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Advisor

Trump* campaign spent $650M in '16 officially

maybe a $B more in soft PAC cash, free media from CNN etc.

Promised to put in $100M of his own money, actually recorded $65m but with all the laundering back to his companies it is no doubt a lot less, maybe negative if you take the last 3 years.

Mike Bloomberg has a NW of $54B according to Forbes, and as owner of 88% of his company probably makes a $B a year. He's 77 years old and has more money than 6 generations could, or should spend. If he wants to he can drop $5B and not blink. Only reason no to is if he's worried about where he'd be on next years list (an existential dread for most oligarchs) but I don't think it bothers him.

Trump* impersonated John Barron to questionably get on the list- he might be worth a $B. He doesn't know a lot but he knows that the real guys can crush him. And as Bloomberg saturates the airwaves with very effective ads it is getting in his head- as it should.

Not how I would have had it be but I'll take it.

Citizens United, ya know.

 

3 Replies
Advisor

Re: Trump* campaign spent $650B in '16 officially

*for Trump since the use of the pseudonym he used in felonious hush money payoffs to hookers is now considered "spam"

At least for "Republicans"?

Advisor

Re: Trump* campaign spent $650B in '16 officially

When our POTUS clearly and unassailably  made felonious hush money payments to hookers, how can that be considered a topic that can't be referenced?

Senior Contributor

Re: Trump* campaign spent $650M in '16 officially

According to this he is making some of or maybe all of it back, looks like it was an investment to rejuvenate a failing resort and gold course or two.

https://www.yahoo.com/huffpost/trump-doral-room-rates-110000219.html

Donald Trump’s plan to address the Republican National Committee’s winter meeting at Trump National Doral next to the Miami airport has been in the works since mid-January, about the same time that the resort raised the nightly rate for its least expensive rooms from $254 to $539.

That higher figure is just under the maximum per-night rate federal government rules permit for a hotel in South Florida, and is triple the normal “per diem” rate employees are supposed to follow.