over the actions of U.S. based corporations. The same foreign policy folks don't want democracy in it's best form because it dilutes their control over the economy to enforce money into certain areas. There's a certain well connected company that moves in when dictators sellout their own country, and they like to privatize basic government services like water treatment, then extract their profits from the citizens and they do it with the dictator's enforce arm(the military), and Haliburton is just one company. All that is usually done in a tradeoff for economic loans.

Veteran Advisor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??

"Radical Islam is about to swallow the entire Middle East"???????  All those people protesting the Egyptian govt are radicals??  I thought this was what bush invaded Iraq for--to have democracy busting out all over the Middle East!  Yet you see it as one more opportunity to slam a man you hate.  Our president was right if he said "none of our business".  We don't need to invade another country to secure the flow of oil.  Let these countries seek their own level and keep us out of it.

Senior Contributor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??

On radical Islam taking over the entire Middle East. What happened in Egypt is the exact opposite of what a true radical, Osama Bin Ladin, stands for. Did Egypt change their regime through terrorism, violence and the use of weapons of mass destruction? Did Egypt attempt to completely undermine their governments financial structure? No, they tried a different route that Bin Ladin and his two Egyptian lackies (Atta and the other one) that were involved in 911 tried.

 

I think some people have either not paid attention to what radical Islam is or they just don't know in the first place. It could be that their definition of radical Islam is simply anyone who is a Muslim.

Veteran Advisor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??


@KNAPPer wrote:

On radical Islam taking over the entire Middle East. What happened in Egypt is the exact opposite of what a true radical, Osama Bin Ladin, stands for. Did Egypt change their regime through terrorism, violence and the use of weapons of mass destruction? Did Egypt attempt to completely undermine their governments financial structure? No, they tried a different route that Bin Ladin and his two Egyptian lackies (Atta and the other one) that were involved in 911 tried.

 

I think some people have either not paid attention to what radical Islam is or they just don't know in the first place. It could be that their definition of radical Islam is simply anyone who is a Muslim.


The situation in that area goes beyond any 'ism' or group of beliefs.

You are correct in pointing out that the changes are being brought about by the people without much violence except maybe violence from the existing government.

Violence does not work, at least for very long and those who support people who use violence will be tainted with the same reputation.

 

And the news this morning continues to cover the winds of change through out the Mid East area. Iran, Bahrain and Yemen......

"Yemenis scuffled with police Tuesday as thousands marched in the capital for a fifth consecutive day in Egypt-inspired protests demanding political reforms and the ouster of the country's U.S.-allied president."



Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2011/02/15/yemen-protests-saleh.html#ixzz1E28s31Pr

 

Veteran Advisor

Re: First Tunisia, the Egypt now ??

  Hey Canuck, you're right about the violence. But you must remember that weapons or specifically guns aren't easily available there, mainly because it would weaken the dictatorship. If there were some weapons available, more than likely they would have been conveniently placed by some outside source. So, they protest because that is their only weapon available. If you notice though the internet and various social media was cut off and it was done by a joint Israeli/American company with the technology developed specifically in Israel. The protestors know that if they take on the military they will lose, and if it gets to the point where they make any progress whatsoever, outside groups will re-fortify their military, or create incidents to justify a swift and violent response. The leaders there have either ignored their laws, changed them, or just totally done away with them. The foreign policy folks that put Mubareck in power and propped him up are the same scum that forced the Patriot Act upon us, with all the wiretapping and such, including the suspension at-will of Habeas Corpus, torture, etc., etc.

 

  Here's an article that tells about some sabotage to a couple of gas lines, that was probably going to be used for justification for a military response, and also notice which line wasn't damaged.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110205/wl_afp/egyptpoliticsunrestgasisrael

 

Israel, Jordan gas cut after Egypt pipeline attack

 

CAIRO (AFP) – Saboteurs attacked an Egyptian gas pipeline to Jordan on Saturday, forcing authorities to switch off supplies from a twin pipeline to Israel, an official said, as anti-regime protests raged in Cairo.

Attackers used explosives against the pipeline in the town of Lihfen in northern Sinai, near the Gaza Strip, the official told AFP. It was initially thought the pipeline to Israel was targeted.

"The pipeline to Jordan has been attacked and the supply to Israel has been cut off," the official said.

 

http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/02/12/egyptian-intifada-did-israel-have-a-hand-in-egypts-internet-...

 

Egyptian Intifada: Did Israel have a hand in Egypt’s Internet blackout?

 

Now reports have emerged in the Hebrew- and Arabic-language press that the Mubarak regime had sought Israel’s help in imposing the Internet blackout. On February 9, Egyptian Arabic-language news website Youm al-Sabea, citing reports in Hebrew-language daily Yedioth Ahronoth published the same day, asserted that the Egyptian regime had “requested the assistance of Israeli technicians to disrupt Egypt’s Internet network with the aim of quelling the revolution.”

The Youm al-Sabea report reads:

Israeli newspaper Yedioth Ahronoth has revealed that the Egyptian [Mubarak] regime used cutting-edge Israeli techniques to disrupt Internet connectivity throughout Egypt, preventing Egyptians from accessing the Internet for the first week of the Tahrir Revolution, which began on January 25.

The newspaper, in its economy supplement, reported that Egypt’s ruling regime had been forced to request the assistance of Israeli technicians to disrupt Egypt’s Internet network with the aim of quelling the revolution by thousands of demonstrators who assembled in [Cairo's] Tahrir Square late last month to demand…Mubarak’s ouster.

Yedioth Ahronoth cited statements by a high-level communications source who said that the Israeli software company Narus had designed the advanced software used to paralyze the Internet in Egypt. The newspaper noted that the Israeli company has had a longstanding relationship with Egypt’s largest public-sector company for communications and Internet services [this presumably refers to government-owned TE Data, see below], with which it provides additional special systems.

The Israeli company also provides similar services to communications companies in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, and is specialized in the production of supercomputers used by intelligence agencies worldwide for numerous applications, such as phone-taps; tracking voice communications on the Internet [presumably Skype, see below]; recording email and browsing habits; and disrupting Internet connectivity in any country at any time if needed.

Israeli dailies Yedioth Ahronoth and Haaretz both pointed to the fact that Israeli President Shimon Peres indirectly admitted the veracity of these reports at Israel’s annual security conference in Hertzliya on Tuesday, where he noted that, despite the restrictions and surveillance that governments are able to impose on the Internet, the media and Internet nevertheless played major roles in the eruption of popular uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia.