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bruce MN
Advisor

In Minnesota yesterday

http://www.dglobe.com/event/apArticle/id/DA3DOB7O0/

 

Just got done reading about a preson who has interviewed a number of people in The Valley who are descendants of settlers who were victims of the conflict who aren't "all good" with this. 

 

It is said that "Nothing lasts forever", but us country folk who deeply treasure our personal heritage do seem to do all we can to see that it lasts as long as it can..  I'm not comfortable at all with what they've done in Mankato, whereas my generally liberal views on so may things should probably have me celebrating it.

 

Not to blame the Dakota.  They were so stirred up, starved out and incited by the fascists running the agencies and programs that they can't necessarily be.  But horrible things did go down.

4 Replies
Milligan Hay - Iowa d:^)
Veteran Advisor

Re: In Minnesota yesterday

How many of the white settlers got killed in the uprising in Minnesota? We're any of them your kin? Did the building of the railroad through your valley have anything to do with the uprising? Maybe the railroads came through much later.
Red Steele
Veteran Advisor

Re: In Minnesota yesterday

Milligan, these events happened in my back yard and are the subject of quite a few probably obscure books, but I have read several because of the close proximity.  Like in most cases, there is enough guilt to go around, and neither side emerges as the true good guys. After 150 years, it is time for forgiveness and moving on , from both sides.

 

From what I read, the uprising in Minnesota actually had a early tremor in your Iowa, by the great lakes. By the resort Okoboji lakes, there is a small museum and plague that denotes the Spirit Lake killings, that went unpunished. This happened a few years before Minnesota, and was one reason the Sioux were convinced that the white men were weak, and would run if enough force was shown.

 

During the civil war, the officials responsible for distributing the money and goods to the Native Americans evidently failed to timely give them food and money, and possible screwed them with inedible meat and spoiled flour and other provisions.  Native Americans were hungry and starving and ready for a spark to drive them to do what may not have otherwise happened.

 

If you enjoy history, you may wish to google the Minnesota Sioux Uprising and see what you find....it started a many decades long war that didn't end until after Custer, and the massacres of the Sioux that came after Custers killing. The Crazy Horse museum in the Black Hills has a plethora of materials about this.

 

With history, we all know that the story told depends on who is doing the telling. I have an analytical mind, and I have long reasoned that most of the Indians that were hung were not the really guilty ones since the avenue to ride to Canada with Little Crow was open to them. All Indians probably looked alike , too, just like any other ethnic group and I would never rely much on eyewitness accounts.

 

The men , women and children that never did a single act of violence paid the price too, as they were herded into camps where about a quarter died.  In at least one incident, as the Indians were herded to a camp in the twin cities, an Indian mother had her infant snatched and killed by angry white folks.

 

I don't think any of those folks were hung in a public spectacle, either.

Red Steele
Veteran Advisor

Every Storm Runs out of Rain

bruce MN
Advisor

Re: In Minnesota yesterday

No kin but we certainly do know people who had kin who were affected.  My mother's maternal side of the family was one of the first to settle where they did, 1840s,  well south of the area where the Dakota conflict played out, and our handed down stuff is about freindly Indians and of travelling soldiers on their way to the places where there were forts.

 

The tracks laid across most of praire Minnesota like a bowl of spaghetti 75 years ago or more.  Not sure what went in when.  It was the grants along stretches of the big lines that made for the carried forward  fortunes.  Not sure what was under development at the time of the uprising.  I think it was more that the settlers had found the land to be productive and valuable and there was great opportunity about to break up more of it and that would take expanded settlement which always would be followed by banks and merchants and churches and such.  The indian agencies were full of clergymen and missionaries and entrepnuers and even accomplis journalists who saw $ signs, full buckboards and full collection plates at the end of the rainbow and it was "them what stirred up the savages".

 

 As it usually is, no different that Mike huckabee, the Koch boys and Limabugh tying your shorts in a knot and you coming on here telling us that it's going to be the end of the world as we know it.  For those  settlers who lived and died in that conflict it probably looked that way too. And for some it was.