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BA Deere
Honored Advisor

Should we be selling beans to these guys?

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/01/china/hong-kong-national-security-law-july-1-intl-hnk/index.html

 

Here are some of the key takeaways of the law, according to a translation from Chinese state news agency Xinhua.
Those found guilty could face life in prison:
  • The law establishes four new offenses of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign powers. The maximum penalty for each is life imprisonment.
  • Activities such as damaging public transport and public services "in order to pursue political agenda" can be considered terrorism -- a provision that appears to target protesters who last year disrupted traffic and the city's infrastructure.
  • A terrorism charge can also include the vaguely worded provision of "other dangerous activities which seriously jeopardize public health, safety or security."
China can take over cases and hold secret trials with no jury:
  • The Chinese central government will establish its own law enforcement presence in Hong Kong, labeled the "Office for Safeguarding National Security."
  • A national security committee for Hong Kong will also be established, comprised of Hong Kong government officials and an adviser appointed by the Chinese central government. The group's workings "shall not be disclosed to the public," and "decisions by the committee shall not be amenable to judicial review."
  • Hong Kong's Chief Executive now has the power to appoint judges to handle cases related to national security. National security cases involving state secrets can be tried without a jury.
  • Hong Kong courts will oversee national security cases but Beijing can take over prosecution in certain circumstances, applying Chinese law and prosecution standards.
  • In these cases, Beijing can choose which prosecuting body will hear the case and which court it will be heard in, meaning that cases could potentially be held in the mainland. The anti-government protests last year were sparked over a proposed law that would allow extradition to mainland China.
  • Trials will be held in an open court but when the case involves "state secrets or public order" it can be moved behind closed doors.
This will affect foreigners, news organizations, international companies:
  • The law targets perceived foreign interference in Hong Kong. Throughout the protests, the Chinese government blamed "foreign forces" for interfering in the city's affairs. The law states that anyone who "steals, spies, obtains with payment, or unlawfully provides state secrets or intelligence" to a foreign country, institution, organization or individual will be guilty of an offense under collusion with foreign powers.
  • The law also makes it an offense for people to call on a foreign country, institution, organization or individual to impose sanctions or blockades on Hong Kong. The US said it would impose visa restrictions on current and former Chinese officials over Hong Kong.
  • Working with a foreign government, institution, organization or individual to incite hatred against the Hong Kong or Chinese Central government is now a offense.
  • A new national security unit will be set up in the Hong Kong Police Force that will have the power to search properties, intercept information and perform covert surveillance without a warrant. It can also recruit members from outside of Hong Kong -- potentially allowing mainland officers to operate in the city.
  • The law also directs the Hong Kong government, along with the new commission, to strengthen its management over foreign news agencies and non-government organizations.
Other significant parts of the law:
  • The law requires that Hong Kong "shall promote national security education in schools and universities." The last time Hong Kong tried to introduce Chinese civic education into local schools in 2012, tens of thousands of people protested on the streets, arguing it constituted mainland propaganda.
  • Ultimately, the national security law trumps local laws: the new legislation states that if there is a conflict with existing Hong Kong law, the national security law will prevail.
24 Replies
r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?

Wonder how many of those over paid NBA stars will wear Hong Kong freedom matters on the back of their Jerseys. Better chance they will wear we support the communist chinese government.

BA Deere
Honored Advisor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?

Yeah, go over to "our friends the Chinese" country and tear down a statue of Chairman Mao and spray paint "BLM" all over everything and see what happens.

r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?

Going to be interesting during the debates.

WCMO
Senior Advisor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?

Examples of what happens in one-party government.

bruce MN
Advisor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?

It’d be a good time to have a competent Sec of State and a functioning State Department. 

sam1wiseone
Senior Contributor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?


@bruce MN wrote:

It’d be a good time to have a competent Sec of State and a functioning State Department. 


So we could be at war with Russia, turning stable nations like Libya into *****holes, droning American citizens around the globe,  shipping our jobs to slave labor nations?  You warmongers need to leave the country and take your heros HRC and John Bolton with you.

lemerik1958
Senior Contributor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?

And you guys are fine with the orange one being buddies buddies with someone who put bounties on our soldiers head.  Says a lot about your character 

BA Deere
Honored Advisor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?

Lemerik, you don`t have to put a "bounty" on the prey that a wolf hunts instinctively.

rsbs
Veteran Advisor

Re: Should we be selling beans to these guys?

lemmingrick and the rest just jump on whatever talking point their handlers give them. One fake news event after another, trying to gin up support to vote Trump out. Gets a little tiresome.