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Senior Advisor

How sad is it?

That our returning troops may not have a job to come home to?

 

What is the key to the production of new jobs or the renewal of old jobs?

 

Cutting peoples salaries is not the solution. We need thousands of good paying jobs so that people have money to spend. That would do more for businesses than anything else.

 

 

10 Replies
Senior Contributor

Re: How sad is it?

How do we get these private sector jobs for our toops that will be returning? What must be done?

Senior Advisor

Re: How sad is it?

I don't know tiller. that is why i was asking.

Senior Contributor

Re: How sad is it?

I don't know the answer to your question but I do know that reenergizing labor unions is not going to do it.  I wonder too how much of an impact our litigious society has on business expansion in this country.  Trial lawyers seem to be circling like sharks. 

Senior Contributor

Re: How sad is it?

One way would be to shop at Sears.  Reportedly they treated their military employees very well.   I have read a report that said Sears was one of the top 50 military friendly employers.  Trouble is the article never listed the other companies and I would like to see more press awarded these companies just as I would like to see heartless companies also more exposed in the press.  Let the media invoke their own form of Scarlet Letter to be worn by companies that treat their employees poorly.

 

I'll nominate this company as one of my top 50 bad companies.

 

Man Says He Was Fired After Telling Employer His Wife Has Cancer

Senior Advisor

Re: How sad is it?

Have you been sued alot of times? I never have. I suppose it might be because I do not do things to cheat or harm other people.

 

Just saying.

Senior Contributor

Re: How sad is it?

Never been sued.  I have been solicited several times in the last few years to join class action lawsuits against a variety of companies that I didn't even know had harmed me in some way.  I didn't join.  Do you think the drug companies that seem to be targets for trial attorneys based on the tv commercials try to cheat or harm other people?  I don't think so but you probably do.

Senior Contributor

Re:it is simple

lower investment taxes and eliminate gov positions by the thousands---here we have 3 epa goons for 15000 people--in our business we are faced with new inspectors yearly--due to way too many deGREED grads who will not work so the gov hires them-and tells them to create havoc in business -----eliminate ssi disability and out them to work this will eliminate illegal democrats from mexico--now tell me why this wont work

Senior Contributor

Re: How sad is it?

I was sued once for buying a combine from a farmer who turns out never owned it.  Sad part was I did a lien search on the guy which came back with the name of a finance company.   I called the company and told them I was looking at buying this particular combine and asked if they had any financial interest in it to which they answered by saying they could not tell me.  I told them I did not want to know any particulars about it or if the farmer was behind on payments or how much he owed but I simply wanted to know if they had any financial interest in this combine I was seriously thinking of buying from a private farmer who claimed he owned it.  They still refused to answer my simple question or tell me the farmer did not own the combine. 

 

When I then questioned the farmer he claimed he bought the combine new but owed the finance company one last payment that was due in a couple of months and he would make it right after he cashed our check.  The five year old combine had low hours, it and the two heads were just what we were looking for, it was in excellent condition and the asking price was very attractive.   After conferring with our attorney and banker it was advise that we make our check out to John Doe / X Brand Finance Company.   When we told the farmer we would only buy the combine this way he said no problem so we bought the combine. 

 

A couple of months later I got a call from the finance company wanting to know if we now had this particular combine which I replied yes we had recently bought.   They then informed me they owned the combine and the farmer had only been leasing it and was nine months late with last year's least payment and they had been unsuccessful in collecting it.   They said the farmer's lease included an option to buy at the end of the lease but the farmer had never exercised the option.  We were told if we did not turn the combine over to them we would be sued.

 

Long story short the farmer had a fake stamp made up with the credit company's name and stamped the back of our check with it plus endorsed it with his signature and cashed it at his local bank.  Turns out his bank never should have accepted the check as it was presented to them as all financial companies stamps will use a more thorough stamp that contains some mention about for deposit only into their account.  Also turns out our banker and attorney made a mistake by advising us to use a  instead of the word and between the farmer's name and the finance company's name on our check.   This prevented us from going back on the farmer's bank even though they admitted their teller never should have cashed the check as presented. 

 

It took two years of which I did most of the legal and foot work myself but it was finally resolved to my satisfaction.   We ended up paying off the farmer's debt on the combine to the finance company and then I went to sheriff's office in the county where the farmer lived and filed a criminal complaint.   My attorney wanted us to sue the farmer and force a sheriff's auction but after I did some research and learned the farmer had recently divorced, quit farming and already owed two other people over $45,000 I decided to try my luck in criminal court.  I had to constantly keep on the county attorney who kept dragging his feet on going after the farmer.  The county attorney kept giving me bogus excuses for not pressing charges like it was not illegal to owe people money and that combines did not have registrations like cars do so it is harder to prove in court the sale of the combine was illegal even though the dealer and the finance company had all the legally signed lease agreements and buy out contract which was never exercised.

 

I went against my attorney's advice and sent a letter to the president of AGCO as it was a Gleaner combine leased to the farmer while still new.  My attorney said it would be a waste of time and the best I would get is a letter from a secretary saying sorry but there is nothing we can do.  The credit company had shown no desire to make any type of deal with us and instead wanted us to turn over the combine or make the farmer's last lease payment plus the option to buy payment plus any late fees and interest charges that had accrued.  But after I contacted the president of AGCO the finance company agreed to accept his late fee and buy out option price and waived all penalties and interest charges.  

 

I was finally forced to contact the state's ombudsman's office after a year of dealing with a county attorney who thought this was no big deal and showed little interest in pressing charges against the farmer.  The ombudsman's office must have contacted the county attorney as he called me within  a couple of days saying he was now going to be pressing charges on the farmer for bank fraud.  As part of agreement to stay out of jail the farmer plead guilty to 2 of 4 charges and had to make full restitution including paying my legal fees, my additional payments made on the combine,  and interest on my money.  

 

I even got lucky and made $500 on the deal as my insurance agent said I could turn in a claim for fraud and it would be covered up to $500 under my home owner's policy since I bought the combine with a personal check.  This was all new to me.  Checking further my agent and I learned the insurance company would have even paid my attorney fees if I had notified then before retaining his services.  Two years later when talking with my insurance agent one day he asked how I came out on the combine and I told him I got all my money back plus interest and gas mileage.   I asked him if I would need to repay the insurance company the $500 they had paid me.  My agent smiled and said to forget about it. 

 

So yes one can be sued even when not breaking any laws and doing what they believe is the right thing.   It still bugs me the finance company allowed us to go ahead and buy the combine just so they could go after us hoping to have better luck collecting their money.   I never have understood while they never went to the farmer's place which was at the same address he listed on his lease contact and legally confiscated the combine which was worth more then double what they would get buy collecting the last lease payment and the option to buy amount. 

 

It also bugged me that after a year after I had filed a complaint with the sheriff's office and had spoken numerous times with the county attorney and had given them both all the information I had learned about the case that no one ever called the implement dealer who leased the combine in the first place.  He had told me the farmer came in one day after being contacted while trying to collect his late lease payment and told the dealer he had no intentions of making the payments.   It was as if the county attorney had no knowledge of equiptment leases and option to buy contracts and did not care to learn about them or hear the dealer's account of the case.   It was enough to make one frustrated with our legal system.

Senior Advisor

Re: How sad is it?

Usually those class action claims against drug companies have already determined that the companies are liable. The lawyers are soliciting victims that they wish to represent.

 

Are you saying that drug companies are innocent and don't have good lawyers. People that win civil suits usually have the powerr of persuasion on their side. People or companies that lose have weak arguments for the most part.

 

People that complain about trial lawyers do so without considering there are trial lawyers on the other side. I'm certain most insurance companies or drug companies can afford talented representation. Often times those companies know they have negative results from their product but elect to ignore the  problems becasuse it would cost too much money to take the products off the shelf.