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Senior Advisor

Re: Re:Google it.....


@GreaTOne_65 wrote:

That Kool-aid is really tasty stuff, isn't it, Cougar! Maybe even addictive.

 

http://www.alternet.org/story/154082/conservatism_thrives_on_low_intelligence_and_poor_information?a...


Is this the same place you got your info on the function of the Supreme court?

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Senior Contributor

You have zucchini already?

  We haven't planted any zucchini yet as they do better here for us in the mild heat(early summer, then late summer), and we pick them when they're bigger than the hot-dog sizes that you see in the grocery stores. I cut them length-wise into a half inch thickness and brush on olive oil and garlic, and then grill them. I stagger the planting so when the vines get about 6-7 feet long I pull them out because they seem to produce fruit slower after that length.

  That's the first time that I've heard of eating the flowers though. Do they have a bitter taste even in that recipe?

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Advisor

Re: Zucchini flowers stuffed with eggplant mousse in a balsamic reduction

bYes I've also been enjoying the music on u-tube amazing classical recordings like Wanda Landowska playing the harpsichord, when harpsichord music was rare, and, Schweitzer on organ like I listened to at the library 40 years ago. There are now some recordings on the lautenwerk a instrument that was lost for years.

 

And all the good rock music and musicians, my favorate was Les Paul jaming with Jeff Beck at age 92.

 

  But I put up another recipe that has some real meat in it and get no bites.

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Advisor

Re: You have zucchini already?

  Some times people pull out the stamens to avoid bitterness, I haven't cooked them myself, but ate quite a few. they have a lite flavor.   My father would dip them in egg batter and then flour and cook in oil and sometimes in the oven.  I think steaming them would be better.

 

  They are a popular passover dish in the middle east and Mediterranean and sold in markets, but they must be cook right away so they are rather expensive.

 

  Usually they produce so much you can't give away the surplus fast enough, eating the flowers cuts down on the over production

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Senior Contributor

Re: Zucchini flowers stuffed with eggplant mousse in a balsamic reduction

Why call your wife a nincompoop to the world? You will have to pay for that some day.

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Senior Advisor

Re: You have zucchini already?


@tomtoolbag wrote:

  We haven't planted any zucchini yet as they do better here for us in the mild heat(early summer, then late summer), and we pick them when they're bigger than the hot-dog sizes that you see in the grocery stores. I cut them length-wise into a half inch thickness and brush on olive oil and garlic, and then grill them. I stagger the planting so when the vines get about 6-7 feet long I pull them out because they seem to produce fruit slower after that length.

  That's the first time that I've heard of eating the flowers though. Do they have a bitter taste even in that recipe?


Where do you get zucchinis that vine?

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Senior Contributor

Re: Re:Google it.....

No, I didn't. This Court has proven with the Citizens United fiasco, they are willing to make their own laws to support their own political views, which is clearly against the constitution.

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Senior Contributor

Re: You have zucchini already?

  I did a search for recipes for the flowers and there were quite a few. I'll have to try it this year instead of pinching them off or dealing with the abundance all at once, just as you said. A lot of times I freeze them for stews that I make over the winter but usually use the fall batch for that.

 

  Thanks for the new idea though.

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Senior Contributor

Re: You have zucchini already?

  They get longer with time, and I have an old neighbor that just let them grow all summer long until they no longer produce fruit, and the stems/vines on his get about 12-14 feet long. I think that he plants his seeds in groups of 3 in a mound, in a narrow area about 2-3 feet wide, alternating one mound on the left, then one mound on the right. 

  I plant them so they grow through a plastic snow type of fence that's suspended to keep the fruit off of the ground because we water with rain water from barrels and a water blivet, so they don't rot. I've noticed that the shorter the vine and the younger the plant, you can let the fruit get bigger and the seed core in the middle isn't as big compared to letting the plant get bigger and there's more "meat" instead of a bigger core of seeds.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: What does this have to do with zucchini ? ?

FWIW, zuccini around here, is like farm cats.  Either none to be found, or way more than you ever need. 
I even took to locking my car doors when I go to town in the summer.  Not that I worry about theft, but I fear somone dumping in some extra zucchini.