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Nebrfarmr
Veteran Advisor

MOO

Hearing that a lot today, as weaning time is here. We are some of the later people around to wean, but we calve later than most, so they really aren't any older than anyone elses. Besides, for the last several years, who wouldn't want to have some five to six weight calves in April? Anyway, so far so good. None sick, none out. Thought the cattle forum seemed slow and wondered about anyone with colorful weaning stories. My best one is when I was sick for three days, so put off weaning until after a predicted 'snow shower' weather event, and it turned out being a two day blizzard with 18 inches of snow, and 50 MPH wind gusts. No calves were lost, but I can only imagine the nightmare had that happened had we weaned when we planned, and had them off the cows 18 hours or so before it hit. Call it divine intervention, or bad chicken, but that was the year a stomach bug saved us a train wreck.
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3 Replies
rightone
Senior Contributor

Re: MOO, 2

Had plenty of winter here in the high country the past 40 days.

Been getting these short yearlings / long calves costing in the $130 cwt to $145 range weighing 500 to 600 ( steers and hiefers mixed ) sending em N to nicer weather.

 

Good young bred black and ra cows costing $1,000 been going N too.

 

 

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jrsiajdranch
Veteran Advisor

Re: MOO

Nebraska, Hows your hay holdin up?

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Nebrfarmr
Veteran Advisor

Re: MOO

So far, so good.  The only hay we have fed so far, would be to the weaned calves, and the bulls.  The cows have been on the cornstalks on their own, so far.  While we have had a few snows, it has always warmed up enough to melt off.  Looks like we'll be able to get full use of them this year.  We had enough hay to feed them every day from Jan1 to May 15th, and with this mild winter, it looks like we'll have plenty.  Probably will start feeding them every other day starting maybe Jan 20 or 25 or so, unless the weather makes us start sooner, and then every day after the first of Feb.  It will be good to have the extra hay, as things are dry dry dry as far as sub moisture goes.  The lots thaw the top inch or two every day, and except for the corner where they stand to moo at the cows, and right by the bunk, it is getting awfully dusty.  What moisture we did have, was in small amounts, and melted off.  Not good for dryland alfalfa.

Weather is funny this year.  The week after Thanksgiving, we had -17 F overnight, and last Thursday, it was 67 above.  "average" for this time of year is about 5-10 at night, and 25-35 during the day.  I say 'average', because in Nebraska, when it comes to weather, just about anything but a hurricane or tsunami is 'normal'  The 67 above didn't even set a record for heat, but the -17 was the record cold, for the day.

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