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Contributor

chickens

I am very new to raising chickens and have 6 different breeds and two guinea's.

 

Question 1:  I have a black and white crested rooster who I keep separated from my Rhode Island reds, black australops, leghorns, silkie and golden sebright, do I need to worry about my rooster being able to cross breed with any of my hens other then the black and white polish hen that I do want him to breed with eventually?

 

Question 2: I cracked open three fresh eggs to cook and found that each of the three eggs had a small round spot in them, what would cause this and were the eggs bad? I didn't eat them. Are my layers sick?

 

Question 3: I believe that one of my hens, which is laying eggs, may have worms. The deworming medication I bought said that I should not treat them if laying eggs for consumption so how do I treat them?

7 Replies
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Senior Advisor

Re: chickens


@tndrhrt wrote:

I am very new to raising chickens and have 6 different breeds and two guinea's.

 

Question 1:  I have a black and white crested rooster who I keep separated from my Rhode Island reds, black australops, leghorns, silkie and golden sebright, do I need to worry about my rooster being able to cross breed with any of my hens other then the black and white polish hen that I do want him to breed with eventually?

 

Are you going to incubate the eggs or let the hen raise them? Even a thunder storm can ruined the eggs. Let the rooster run, won't hurt anything.

 

Question 2: I cracked open three fresh eggs to cook and found that each of the three eggs had a small round spot in them, what would cause this and were the eggs bad? I didn't eat them. Are my layers sick?

 

No idea. May they are fertile?

 

Question 3: I believe that one of my hens, which is laying eggs, may have worms. The deworming medication I bought said that I should not treat them if laying eggs for consumption so how do I treat them?

 

You will have to discard the eggs for a few days to a few weeks. Should tell on the container when it is safe to eat the eggs again.


 

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Contributor

Re: chickens

Thank you for your reponse.  I don't want any cross breeding in my flock so I wasn't sure.  But if he is not able to breed with any of my other hens then yeah I will let him run....He will be so happy.

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: chickens

Oh, he'll breed with them. But if you eat the eggs you'll never know it.

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Contributor

Re: chickens

Thank you. I really just don't want him to cross breed with my other hens, that is except his own kind.  I currently keep him in a fairly large penned area to prevent him from chasing my hens around.  He was getting pretty rough with my hens so I know keep him in the pen.  My hens seem happier.

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Contributor

Re: chickens

I bought wazine and the bottle says do not give to your layers if their eggs are used for human consumption that is all.

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Senior Advisor

Re: chickens

Looks like it's 2 weeks.

 

snip-

If I worm with Wazine, does that mean I'll never be able to eat my eggs again???
Also, it says the withdrawl time on birds meant for consumption is 2 weeks, is this accurate? 
Please share you experiences with me!!

 

 

 

The "don't use on birds intended for consumption" means immediate consumption.  The "withdrawal" time (the time that you eat neither the birds nor their eggs) is officially 14 days.

Wazine must be repeated and only kills adult worms, not larvae.  You will want to retreat in 2-4 weeks with a wormer that does kill larvae.  Otherwise you have to keep using wazine over and over to kill the larvae that become adults. 

Ivermectin and fenbendazole are the easiest to get and are effective and, though labeled for horses/cattle/swine, are great for poultry.

Ivermectin:  pour-on, injectable (used orally), or horse-paste.  Ask for dosage.  10 day withdrawal.
Fenbendazole (Safe-Guard):  horse paste.  bb-sized piece in the beak of each bird; 14 day withdrawal.

Do please worm first with Wazine.  THen follow up with the more broad spectrum wormers and do them at least twice annually thereafter.  Aim for when birds aren't laying so you don't have to toss their eggs.  You CAN feed their eggs back to them during withdrawal.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=2626947

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Senior Contributor

Re: chickens

1.  Get rid of that black and white crested rooster.  Those mongrels will breed to anything if let and have seen them punch eggs out of an empty tin.   They are one sick chook.  Be careful if you cross him with that polish chick as they are not good at crossing the language barrier.  You also have to feed them European chook food which could be hard to find in the states.  Put him an a stew with lots of chilli, potatoes and a small rock.  When the rock goes soft, throw away the rest and eat the rock.

 

2.  What colour was the spots?  If they are slightly red, nothing to worry about.  If they are red crested with tattoos, they are fertilized by that black and white punk rooster you have.  You can eat them but you might eventually begin to sing grunch songs like they do in Britain. Get rid of him - he is not worth it.

 

3. How can you tell if they have worms?  A  little inspection in the appropriate area maybe?  Don't eat the eggs if it says not too, is that clear?  

 

All the best,    Colonel Sanders.