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r3020
Senior Advisor

Obama subsidies the 1%

The demrats are truly the party of the elite, by the elite, for the elite. And us peasants are forced to pay for their rich snob toys.

 

 

snip-

Crony capitalism not only is a pain in the national wallet, but products from crony capitalists pose a physical danger. Fisker Automotive — fronted by Democratic eco-millionaire Al Gore — received a half-billion federal “loan” 2 years ago to make luxury electric cars.

Not only was this a sweetheart from the Obama administration, but the deal financed the manufacture of unsafe electric lemons.

From the New York Times:

Fisker Automotive is recalling all 239 of its 2012 Karma luxury plug-in hybrid cars because of a fire hazard, according to a report filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Prices on the 2012 model start at $103,000, including the destination charge.

In a report filed recently on the agency’s Web site, Fisker said some hose clamps were not properly positioned, which could allow a coolant leak. “If coolant enters the battery compartment an electrical short could possibly occur, causing a thermal event within the battery, including a possible fire in the worse case,” the company told the safety agency.

Fisker said the problem was discovered on Dec. 16, when workers at the Valmet Automotive assembly plant in Finland noticed coolant dripping. Fisker said it was not aware of any consumer complaints, warranty claims or “any other reports related to this condition.” It said fewer than 50 vehicles were in the hands of consumers.

So for $529 million, taxpayers received less than 50 automobiles sold (apparently) to people who can afford the $89,000 sticker price. The New York Times report failed to mention Al Gore’s connection to this dubious enterprise, but a Wall Street Journal on September 25, 2009, did:

WASHINGTON — A tiny car company backed by former Vice President Al Gore has just gotten a $529 million U.S. government loan to help build a hybrid sports car in Finland that will sell for about $89,000.

The award this week to California start-up Fisker Automotive Inc. follows a $465 million government loan to Tesla Motors Inc., purveyors of a $109,000 British-built electric Roadster. Tesla is a California start-up focusing on all-electric vehicles, with a number of celebrity endorsements that is backed by investors that have contributed to Democratic campaigns.

The awards to Fisker and Tesla have prompted concern from companies that have had their bids for loans rejected, and criticism from groups that question why vehicles aimed at the wealthiest customers are getting loans subsidized by taxpayers.

Add the Chevy Volt — another fire hazard when charging — and you have a nice pipeline from the Treasury to the wallets of the FOO (Friends Of Obama).

I love these liberal imbeciles who buy this global warming crap. They are snotty as they cite “science,” which is based on what is best questionable data (in the case of the Nobel Peace Prize winning 2007 IPCC report: outright lies). They repeat Al Gore’s lines about Big Industry opposing this, when in fact Big Business pockets many an alternative energy tax credit or other subsidy.

The only green jobs are the green that goes from the taxpayer into Democratic operatives such as billionaire George “Solyndra” Kaiser and Democratic hacks like Al Gore.

 

http://blogs.dailymail.com/donsurber/archives/48924

10 Replies
KNAPPer
Senior Contributor

Re: Obama subsidies the 1%

Until we all come together to demand significant revision of the campaign process, this and worse will continue to happen with all political parties and positions. It takes BIG money to run for any office these days and us commoners are not the source of the politicians income for campaign finance. Most people just don't get this for some reason I fail to understand.

 

You want to get rid of the "elite" in politics? Make it so a common man, who is not wealthy, can run for office. As it stands now, only the elite can afford to run, gather finances and not only get in office, but stay in office. Term limits will not solve this problem, it will only get those who are already well-connected elected. Political campaigns are bought and paid for by special interests and big business at all extremes of the spectrum.

 

You want radical, wild extremes with an ever increasing divide among voters? Keep on blaming one side while supporting the other. The special interests and big money will keep supporting both sides or the side that can get them the favor they want.

hollow

Every person has the power with their own vote to change the system. No change in laws are required. All that is required is that people use the tools readily available to research candidates. Look in the mirror, who did you vote for? Change can start with you.
KNAPPer
Senior Contributor

Re: hollow

It is very obvious that we all can vote for the candidate of our choice. You know I understand that. I think your view is a veiled one that is blind to what is going on in Washington and the state legislatures across America to a smaller degree. The only candidate that will rise to anything above a wright-in vote today will be a candidate that owes many, many people, corporations, packs, legislative constituents, special interest groups, etc., etc. lots and lots of favors in return for the finances that got them there in the first place. You will not see anyone but the most wealthy and the most out of touch people rise to a level where you can vote on them to begin with. They all talk the talk that we want to hear, but behind the scenes, they will continue, once elected, to pay back favors. It is a good system that has become corrupted by lobbyist and political dogma created by lobbyists and special interests.

 

I can vote for who I want, but who I want to vote for will never be a candidate in this day and age. It takes too much money to get elected or get or even run for office for anything but corruption to happen.

 

Who I voted for became a member of this club and I don't want any more of it, yet I have no choice(s).

BA Deere
Honored Advisor

Re: hollow

It`s the whole society that we live in today Knapper.  A football player makes $10`s of millions a yr, the game tickets are too expensive for a common family to attend the games. Tom Cruise makes $50 million per picture, theaters charge $9 for tickets, yet stadiums and theaters are filled to the max.  0bama will spend $1 Billion on a campaign for a job that pays $400,000/yr.  We all complain about this stuff, yet we all comply.

KNAPPer
Senior Contributor

Re: hollow

While you have some good observations there, this is not my point. My basic beef is that the average Americans are not the people being represented. Rather the funders are the "people" being represented in reality. The only thing we are needed for are the votes.

Re: hollow

In the last presidential election there were about 5 candidates on my ballot. I knew before I went to cast a vote that the R and D candidates were owned and didn't vote for either. You, I'm guessing, voted for Obama, who anyone could look up their contribution list and easily see he was owned by special interests.    People have the ability to survey the record of their elected officials and decide for themselves if they should be reelected.  If an elected official says one thing in public then votes another way, it should be obvious.  I haven't voted for my current representive in congress for some time because I disagree with her votes.  Your complaint isn't with the system, it's with the people.  

 

Many people of modest means have been elected to public office in this country.

 

 

Re: hollow


@KNAPPer wrote:

It is very obvious that we all can vote for the candidate of our choice. You know I understand that. I think your view is a veiled one that is blind to what is going on in Washington and the state legislatures across America to a smaller degree. The only candidate that will rise to anything above a wright-in vote today will be a candidate that owes many, many people, corporations, packs, legislative constituents, special interest groups, etc., etc. lots and lots of favors in return for the finances that got them there in the first place. You will not see anyone but the most wealthy and the most out of touch people rise to a level where you can vote on them to begin with. They all talk the talk that we want to hear, but behind the scenes, they will continue, once elected, to pay back favors. It is a good system that has become corrupted by lobbyist and political dogma created by lobbyists and special interests.

 

I can vote for who I want, but who I want to vote for will never be a candidate in this day and age. It takes too much money to get elected or get or even run for office for anything but corruption to happen.

 

Who I voted for became a member of this club and I don't want any more of it, yet I have no choice(s).


Ben, It sounds like you are ready for a revolt. Perhaps the earlier one gets started, the faster and easier the new government will be to control.

 

If nothing happens to the system that is in place, something big is going to happen.  Either way, it seems, that jack boots will be marching down the streets of what was America.  They are working on autonomous robots right now that walk and move just like a giant human.  They will follow orders without question and we will be under their control.

 

This will all happen within a decade.  Mark my words.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mclbVTIYG8E


r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: hollow


@Samnospam wrote:

In the last presidential election there were about 5 candidates on my ballot. I knew before I went to cast a vote that the R and D candidates were owned and didn't vote for either. You, I'm guessing, voted for Obama, who anyone could look up their contribution list and easily see he was owned by special interests.    People have the ability to survey the record of their elected officials and decide for themselves if they should be reelected.  If an elected official says one thing in public then votes another way, it should be obvious.  I haven't voted for my current representive in congress for some time because I disagree with her votes.  Your complaint isn't with the system, it's with the people.  

 

Many people of modest means have been elected to public office in this country.

 

 



Julia Carson of IN was the perfect example. By far the poorest member of congress but was re-elected to her seat until she passed away. Why, because she proved to the members of her district she could bring home the pork.

KNAPPer
Senior Contributor

Two different things

Your idea of revolt and my idea of revolt are likely two different things. My idea of something big happening would be a constitutional convention to fix the problem. I think people just don't realize how the republic has become divided my money from special interests/the lobby and even how it works.

 

Take temporary tax cuts as an example. Bush was smarter than we think. Why didn't he and his congress make the tax cut permanent? The answer is with a temporary cut, there is an opening for special interests and lobbies to offer funding to a candidate that is likely to extend that tax cut again. If it was permanent, there is no such opportunity.

 

It's all a game with them (politicians) and they believe they are doing the right thing. It's not evil or against the law. It is a form of corruption that gets some folks what they want. There are no true "jack boots," but I understand how villainization plays an important role in some people's belief system.