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rawhide
Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics

If they are dumping nitrogen loaded tailwater and I have to assume they are then where in the hell are the EPA boys? Also, if the EPA was told to look the other way who told them?  Sounds like a cover-up to me.  Where is the media? Are they being told to look the other way? Who told the media to look the other way?

bruce MN
Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics

Virtually every ag producer in the Mississippi River Basin is doing essentially that and nobody is doing anything meaningful or effective to stop it.  

 

Becasue of supposed "conservative" libertarian politics.  And the sugar boys make te parrot cages that are the ag commodity groups and the AFB look lke kindergartners.

 

What a crazy question 

r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics


@bruce MN wrote:

Virtually every ag producer in the Mississippi River Basin is doing essentially that and nobody is doing anything meaningful or effective to stop it.  

 

Becasue of supposed "conservative" libertarian politics.  And the sugar boys make te parrot cages that are the ag commodity groups and the AFB look lke kindergartners.

 

What a crazy question 


Then the government needs to buy all the land to make sure it is used correctly.

hardnox
Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics

But the burdens on us are already intolerable.

 

I guess the deep background on my thoughts on the topic is my sincere belief that the farm bill should have been primarily targetted at buffering every single stream and ditch with a carrot and stick approach. Carrot being very fair diversion payments, stick being penalties for not participating.

 

In recent history farm groups have been relatively happy with that approach because the stick part presumes that they're still getting subsidies that can be withdrawn for non-compliance.

 

There are a lot of interesting things about the farm bill that was written in a backroom by lobbyists and staffers who hope to become lobbyists. The two "stakeholder groups" that traditionally support the conservation titles were very effectively neutralized. The libs were rocked onto their heels by the attack on nutrition program while the sportsman groups went missing- presumably all locked in various arsenals waiting for Obama to come take their guns and ammo.

r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics


@hardnox wrote:

But the burdens on us are already intolerable.

 

I guess the deep background on my thoughts on the topic is my sincere belief that the farm bill should have been primarily targetted at buffering every single stream and ditch with a carrot and stick approach. Carrot being very fair diversion payments, stick being penalties for not participating.

 

In recent history farm groups have been relatively happy with that approach because the stick part presumes that they're still getting subsidies that can be withdrawn for non-compliance.

 

There are a lot of interesting things about the farm bill that was written in a backroom by lobbyists and staffers who hope to become lobbyists. The two "stakeholder groups" that traditionally support the conservation titles were very effectively neutralized. The libs were rocked onto their heels by the attack on nutrition program while the sportsman groups went missing- presumably all locked in various arsenals waiting for Obama to come take their guns and ammo.


Almost every city and town in the country dump raw sewage into the river every time they get a flooding rain. No one seems to show a whole lot of concern for that.

hardnox
Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics

That's a significant portion of the infrastructure work that needs to be done although somebody's going to have to pay for it.

 

But I think it is pretty clear that agriculture is the largest contributor of nutrient in the Mississippi watershed.  Buffers aren't going to eliminate that by any means but they're the most practical way to reduce it.

 

Saying that Jimmy did it too has been effective so far, though. I'll give you that.

bruce MN
Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics

If every non-point discharge were diluted to the degree that those events are there would be considerably less of a downstream problem.

 

But as nox says, that schtck is dogma.  Along, of course, with golf courses and urban lawn fertilizer.  Did we leave anything out?

r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics


@hardnox wrote:

That's a significant portion of the infrastructure work that needs to be done although somebody's going to have to pay for it.

 

But I think it is pretty clear that agriculture is the largest contributor of nutrient in the Mississippi watershed.  Buffers aren't going to eliminate that by any means but they're the most practical way to reduce it.

 

Saying that Jimmy did it too has been effective so far, though. I'll give you that.


The practical to reduce it is with GMO where ton upon 1,000s of tons of toxic chemicals are not needed.

r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics


@bruce MN wrote:

If every non-point discharge were diluted to the degree that those events are there would be considerably less of a downstream problem.

 

But as nox says, that schtck is dogma.  Along, of course, with golf courses and urban lawn fertilizer.  Did we leave anything out?


No. You sent it all down stream. But non of that pollution matters.

NewAgJudge
Senior Contributor

Re: Interesting story on land use and politics

 

People who elect somone like Rick Scott arent exactly concerned with the environment.