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Senior Contributor

Re: most over paid profession

Nice well thought out contribution, old man. Thanks.

Senior Contributor

Re: most over paid profession

I also went to a one room school. The teacher made $100.00 a month and no pension. She had 30 students in 8 grades.

I was the first from the school to attend high school. I was 16 when I graduated.

Senior Advisor

Re: most over paid profession


@old man wrote:

I also went to a one room school. The teacher made $100.00 a month and no pension. She had 30 students in 8 grades.

I was the first from the school to attend high school. I was 16 when I graduated.


Imagine that. All before the DE was established as a cabinet level position with 5,000 employees. Just imagine what government can do with health care over the next 30 years.

Advisor

Re: Odd, how rich I am

We'll never get on the matter until district citizens and board members are in a postion where they can hire administrators who can terminate poor performing teachers much easier than they can now. That doesn't set well with lots of liberals and unionists, I know, but it hads to happen. Most genuinely grogressive leaders support that. Fluff and puff liberals don't  I guess that's among the reasons why I'd really like to be a Republican like my paternal grandfather was...way back before the Bible thumpers and cultural neandrethals took over complete control of the party.

 

As for the "farm kid" thing. I maybe have written about this before...not sure...but I had a conversatoin with a retired teacher from N.C. Iowa a couple of years ago about the "farm kids"..particularily the boys, She taught in the same elementary school for over 40 years, and subsequently was in the building with and exposed to 3 generations of "farm kids" from a number of families in the community. Said that when she started,in the 1950s (she'd come to the district from college after having been raised in the city) that she felt she had never seen anything in her life as inspirational and delightful as the little boys who came to school from the farm.  "In tune with things" I believe is what she said. ...exceptionally curious, most of them ready to read and cipher...many who could already...and intersted in what made things go. Saw many of the best of them leave town 3 generations worth, along with (she said most importantly) nearly every girl who had any talent or ambition at all, leaving those who stayed to breed with the low intellectual and curiosity dull end of the local she stock.

She still lives there and is now observing the 4th round of that. Says that the little boys come in now in one of 2 packages. Either so dull and blank eyed, so disinterested and just plain "bred down" OR, in the case of the modern BTO's (her husband was a farmer so she knows of what she speaks in that regard) boys so positive that the dumb school system has nothing to offer them. so exclusively obsessed with mechanized apparatuses and SO VERY, VERY conscious and punishingly reflective of their elevated economic status within the school and community that in either case they make teaching at the lower levels almost impossible. With both groups particlualrily scornful of and hateful acting toward the more recent influx of minority students from families that have come to work in the area since their dads and g-dads went to school and BTO farming drove away nearly everybody but the least  mobile of the locally bred white trash (much of which is comprised of later generations of former local farming and farm labor families,)

 

Thanks for bringing up that bottom 3rd of the college classes thing the other day. My hope that one thing that could come out fo the problems college grads are having finding jobs might lead to more of the best of them going into public elementary and secondary  education. Or that more good minds from business and government might move across town to teach if these new certification programs work out. But there needs to be  (unfortunately, in these times) more investment and, again, more latitude in hiring and termination. NEITHER OF WHICH fit into the current popular extreme right driven politics.

 

And not to forget, it's small school districts that are the reason for the tenure and "tough to dismiss" rules that we have. Small communities tend to be very, very coloquial and run by a handful of dominant people. Very loose democracies. And those people often tend to be clergy or patriarchs of prominent local economic elite families and all too often have agendas that have nothing to do with the education process. Thus something developed to protect the promising but "different" young teacher in a lttle Wisconsin town also gives us something that can find a big city school dstrict hiding out scores if not hundreds of total scropp teachers in rubber rooms all day long, week after week, year after year.

 

Nothing's easy...it's a damned big country. Can't be run on anecdotes and generalities.

Advisor

Re: most over paid profession

It would be wonderful to get back to small class sizes like that. What the old timers told me was that if there were 3 in each grade that the first graders had 21 teachers, the 2nd graders had 18, the 3rd 15 etc. etc. We went into town for school. Always envied my cousins and other freinds who got to go to country school. They all have considerably better old school days stories than we've got.

 

Country school boards were powerful. My Mother taught in one after the War until she got pregnant with me. No sooner that one of the kids told his or her Mom that "teacher got sick again this morning" was she approached abou her condition and was forced to quit before she started to "show". I suppose they might have been fearing that some little Jane or Johnny might come to contemplating what had cause it and would create some embarassment to someone by asking.

 

Our grandson goes to a city charter school where  grades 1-3 are shffled around in different mixes of the 3 grades during the day for different subjects, sort of like you had. His mom says it's working out great.   

Veteran Advisor

Re: Odd, how rich I am

Well in the 90s for sure and I do believe it so now, teaching applicants go before 2-3 members of the school board and the super.  After that, the recommended ones come before the entire board and talk to everyone for a few minutes.  Are you saying that the lower 3rd of a college class become teachers or that teacher candidates are always in the bottom 3rd of a class????

Veteran Advisor

Re: most over paid profession

Well, you can bet very soon if not already, class size will be out of sight because of layoffs and fewer people wishing to get into the profession because of the politics involved now.

Senior Contributor

Re: most over paid profession

No, teachers are not the most overpaid profession.I can think of a lot of people who I think are not worth as much as teachers, but get paid more. But, I am glad that I do not have to make any decisions as to who gets laid off.

I want to say that "If the checkbook is empty, then you have to either cut expenses, or increase income"

I have an unemployed grand daughter teacher. If there is no money, who will hire her. She was low on the totem pole, so she got laid off

Sometimes these events are decided by which side of the fence you are on

Senior Contributor

Re: most over paid profession

I know some things will never be the same at school.  I recall my father telling us how when he was a young boy that he and other boys would catch pocket gophers during recess at the country school.  He said they would make a loop with a string and place the loop around the gopher hole and then take the other end of the string with them as they laid down a ways away.  I seem to recall him saying they would sometimes whistle or make a noise that would cause the gophers to stick their heads up out of their holes allowing them to yank the string and hopefully catch them. 

Senior Contributor

Re: bingo

Either you can't read of don't.  I don't know which.