cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
dagwud
Senior Contributor

Re: And another thing, Bruce.

I see my neighbors collected $3,993,776 in farm payments in the last 14 years.   That explains how they keep buying all that new fancy equiptment and putting up bigger bins then any grain elevators around.  I see the top 10% farmers in Iowa averages $31,450 a year in farm payments while the bottom 80% averages $1517 a year.  I understand and respect your consistency Don on how the rich should pay more in income taxes but when it comes to the farm program you seem to favor the rich.  I'm sure you will say that these mega farmers should simply pay a higher income tax rate but I still wonder why our government should be giving any farmers that kind of money in the first place.

kraft-t
Senior Advisor

Re: And another thing, Bruce.

The laws are as they are. There is nothing illegal about complying with the law. However, there can be valid arguments why specific laws are unjust or unfair.

 

I agree that there should be no direct payments. Only price supports that are offered as they are needed. Farmers selling 200 bushel corn at $5 should not be getting direct payments.

tomtoolbag
Veteran Advisor

Re: And another thing, Bruce.

  Yes, bankers may require that the applicable subsidy money be used, and CPAs may apply the applicable deductions, just as they would verify the ones that were utilized. But, $285,000+ p/y average is A LOT of scratch that ANY business would love to have for just one year. Look at the amount of bankruptcies that maybe wouldn't happen with that kind of cash infusion.

  But, it's all perfectly legal and until it's not, people will use it. It reminds me of those two words that I must hear, to decide whether or not I'm going to a wedding and/or wedding reception for an annoying relative or casual friend of my other half.

  OPEN BAR

Canuck_2
Veteran Advisor

Re:permits Tom

Being in a rural area we can 'get away' with some things that are against some bylaw somewhere but building permits are pretty hard to sneak through on most sites.

Had a neighbour who got a load of lumber dropped off beside his house for a new deck. Inspector happened to drive by and saw the pile. No construction took place until after they got their permit. Permits usally do not take long to get unless it is a large 'complicated' building.

Have a mixed opinion on the permits, on one hand it is good that someone (as long as that someone has adequate training) is looking over the shoulder of some contractors. On the other hand it is kind of a bother for some simple construction projects when ever step has to wait on an inspector to check.

That said we are just ready to move into a new shop, it is getting an epoxy floor spread today and tomorrow. We started last fall and the inspector has been good since we were doing most of the work ourselves he has made suggestions and taken the time to tell us what we had to do and what we can not do.

40X80 insulated workshop permit cost us $815, we will get $100 back when he writes up the final papers before Sept 1 because that is the anniversary date of the permit. After that and we forfeit the $100.

Seems like a lot of $$ but he has been on site a number of times and several to suit our schedule as he checked excavation, concrete etc. other stops were because he was in the area. So I know his time and travel cost the tax payer and since it is my building I should pay.

Would have to go back and check but think cost of permit was based on area of building and cost(???) but of course there is a minimum which would impact small projects more.

There are rules about things like lawns, cleanliness and even clotheslines in some urban areas sometimes specific to a subdivision. One of our daughters has a house in a subdivision which has a no clothesline regulation. When they were deciding to build there, an acquaitance who also lived there said do not worry most houses have a clothesline and he did not think they dared tell everyone to take them down.

13 years later and she still has her clothesline. 

Canuck_2
Veteran Advisor

Re: electrical permits, Dagwud

Need an electrical permit here too but I never bother for 'repair' work.

New building we wired ourselves from panel on. That is permitted but we still had to have inspection of rough wiring and final finished project.

My qualified electrician did a check for me just to be sure before inspector was called.

Canuck_2
Veteran Advisor

Re: increased taxes hobby

have not heard of that but could understand how it might happen.

Our property taxes are supposed to be based on a 'fair market value'

A few years ago land prices increased considerably and a couple of sales near me, one was my next door neighbour buying the farm on the other side of him for a premium price because it was worth more to him.

That caused my taxes to increase 60% on a couple of bare land properties and only 40% on our home farm with buildings. Maybe that is the reason. When I tear down the old swine barn next year my taxes may rise too. Farms with swine buildings on them are at a disadvantage to sell, lower price.

tomtoolbag
Veteran Advisor

Re: Re:permits Tom

  I know exactly what you mean about the permit costs. I kind of think of it as a sales tax on house improvements and upgrades. I pay thousands a year in fees, and then pay again in property taxes, and have lobbied to get multiple permit fees reduced with some success. Why should I have to pay it on both ends when the increased assessment means that I will pay more anyway?

  A lot of people don't realize that things like electrical work are driven by the power company. Electrical work is very dangerous and requiring that qualified people do the work is valid because not everybody works safely or by the standards, simply because they may not know them.

  The inspections and fees aren't really justified sometimes because of the lack of technical expertise of the person that oversees the proposed plans and drawings, not to mention that the inspectors compensation cost is paid many times over by various people.  I spend A LOT of time doing drawings to submit for approval with the accompanying data to prove the performance to over-compensate for the person reviewing those drawings and have them simply disagree "because that's not the way they used to do it". They have no technical data to back up their position, but it is what it is. I recently submitted for approval some HVAC equipment to the natural gas company. They were paying a $100.00 rebate for new equipment that was 62% efficient, and $300-$400 for a high efficiency boiler, but it's too big for what is needed, and I am installing a combo hot water and heating system that is 30% higher in efficiency, but they didn't pay anything for in rebates. The houses are sometimes so small that with the combination of super-insulation and the minimal need for demand, simple and normal conventional systems never run long enough to hit their peak efficiency, because they are so over-sized. They did agree and offered a rebate for quite an amount because of the initial cost of the equipment and the long term reduction in demand. Just to get the building department to also approve that, along with the gas company was approximately 100 hours of work and data collection and the presentation of such. It helps but it also showed how reluctant people are to change. 

  Don't even get me started on Homeowner's Associations. Man, what a bunch of BS.

tomtoolbag
Veteran Advisor

Re: Farmers pay house taxes too, you Ignoramus!

  hobbyfarm, here in IL. the way farms are assessed for property taxes is VERY complicated. I don't make the claim that I know or that I understand or agree with their assessments, but, due to the potentially low value of the building, removing that could bring the value of the property back up or into a different use.

  I THINK, as I don't build or erect bins, that any permanent building that would be erected on any property, with the size, weight and conditions of the the use of it pertaining to the weather cycles, you would more than likely need a permit that would include inspections. But, I'm the wrong person to ask because I'm not  experienced in the complex farm property tax codes and restrictions or use of it in IL.

  As Canuck said, due to nearby sales of property and the step up in value, property taxes usually rise. I have yet to see them go down also. I have seen a condo that the surrounding condos all sold at least once, some of them more than that, in the last ten years and the property taxes doubled because of the constant step ups in values. Now, those same properties have dropped in value, and the one or two people that stayed put face an outrageous tax bill. It seems as though the various taxing bodies are quick to acknowledge the increase in value, and demand the corresponding taxes, but play dumb now when the value has dropped, and are reluctant to reassess the property.

BA Deere
Senior Contributor

Hobby, you could`ve said

"Farmers only do things as well as they do because of alot of support from machinery workers, elevator workers, chemcial workers, truckers, barge workers, ect ect ect.."  in response to my old American farmer quote and I would agree, because that is what I think. I was trying to provoke the thought that farmers are not second class, cry babies. Do you ever wonder why the communists on here Love you? It`s because when a Conservative farmer talks sense about wild spending you call him a hypocrite because of subsidies. I once saw a tv show about a precinct of dirty cops on the take, except one cop. The dirty cops had deposited money into the Good cop`s checking account to make her look dirty and she couldn`t report the corruption without implicating herself in the process. When you go on your soap box about hypocrite farmers, I always think of that tv show. Instead believing you found the "Lost Ark of the Covenant" with that "hypocrite" crap. Why don`t you call out the communists with their hypocracy?......I know, I know where would you begin? Smiley Happy  

dagwud
Senior Contributor

I'm curious Tom

I see recently on the news that Americans are starting to opt for smaller new homes reversing a trend of preferring more square feet for the last couple of decades.  I'm curious Tom if you are seeing that trend in your area?