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Veteran Advisor

Re: refigious question

Actually, there have been instances where people who were terminally ill, who were put on scales, and at the time of death, suddenly 'lost' a little over 20 grams, even the Dr. doing the test couldn't explain what it was, other than perhaps the soul leaving the body.

 

From the article:  http://perdurabo10.tripod.com/id787.html

 

Dr. Duncan MacDougall ofHaverhillconducted his experiment with the help of six dying patients placed in a specially designed bed. The bed was built on a scale so that they could be weighed before, during and immediately after death.

 

Writing in a journal of American Medicine, Dr. MacDougall told of one patient who was dying of tuberculosis. He wrote: "He lost weight slowly at the rate of one ounce per hour due to evaporation of moisture in respiration and evaporation of sweat. At the end of the three hours and forty minutes, he expired and suddenly coincident with death the beam end (of the scale) dropped with an audible stroke . . . "

 

He said the loss was about three-fourths of an ounce, or just over 21 grams.

 

MacDougall conducted similar tests during the deaths of other patients over the years and got similar results. He noted that the entire bed was weighed so that any loss of fluids from urine or the bowels at the moment of death would still be weighed because the material would remain on the bed.

 

The doctor even considered loss of left-over air in the lungs. To test the possible weight of air in the lungs, he said he and another person each got on the bed and strenuously inhaled and exhaled. Their efforts made no change on the scale.

 

As a further part of his experiments, Dr. MacDougall wrote that he tried the same experiment with 15 dogs. He said he had to drug the animals to keep them from struggling, which suggests that he also used drugs to kill them. He wrote that there was no change in the weight of the bodies of the dogs at the moment of their death.

 

The experiments suggest then, that the soul has substance and a measurable mass. It also suggests that humans have something that animals do not, and that it leaves the body at the moment we die.

 

 Which is also confirmed by Snopes:

 

http://www.snopes.com/religion/soulweight.asp

 

 

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Senior Contributor

Re: refigious question

Absolute rubbish.  I will bet the doctor believed in god as well.  From that we can now establish the soul weighs approx 21 grams? How much did his sins weigh?

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Senior Contributor

Re: refigious question

Gee mate - I am surprised you will want to stick to that crap.  There is no connection between the "soul" and its passage through Jesus Christ to heaven.  There is no soul, there is no heaven and there is no Jesus Christ to make it happen.  As simplistic as that seems, the complication of such fables is what makes the indelible mark on the mind of mental weaklings. Hence, there recalcitrance to relinquish any beliefs.  Not to mention that some braindead father has been shoving it down the throat of the gullible children for so long -------- and the beat goes on.   Somewhere along the line the cycle must be broken and, heaven forbid, people have to start thinking.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: refigious question

You are free to post a link to any scientific study, done anywhere, that refutes it, and I promise to read it. 

Until then, to what do you explain the loss of that weight?

 

You said that there was research done, autopsies which found nothing that looked like a 'soul'.  I can believe that.  I know in my mind exactly what my mother looked like, but I don't think the best autopsy in the world can show what that memory looked like.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: refigious question

There are all sorts of historical records of Jesus that aren't in the Bible.  They refer to his walking the Earth, but most don't recognize him as savior.

 

There is evidence of a great exodus of 'slaves' from Egypt found in anceint hyroglyphics, that share a striking resemblance of the story of Moses.  They even depict a man with a staff leading them away.

 

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: refigious question

I wouldn't punish the jews for killing jesus, but I would exact revenge for the Isrealis attacking the US liberty. An attack not unlike the attack on the USS Cole.

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Senior Advisor

Re: thats my problem

It's not me that is overweight. It's my soul that is the lard butt.

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Senior Advisor

Re: thats my problem


@kraft-t wrote:

It's not me that is overweight. It's my soul that is the lard butt.


I wouldn't worry too much about it Mr. Kraft. I think in a few years it will get a bunch of that lard melted off. Smiley Very Happy

Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: refigious question


@Nebrfarmr wrote:

Actually, there have been instances where people who were terminally ill, who were put on scales, and at the time of death, suddenly 'lost' a little over 20 grams, even the Dr. doing the test couldn't explain what it was, other than perhaps the soul leaving the body.

 

From the article:  http://perdurabo10.tripod.com/id787.html

 

Dr. Duncan MacDougall ofHaverhillconducted his experiment with the help of six dying patients placed in a specially designed bed. The bed was built on a scale so that they could be weighed before, during and immediately after death.

 

Writing in a journal of American Medicine, Dr. MacDougall told of one patient who was dying of tuberculosis. He wrote: "He lost weight slowly at the rate of one ounce per hour due to evaporation of moisture in respiration and evaporation of sweat. At the end of the three hours and forty minutes, he expired and suddenly coincident with death the beam end (of the scale) dropped with an audible stroke . . . "

 

He said the loss was about three-fourths of an ounce, or just over 21 grams.

 

MacDougall conducted similar tests during the deaths of other patients over the years and got similar results. He noted that the entire bed was weighed so that any loss of fluids from urine or the bowels at the moment of death would still be weighed because the material would remain on the bed.

 

The doctor even considered loss of left-over air in the lungs. To test the possible weight of air in the lungs, he said he and another person each got on the bed and strenuously inhaled and exhaled. Their efforts made no change on the scale.

 

As a further part of his experiments, Dr. MacDougall wrote that he tried the same experiment with 15 dogs. He said he had to drug the animals to keep them from struggling, which suggests that he also used drugs to kill them. He wrote that there was no change in the weight of the bodies of the dogs at the moment of their death.

 

The experiments suggest then, that the soul has substance and a measurable mass. It also suggests that humans have something that animals do not, and that it leaves the body at the moment we die.

 

 Which is also confirmed by Snopes:

 

http://www.snopes.com/religion/soulweight.asp

 

 


NEB I hope you read that snopes article all the way through and I might add not what snopes is saying is true, that a Dr. placed dying people on a scale to measure the weight of the human soul.

It does not say that he actually measured any soul.

as noted at the end of the Snopes article MacDougall's results were flawed because of the methodolgy used, the sample size was too small and the ability to measure changes in weight imprecise.


Highlighted
Veteran Advisor

Re: refigious question

Yes, his sample size was small, but it had 100% repeatability.

 

The scale was accurate enough to measure an ounce per hour weight loss due to evaporation, but somehow a 'sudden' loss is inaccurate?


Feel free to link to any study that proves this wrong, I promise I'll read through it.

 

So, what can you suggest the sudden weight loss came from?