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Shaggy98
Senior Advisor

July 18 Milo Photos

Olmitz Milo 7-18-2013.jpg

 

Speck Milo 7-18-2013.jpg

 

UD Milo 7-18-2013.jpg

 

UD Milo 1 7-18-2013.jpg

The last two pictures were of crops planted June 8th.  The first two pictures were of crops planted on May 23.

 

Snyder Milo 7-18-2013.jpg

This picture shows a corner of a field of milo that has been eaten by chinch bugs.  Seed was treated but obviously didn't do the job.  I'm working with the seed company as well as the insecticide company.  Someone is going to pay but I'm not sure who yet.  It's too late for replant and I'm not interested in any free seed so it needs to be a cash payout.

 

 

 

The milo is hanging on surprisingly well, but it will need some rain to make a decent finish.

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3 Replies
idalivered
Advisor

Re: July 18 Milo Photos

shaggy, i know nothing about milo, except that it needs less water than corn.the nearest milo is probably several hundred miles west of me somewhere in nebraska. from your previous corn pics, why bother with dryland corn there? iS  the insurance coverage better for corn? Are there more insect prblems with milo? Does is cost as much to produce? Is it hard to find a market? thanks

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Blacksandfarmer
Senior Advisor

Re: July 18 Milo Photos

Shaggy, your milo is looking good. Your dryland corn isn't looking very good. It started out nice though. Dryland corn in Kansas has got to be a tough game to play. As far as the chinch bugs, does the insecticide company label its product against chinch bugs? I had problems in a second year soybean field with Asiatic garden beetle grubs this year. I was really kicking myself for not using an insecticide seed treatment on my beans this year... Turns out the seed treatment wouldn't have controlled the pest anyway.

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Shaggy98
Senior Advisor

Re: July 18 Milo Photos

idalivered, to be honest I think my milo guarantee is higher than my corn guarantee because my APH is almost double for the milo.  I wasn't planting for an insurance check, I was wanting a 3 crop rotation for a few years to build up soil in my no-till operation.  I would have planted to soybeans, but I don't like leaving the ground bare all winter following bean harvest.  Wheat into corn stalks generally yields much better than wheat into soybean stubble and will definitely catch more blowing snow in the winter.

 

If we catch a summer where we can get frequent showers, dryland corn can be a wild card for your bottom line.  The trick is catching the rain.  I'm not sure if I will attempt it again in 2014, I'll see what the subsoil moisture situation is next spring and make a decision then.

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