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Senior Advisor

Re: Manure

I've got a 40 acre patch of alfalfa that needs to be torn out.  I was considering getting a first cutting from it next spring and letting it regrow enough that I could get a decent chemical kill of it.  Possibly harrow it back after it is dead, broadcast the teff seed and hit it with the harrow again.  Was hoping to get one or two cuttings of teff grass before winter than plant it to milo in 2016 and than back to alfalfa in 2017.  How's that for long range planning.  Smiley Very Happy

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Honored Advisor

Re: Manure

Shaggy, the Extension guys refer a lot of questions they get locally to us. Not that we are experts, but we are about the only hay producers/ grassfarmers in the county, something we hace been pursuing for at least 30 years.

In the twenty years we have been farmng in NC, we have seen a few non-swine producers with scraps of land in fescue predominantly. One guy jumped out to grow alfalfa on better soils elsewhere in the county. I heard his pricing, knew the crop's potential where he was is not much better than ours, and predicted he would not last a year...I am not sure he even made a second cutting.

Our use of manure as nutrient comes from hog farming, with stringent manure management regs. Wecannot boost application rates past the RYE level, inkess we document three years of production past that point of yield...sort of hard to do on crap land and with your hands tied, nutrientwise.

It is not really a " problem". W can get good quality and fairly good quantity, with waste as nutrient, low-input costs in terms of paid-for land and equipment, and mechanization to the point that we hire no one to help.

The use of green manure is certsinly a valud improvement strategy...we just aren't into breaking land out to turn anything in here. The best thing we see in our management approach is the return of earthworms to sterile mineral soils. They improve soil sructure and biota, better than anythng we could do.



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Honored Advisor

Re: Manure

Teff is new to me, so I haven't studied it in depth yet. sIL bought a bag and seeded it poorly last year...I think he said it was a warm season annual. If so, it would make a poor addition in akfalfa stands, as it would compete in the same growing season, right?

Sounds more like a good rotation with annual rye in winter, teff drilled into that stubble in spring, annual rye back into the teff stubble in fall.

Just my first take on teff, though.
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Senior Contributor

Re: Manure

Yes, it is very cold sensitive.
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Honored Advisor

Re: Manure

Check seeding recommendations fir teff. I am not sure what kind f eedbed t requires. Briadcast may or may not be good enough.

You have to plan far out, to stay out of your own way, right?
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