cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Senior Contributor

Re: Odd, how rich I am


@GreaTOne_65 wrote:

Oh, woo is you! Sour grapes, that's all! Get over it! They have worked as hard for their money as you have, fool!


 

Why don't you just copy one response to every post. Your a real sour old man. I'm glad your not in my life. I don't think I could handle your negativity and rage constantly.

 

Now to make yourself feel better just insult me and forget I wrote this.  

Senior Contributor

Re: Odd, how rich I am


@wehav wrote:

A recent school bond issue that I was against got passed.  A teacher called me names and insinuated that I didn't care about education and that I was a rich farmer.

 

So I looked up his income and property tax bill.  He and his teacher wife make $100,000 a year and live in a new 2 story house on which they pay $1500 property tax.  They both drive new cars or at least I should say cars no more than 3 years old.

 

I on the other hand make $45,000 a year, pay $5000 in property tax and my newest vehicle is a 1996.  Somehow I don't feel as though I'm rich.  Then too I made certain that my children went to college and that they graduated at the top of their classes.  We actually have a thing called a library and have several computers on a network.  We took our children to see museums, art galleries and some of the wonders of our country.  The trips were made inexpensively and we camped in a tent.  We were able to see the truth about a lot of American history and it wasn't what was being taught in the politically correct school system.

 

I am tire of teachers whining about their low pay.  I've invested my life to buy part of America, I don't have a boat, a camper or a snowmobile.  Our vacations are few and short.  Quite different from the teachers who have a few years of college that cost them less than $40,000 and who now take cruises and come back tanned after Christmas break.

 

The average teacher salary in America is $50,000 but what they don't tell you is many teacher families are 2 teachers and they don't tell you what those retirement programs pay.  It's a lot more than the rent on a 160 acre farm and it doesn't pay property tax.


 

THe sad part is the "system" is set up to protect tenured teachers. Thats it. In the end its not about the kids.

Senior Contributor

Re: Odd, how rich I am

I don't need to insult you, you do a very fine job all by yourself.

Senior Contributor

Re: Odd, how rich I am


@GreaTOne_65 wrote:

I don't need to insult you, you do a very fine job all by yourself.


Man those anger management classes are paying off. That's the shortest, least mean you've ever been to anyone on here. I'm proud of you!

Senior Contributor

Re: Odd, how rich I am

By all means, Thank you! Maybe you should try it?

Senior Contributor

Re: Odd, how rich I am

Having very intelligent people for teachers is great but I think often the problem is not that the teachers are not smart enough but that they lack in other areas such as truly caring about their students.  Our local school had a teacher last year that was chosen as teacher of the year on ABC's Regis and Kelly show.  Admittedly it was mainly a popularity contest but is does say something that a teacher from such small school can win a

national popularity contest.

 

 

Mr. Dye has been teaching English and reading at our school since 1973 starting out at grade 5 then moving up to jr. high before going on to teach high school English classes for the last 20 or so years.  Our local weekly paper has a section in it during the school year written by a staff of high school students and part of that segment highlights 3 or 4 different seniors each week.  Along with a picture of the seniors it gives a brief description of their past school activities and achievements along with asking each the same 5 or 6 questions of which one is always, "Who are your favorite teachers?"   Mr. Dye gets mentioned about 80% of the time. 

 

 

At the beginning of each new school year Mr. Dye will tell all the high school students his home and cell phone numbers and tells them they can call him day or night if they have problems or just need someone to talk to.  It is obvious being around him just how much he truly cares about the students.  He also keeps granola bars in his desk and if a student comes to his class hungry he will offer them one which i think has upset some administrators as it goes against the no eating in lass rule.

 

 

Mr. Dye has a saying that goes something to the effect of: "Kids don't want to know how much their teachers know as much as they want to know how much their teachers care."  He also has a slogan he tells his students

every day:  "Celebrate the day."

 

 

When a student was in a bad accident and in a hospital 100 miles away there was but one teacher that went  to visit him, Mr. Dye who was not even a current teacher of the student. 

 

 

Mr. Dye is not a big tough guy yet from what my children have told me he has less behavior problems with his high school students then the other teachers even though he is more lax with his students. 

 

 

I think many teachers today lack the real desire, care and commitment towards their students and often get burnt out early putting up with kids who lack respect and proper behavior skills.  To be honest if I was a teacher I'm afraid I would end up in the same boat.

 

 

I don't think they can teach caring no matter how prestigious of college you attend or how good of grades

you get while in college.

Advisor

Re: Odd, how rich I am

You're admitting our public schools are so pathetic that its products can't accomplish what any early 19th century household could?
Advisor

Re: Odd, how rich I am

BTW Bruce, my kids have a little $15 leapfrog toy/device that teaches the alphabet, phoenic sounds, and 3 letter words that anyone could use to learn to read. Cheap, but you'd have to want to learn.
Senior Contributor

Re: Odd, how rich I am

I'm just sure that is a real hands on approach to social well being. It really shows how little guidence parents want to do with their children. Maybe that's all we need in schools? A bunch of plastic toys teaching our kids how to cope in this world.

Veteran Advisor

Re: Well, Sha-zam!


@GreaTOne_65 wrote:

I'm just sure that is a real hands on approach to social well being. It really shows how little [guidance] parents want to do with their children. Maybe that's all we need in schools? A bunch of plastic toys teaching our kids how to cope in this world.

(I fixed your spelling error for you.)


With the resources of the internet, which is the world's biggest collection of knowledge, anyone can teach themselves.... anything.

 

I taught myself all three dialects of the Irish Language with the internet and computer programs.  I have also learned at least a few words of another dozen languages via the computer.  The day will soon be here when teachers will only be needed for special education purposes.... computers can easily replace most teachers in today's world.  The Fine Arts and special education are the only exceptions that I can think of.

 

This might be the only way that the educrat's iron grip of liberal indoctrination can be broken once and for all.  All of the homeschooler's kids that I know are ten times better educated than any that I know in the public (government) schools.