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BA Deere
Honored Advisor

Sure, but who`s gonna milk one?

That could go under "jobs Americans won`t do"   🙂

 

http://naturalsociety.com/newest-weapon-against-superbugs-tasmanian-devil-milk-6453/  

 

 

image.pnghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3qEYHj3K9To/TZ52dUrUFbI/AAAAAAAAAuE/AgvprOiHEk0/s1600/taz.jpg

3 Replies
NewAgJudge
Senior Contributor

Re: Sure, but who`s gonna milk one?

 

 

Has anyone tested his link for Russian data grabs, bots or general syphilis ??

 

I went to one of their links posted here the other day, and got an instant EMERGENCY ALERT from Kaspersky

jennys_mn
Veteran Advisor

Re: Sure, but who`s gonna milk one?

Yeah, it's why I won't open links from on here.  I will research the link and try to find my own source of it on the internet.  But I won't open links from several of the posters on here.

 

That was never a problem on the Marketing Page.  But here, emotions are running too high, there is so much spite and anger that I trust nothing that is posted here without checking it out first.

 

Jen

AllenJwi
Senior Contributor

Re: Sure, but who`s gonna milk one?

Works just fine....

cientists are working on finding solutions to the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant superbugs. The latest weapon in their arsenal is Tasmanian devil milk.

The Tasmanian devil is a marsupial, which means it’s a mammal that is born very early in its development and spends a few months growing and suckling inside their mothers’ pouches, just like kangaroos and opossums. [1]

Researchers in Australia have suspected for some time that marsupials might carry some potent chemicals in their bodies to help their young grow. It was Tasmanian devils’ pouches that led researchers to study these chemicals.

 

The furry brown critters are born 3 weeks into their mothers’ pregnancy. These imps, as baby Tasmanian devils are called, must crawl up through their mother’s fur to this pouch, where they will suckle and continue to grow for about 4 months.

Research shows that these pouches contain tons of bacteria, including pathogens that could harm the underdeveloped young. Scientists thought there must be immune system-boosting qualities in the mother’s milk to help the imps develop in such an environment.