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Advisor

happy end of year

To me the few weeks around the end of november, first of december have always felt like the end of the year. The first real bite of winter usually shows up, the chores for the year are winding down, the freezer, the cupboards, and woodshed are full and deer season comes and goes. For most, a year goes and comes in a few minutes on december 31st but I think for those that live and work with nature it more fades away then fades in again. At least it always felt that way to me.
8 Replies
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Senior Advisor

Re: happy end of year

Time goes pretty fast now with one holiday hardly over before the next begins. First thing you know we are into January and you think things will slow down a bit. They may if the snow is deep but the sun comes up early every morning. You think well I still have a lot of time, but first thing you know spring is close, we turn the clock ahead, and the planter still has that wobbly closing wheel and the same old bearings in the seed disk. Still haven't put the new tire on the disk or changed the shovels on the field cultivator. You can't remember which row the monitor was acting up on last season and it's time to get the wheat top dressed. It gets a little harder to sleep at night, especially when you see the neighbor putting on NH3 and you know your still a couple of days from ready. I just hope the tiles start to run and the rivers come up a little before go time gets here. It'll work out in the end, it always does, just be a few more gray hairs staring back when you look in the mirror.

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Senior Contributor

Re: happy end of year

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Veteran Advisor

Re: happy end of year

You could always get some cows.  That way, when it is below zero, you will have ice to chop, a balky tractor to try to start on the coldest day, critters to feed, doctor, and chase back in the fences.  To me, the 'relief' comes, after the calves are sold.  The cows aren't so bad, but the calves tend to be the ones that get out, get sick, etc.

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Senior Advisor

Re: happy end of year


@Nebrfarmr wrote:

You could always get some cows.  That way, when it is below zero, you will have ice to chop, a balky tractor to try to start on the coldest day, critters to feed, doctor, and chase back in the fences.  To me, the 'relief' comes, after the calves are sold.  The cows aren't so bad, but the calves tend to be the ones that get out, get sick, etc.


Have cattle. That stuff never even entered my mind it has become so routine. The old 3020 gas will start even on the coldest of mornings. The auger on the bin will be the problem.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: happy end of year

I run an old IH 656 Farmall gas burner.  It too, will start on the coldest days.   I have more of a problem getting myself started, when it is below zero, than I do it, LOL.

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Senior Contributor

Re: happy end of year

My thermometer got as high as 81 Saturday.  It doesn't feel like winter to me.  My cows all run on stalks, so I don't have that luxury of firing up a tractor to feed them.  Most all of the tanks run off electricity for pumping water, so I just put tank heaters in the tanks.  Up in Montana, they bury culvert into the ground and run them up through their tanks so they don't have ice.  I've always wanted to try it, but I really haven't ever found a way to get the culvert buried ten feet deep.  Calving season is when things really get heated up around here.  It's not the cows that seem to take much work.  It's the dang first calf heifers.  The relief comes when the cows and calves go off to grass most years.  This past year, it still took a lot of work because it was so danged hot.  I had to check the windmills every two to three days.  A lot of guys around here have sold their cows and just run yearlings.  I can't say that I haven't from time to time been tempted to do the same.    

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Veteran Advisor

Re: happy end of year

Locally, we have people using old earthmover tires for tanks. They cover half with a double or triple layer of plywood, and I guess the rubber insulates well enough they stay open down to zero degrees, without heat. My tank is at the end of a pipeline, no power there. I need to check the cows anyway, so when I see them heading to where the tank is (I can se it from the house if the weather is clear) I walk out and chop it. Calving has gone much better since we went to later calving, and we bred in calving ease for a while now, to the point I can say I went 3 years pulling only one calf. Last year, a neighbors bull got in with our heifers, so I had to pull those two, but the rest did ok on their own.
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Advisor

Re: happy end of year

Closing in fast on winter.  Played (final?) rd. of golf a week ago tommorow.  76 and sunny.

 

Neighbor called just a bit ago to let  me know that he was ice fishing.