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Senior Contributor

free stuff

I believe Oct is the month the generous taxpayers hand out fruits of their labor in form of Direct Payts for our govt employed subsizied farmers.     Good way to pay health ins premiums

16 Replies
Senior Contributor

Re: free stuff

That should make the dogs bark.
Senior Advisor

Re: free stuff

All on the backs of the working people,

 

snip-

Americans who were recipients of means-tested government benefits in 2011 outnumbered year-round full-time workers, according to data released this month by the Census Bureau.

They also out-numbered the total population of the Philippines.

There were 108,592,000 people in the United States in the fourth quarter of 2011 who were recipients of one or more means-tested government benefit programs, the Census Bureau said in data released this week. Meanwhile, according to the Census Bureau, there were 101,716,000 people who worked full-time year round in 2011. That included both private-sector and government workers.

That means there were about 1.07 people getting some form of means-tested government benefit for every 1 person working full-time year round.

The Census Bureau counted as recipients of means-tested government programs “anyone residing in a household in which one or more people received benefits from the program.” Many of these people lived in households receiving more than one form of means-tested benefit at the same time.

Among the 108,592,000 people who fit the Census Bureau’s description of a means-tested benefit recipient in the fourth quarter of 2011 were 82,457,000 people in households receiving Medicaid, 49,073,000 beneficiaries of food stamps, 20,223,000 on Supplemental Security Income, 23,228,000 in the Women, Infants and Children program, 13,433,000 in public or subsidized rental housing, and 5,854,000 in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. Also among the 108,592,000 means-tested benefit recipients counted by the Census Bureau were people getting free or reduced-price lunch or breakfast, state-administered supplemental security income and means-tested veterans pensions.

The 108,592,000 people who were recipients of means-tested government programs in the fourth quarter of 2011 does not include people who received benefits from non-means-tested government programs but not from means-tested ones. That would include, for example, people who received Social Security, Medicare, unemployment, or non-means-tested veterans compensation, but did not receive benefits from a means-tested program such as food stamps or public housing.

In the fourth quarter of 2011, according to the Census Bureau, there were 49,901,000 people who received Social Security benefits, 46,440,000 who received Medicare benefits, 5,098,000 on unemployment, and 3,178,000 who received non-means-tested veterans compensation.

When the people who received non-means-tested government benefits from programs such as Social Security, Medicare, unemployment and non-means-tested veterans compensation are added to those who received means-tested government programs such as food stamps, Supplemental Security Income and public housing, the total number of people receiving government benefits from one or more programs in the United States in 2011 climbs to 151,014,000, according to the Census Bureau.

- See more at: http://cnsnews.com/news/article/terence-p-jeffrey/census-bureau-means-tested-govt-benefit-recipients...

Senior Contributor

Re: free stuff

And besides the free $$ they get illegal trade restrictions to help keep their prices up and distort the 'free market'

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/canadian-beef-prices-could-fall-as-tyson-stops-buying-1.2252149

One of the world's largest producers of meat says it will stop buying Canadian cattle because of the high cost of having to follow U.S. meat labelling rules.

The decision from Tyson Foods Inc. is expected to lead to a drop in prices for Canadian producers.

Martin Unrau, president of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association, says the decision is a huge blow to the industry.       

“The cattle we raise here are the exact same type of cattle that they raise in the U.S. under the same conditions. We are using the same products. So absolutely it's a trade barrier,” Unrau told CBC News.

 

 

Senior Contributor

Re: free stuff

But old 3020 won't have a bar of the truth.

The irony is he has forgot to mention that part of those numbers include vets, old age pensions, invalid and many others.

Tell us the number who are receiving unemployment benefits. While you are there could we now include all the farmers as bludgers as you are about to say about the unemployment?
Senior Advisor

Re: free stuff


@gough whitlam wrote:
But old 3020 won't have a bar of the truth.

The irony is he has forgot to mention that part of those numbers include vets, old age pensions, invalid and many others.

Tell us the number who are receiving unemployment benefits. While you are there could we now include all the farmers as bludgers as you are about to say about the unemployment?

The story mentions every person if you are capable of reading and comprehending it.

Senior Advisor

Re: free stuff


@Canuck_2 wrote:

And besides the free $$ they get illegal trade restrictions to help keep their prices up and distort the 'free market'

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/canadian-beef-prices-could-fall-as-tyson-stops-buying-1.2252149

One of the world's largest producers of meat says it will stop buying Canadian cattle because of the high cost of having to follow U.S. meat labelling rules.

The decision from Tyson Foods Inc. is expected to lead to a drop in prices for Canadian producers.

Martin Unrau, president of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association, says the decision is a huge blow to the industry.       

“The cattle we raise here are the exact same type of cattle that they raise in the U.S. under the same conditions. We are using the same products. So absolutely it's a trade barrier,” Unrau told CBC News.

 

 


Your "beef" is with Almighty Big Government and it's never ending regulations. All the consumers want is a quality product at an affordable price. But Almighty Big Government, in it's infinite wisdom, decide to create 100s of high paying tax payer funded jobs to force meat packers to put on worthless labels that has nothing to do with quality or affordability. All it does is give government more power and control.

Senior Contributor

Re: free stuff

Why you'd think the canucks would be so proud of their product that they'd want it labeled:

 

Product of Canada

Senior Contributor

want to understand this post

check out what Krauthammer had to say to Jon Stewart on Stewart's Oct 23rd program.

Very simple, very clear explanation of why this report is so revealing and I think important.

Senior Contributor

Re: free stuff


@r3020 wrote: 

Your "beef" is with Almighty Big Government and it's never ending regulations. All the consumers want is a quality product at an affordable price. But Almighty Big Government, in it's infinite wisdom, decide to create 100s of high paying tax payer funded jobs to force meat packers to put on worthless labels that has nothing to do with quality or affordability. All it does is give government more power and control.


No the problem is with the agriculture groups in the US that want COOL to be a tarrif to give them an unfair advantage in the market.

Obviously they know they are not as efficient a producer as others so they have to hide behind a trade barrier.

 

It is good that you can see the hypocracy of people who might want less government and then support more unnecessary rules that add more costs.

 

And can you list all the ag groups in your country that supoort COOL?

And what about those that oppose it?