cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
idalivered
Advisor

Re: Since you asked

. Many of the germans and hollanders around here would consider it a complement to be called "cheap ass".

cotman03
Senior Contributor

Re: Since you asked

Welfare is a much bigger problem than you realize.  There was an editorial in the Wall Street Journal not long ago that said that in order to hire a single mother with 2 kids from the welfare roles, an employer would have to pay her at least $63,000.  That's what she would be giving up to get a job.  Do you think any employer out there is going to pay an entry level person with no job skills or work ethic, she's probably never had a job, that kind of money?  You wouldn't have done it when you were an employer.  No way I'd do it.  I wouldn't even consider half that for someone with no skills.  There has to be a way with the welfare system to wean people off of it.  Right now it's kind of an all or none proposition in the welfare system.  Get a job and start making money and you lose the welfare benefits, not food stamps but the checks.  Marry someone with any income at all, same thing. 

man of steel
Senior Contributor

Re: Since you asked

Yup! Same goes for unemployment compensation.

 

 

 

 

buckfarmer
Senior Contributor

Re: What do you think is the best strategy

Same applies to people nearing retirement. Friend of mine would like to retire and only work part time. Says if he works anything under 24 hours a week he would be better off taking his social security and company retirement. That's without dipping into his private retirement accounts. Also my mom is a school teacher. She is retired and went back to work for the school teaching as if she were a first year teacher. After truly seing both sides of that issue I'm really not sure what to think. It's good for her, the school, and the students. Not so good for someone that needs a job as a teacher.
cotman03
Senior Contributor

Re: Since you asked

For unemployment compensation that keeps getting extended it sure does.  On the welfare mother, if I offered her a job paying $70,000 a year, which I wouldn't do, would she give up $63,000 worth of freebies and just sitting at home to work all day?  I seriously doubt it.  It would take close to 6 figures probably to get her to even consider it.

kraft-t
Senior Advisor

Re: Since you asked

Yavoll!

kraft-t
Senior Advisor

Re: Since you asked

238 thusand new hires last month. Where did these people come from that will abandon that life of luxury on the government dole and take that low paying job in the business world?

 

Is that a public school education that provided the intellect that declares that unemployed workers would magically find jobs if only their benefits were reduced. If only government wasn't so generous, I could afford one of those workers. LOL!

Milligan Hay - Iowa d:^)
Veteran Advisor

Re: Don, You are German, Aren't You?


@kraft-t wrote:

Yavoll!


It is spelled, JaWohl, which is YES with an emphatic, "it is willed", added to it.

kraft-t
Senior Advisor

Re: Don, You are German, Aren't You?

No it can't be Krafft is not a german name. I didn't spell it in german. Spelled it in english. lol!

Milligan Hay - Iowa d:^)
Veteran Advisor

Re: Don, You are German, Aren't You?


@kraft-t wrote:

No it can't be Krafft is not a german name. I didn't spell it in german. Spelled it in english. lol!


Wenn Sie es sagen.
 
Kraft Name Meaning
German (also Kräft), Danish, Swedish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a strong man, from Old High German kraft, German Kraft ‘strength’, ‘power’. The Swedish name probably originated as a soldier’s name. In part the German and Danish names possibly also derive from a late survival of the same word used as a byname, Old High German Chraft(o), Old Norse Kraptr