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Senior Contributor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

"Honest people show they care by their own actions, actions that personally cost them something. Asking the government to enforce your notions of caring is authoritarian arrogance."

 

I disagree with your interpretertation of this as a simple "notion" and assertion of "authoritarian arrogance," Sam.

 

How then do we turn this whole thing over to the private sector for regulation with no requirements, liabilities, caps or coverage mandates set by the government? How would it be that what I suggested would cost me nothing? I pay for health care and I pay taxes.

 

Do you really believe that nothing has to be done? Do you think the insurance companies and the medical industry are going to decide for our good that they should get together, give better coverage, lower medical costs, lower perscription costs, all without any urging from anyone but the American public? Where is the evidence of any will to do that on anyone's part and is it not a litte arrogant to believe coverage for those who need it in America will get better if the government just steps aside and lets them do their thing?

 

I don't like anyone's solution thus far. This is why I believe Congress needs to act. They should involve the industry and the people in their process.

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Senior Advisor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

Congress did act, that is how we got to where we are. Which will work fine until we run out of the rich's money then will look to the IMF.

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Advisor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

If you don't allow people to not participate it is by definition authoritarian. Most people including yourself want absolute top flight care and they want someone else to pay for it. The only group that could possibly subsidize the high cost consumers of medical care are also the poorest demographic, the young. It just so happens that the wealthiest demographic, older people, are also the high cost consumers. Means test medicare, base it on wealth. You people want to confiscate on death anyhow. Better yet ban all health Collectivism and watch the cost fall to what people can afford to pay
Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

"I don't like anyone's solution thus far. This is why I believe Congress needs to act. They should involve the industry and the people in their process."

 

 

I'm with you on that Knapper.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

"Most people including yourself want absolute top flight care and they want someone else to pay for it."

 

How do you figure that? Is not health insurance all about someone else paying? The healthy pay their premiums and the sick use it.

 

What I want...and I notice I always ask questions and give people a chance to respond rather than telling YOU what YOU think...is for insurance to be sold over state lines, insurance pools and groups to be formed.

 

And since you and R3020 insist on reading nothing I wite and telling me what I think or adding new meanings to what I wrote...please note that I said that "I don't like anyone's solution thus far."

 

I also noted that no ideas were put forth by either of you.

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Senior Advisor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

I never told you what you think or want. I just stated fact. The solution will never be found in government control, it can only be found in a free market system.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

3020, Actually that is an opinion, not even close to a fact. You are always free to say what you think or want out of a healthcare system or any other subject. You will have to do away with Medicare and Medicaid to get government control out of the picture. Are you willing to do away with that? Any ideas what, if anything would replace it? In both systems, the government tells insurers and doctors what the government will pay and that is certainly not a free market. The free market would be more like charge the highest price possible for reasonable service until a point where profits begin to diminish because fewer people are utilizing the service/goods. Those unable or unwilling to pay for the service can decline the use of the services or look for someone who will charge what is considered a reasonable price. How would this work with say dialysis? Ever tried to price shop for medical services?

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Advisor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

There are health insurers out there, what are you complaining about? And I gave you two different ideas.
Advisor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

Wow, you(ve got it. And yes I have price shopped you'd be amazed the discounts you can get for paying cash.
Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: Why the exemptions to those who supported the law?

Who doesn't price shop for medical services?  I price shop for eye exams, dental work, chiropractics, etc.  A neighbor of mine down the road was telling me about price quotes they received from hospitals before his son was born.  There was a 4000 dollar difference between the lowest and highest of the three hospitals they had quote.  He said this savings nearly paid his health insurance premium for the year.  While I understand there's a reluctance to shop around because of familiarity with a particular doctor, one has to also realize and agree to the additional cost associated with it.  I compare it to buying seedcorn.  A lot of seed companies give big discounts for new customers.  I've seen this with medical services as well.  Maybe I look at things differently, but I feel like the costs associated with a doctor's malpractice insurance has more than likely weeded most of the bad doctors out there.        

 

What I have found over the years is that medical services are a lot like other things when insurance is involved such as vehicle collision repair.  There are two sets of prices.  There's the cash price, and then there's the insurance price.  Most medical services get cheaper when cash is involved. 

 

The thing that irritates me the most with regards to this healthcare overhaul is putting everyone basically in a box and charging the same rate.  The only thing that makes rates different are age bracket, location, and tobacco use.  Auto insurance doesn't base premium this way.  Yes, they do take into account the age bracket and location.  However, they also base it from speeding violations; accidents; etc.  Why should someone in good health who's taken care of themselves be charged the same premium as someone who's done all sorts of damage to their health?