cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
hardnox
Advisor

The coal miners

Looks like they'll take the place of former GOP poster icons like the butchered third trimester fetus and the two grooms on the wedding cake.

 

I see where Con Blankenship was in the crowd for Hillary's foray into coal country- he doesn't have to report to prison until next week.

 

 

Appalachian coal had its heyday roughly WWII through the seventies when unions were strong. Since then the number and quality of jobs have declined precipitously even as tonnages (alot of that is western thermal coal) have risen.

 

Mountaintop and strip mining take a lot less labor and of course since the '70s the coal companies have screwed miners every way they could think of- breaking unions, ransacking pensions, systematically denying black lung and other work injury compensation.

 

A typical tactic is to strip the company out financially in Romneyesque fashion and then declare bankruptcy in order to break the union contract, strip ot pensions and lower wage costs.

 

BTW, this is very domestic industry- exports far exceed imports so hard to blame trade pressures.

 

11 Replies
r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: The coal miners

All of that coal that goes over seas doesn't cause man made global warming, it's just the coal burned in this country where it is burned using clean coal technology. Or maybe just for once she she wasn't lieing when she said she wants to put the coal miners out of business. I'm sure you would vote for her if she said she was going to put you out of business.

hardnox
Advisor

Re: The coal miners

I'm sure it would be popular to issue an edict that the Chinese will have to buy Australian coal because we won't sell them any. And, of course, pointless anyway.

 

Mountain top removal has to be about the craziest thing I've ever heard of.

 

I'm reminded of a line in All the Kings Men, one of my favorite novels (ought to be experiencing a revival as the setting is a fictionalized facsimile of Huey Long's Louisiana).

 

Jack Burden, former reporter and political fixer for The Boss, and the narrator, says about the gullies running down the red clay hillsides of the clear cut timber in the northern part of the state, "where yankee greed and rebel stupidity joined forces."

 

 

hardnox
Advisor

Re: The coal miners

Another recommended read, Grisham's Gray Mountain.

 

About coal country, more polemical than his typical stemwinder but he always tells a good story.

r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: The coal miners

Hillary never said she was going to shut down strip mining. She said she was going to shut down the coal industry because of man made global warming. The miners lives are not important to her. Only the funding from the environmental groups

hardnox
Advisor

Re: The coal miners

For other eyes as I'd be wasting my time with you.

 

http://www.nma.org/pdf/c_employment_state_region_method.pdf

 

About 75,000 jobs nationally, and those have generally degenerated sharply in quality with de-unionization and financial machinations.

 

hardnox
Advisor

continued

coal mining employment was something like half a million in the heyday and near 200K as recently as the early 80s but has declined steadily.

 

Overlay that with the annual tonnage which increased steadily throughout until pretty recently.

 

Seems, actually, to be an excellent example of the impact of technology (and in this case deregulation) and the relative quality of those remaining jobs declined even as output per worker rose continuously.

r3020
Senior Advisor

Re: The coal miners

Did you ever consider the people employed who make coal mining equipment, transport it, make the equipment that burns it. Their jobs unimportant also? They just a bunch of women hating bigots who refuse to vote for Hillary when she promises to put them out of business?

hardnox
Advisor

Re: The coal miners

Let's suppose that total coal mined declines 5% a year for 20 years (hopefully beginning with MTR), which seems improbably steep. Germany has moved faster to renewables than any other major economy and they still burn a lot of lignite, and the price of natural gas is probably going to go back closer to the actual cost of production at some point in the not too distant future.

 

The world won't come to an end for "those people" at any faster rate than it has been for 30 years.

 

And my guess is that will continue approximately apace even if they're successfully used as hostages against the collectivist global warming hoax movement. They'll just be left with fewer mountains and more poisoned streams. Undoubtedly a few more mass disasters from floods and landslides caused by the indiscriminate dumping of the overburden.

hardnox
Advisor

MTR

http://appvoices.org/end-mountaintop-removal/community/

 

However, the federal government’s regulation of surface mining in Appalachia has met constant pushback from coal industry advocates. Following the EPA’s 2011 veto of the permit for Spruce Mine No. 1 mountaintop mine in Logan County, W.Va., which would be the largest mine in the state, legislation was introduced in both the 111th and 112th Congresses to strip the EPA’s authority to veto mine permits under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act.

The entanglement of coal with Washington politics in the form of power plays and campaign contributions reduces the incentive for politicians to support economic diversification in Appalachia. Today, the mine-ravaged land – with barren terrain and polluted water – fails to attract outside investment besides coal.

- See more at: http://appvoices.org/end-mountaintop-removal/community/#sthash.WgFe08OO.dpuf

 

However, the federal government’s regulation of surface mining in Appalachia has met constant pushback from coal industry advocates. Following the EPA’s 2011 veto of the permit for Spruce Mine No. 1 mountaintop mine in Logan County, W.Va., which would be the largest mine in the state, legislation was introduced in both the 111th and 112th Congresses to strip the EPA’s authority to veto mine permits under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act.

The entanglement of coal with Washington politics in the form of power plays and campaign contributions reduces the incentive for politicians to support economic diversification in Appalachia. Today, the mine-ravaged land – with barren terrain and polluted water – fails to attract outside investment besides coal.

- See more at: http://appvoices.org/end-mountaintop-removal/community/#sthash.WgFe08OO.dpuf

 

However, the federal government’s regulation of surface mining in Appalachia has met constant pushback from coal industry advocates. Following the EPA’s 2011 veto of the permit for Spruce Mine No. 1 mountaintop mine in Logan County, W.Va., which would be the largest mine in the state, legislation was introduced in both the 111th and 112th Congresses to strip the EPA’s authority to veto mine permits under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act.

The entanglement of coal with Washington politics in the form of power plays and campaign contributions reduces the incentive for politicians to support economic diversification in Appalachia. Today, the mine-ravaged land – with barren terrain and polluted water – fails to attract outside investment besides coal.

- See more at: http://appvoices.org/end-mountaintop-removal/community/#sthash.WgFe08OO.dpuf