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Neonicotinoid's and how they affect the bee's

I am a student at Old's College, in Old's Alberta taking an Agribusiness course. For one of our classes we are doing a report on neonicotinoid's. My group and I would greatly apprecite it anyone can take 5 minutes out of their day and fill out the following questions:

 

1. What do you know about neonicotinoid?

 

2. Do you seed with neonicotinoid?

 

3. If yes, would you be upset if they were banned? Why?

 

4. Do you know how neonicotinoid work? 

 

5. Are you aware of how neonicotinoid are affecting the bees? What are your thoughts?

 

6. Is there an easy way to solve this problem by keeping the bee keepers and farmers happy?

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Frequent Contributor

Re: Neonicotinoid's and how they affect the bee's

"Neonicotinoids are a class of neuro-active insecticides chemically similar to nicotine. In the 1980s Shell and in the 1990s Bayer started work on their development.[1] Neonicotinoids cause less toxicity in birds and mammals than insects, compared to the previously used organophosphate and carbamate insecticides". Read more at; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonicotinoid

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Senior Contributor

Re: Neonicotinoid's and how they affect the bee's

The "neonicotinoid's" I've seen are often alkyl halides.  That is classically 'organic' chemicals which have been halogenated.  Halogenation polarizes organic chemicals so that they interact similarly to regular organic chemicals but the interaction is stronger due to the electron pull of the halide.  The strongest to weak of halides:  Flourine, Chlorine, Bromine, Iodine.  Bromides and Iodides are likely to be degenerated or undergo substitution by chlorine, which is a relatively common anion in the natural world.

 

Alkyl halides are almost never found in the natural world.  Iodine occationally plays a metabolic role.

 

Alkyl halides do not break down easily.  Don't be fooled by the stated half-life of drugs in this class of chemical.  While a portion of a chemical may be sloughed off, the remainder of the chemical structure is very resistant to biological decomposition.  These chemicals will often only pass through the bile duct, meaning the actual half-life may be 2-6 weeks.

 

Alkyl halides are known carcinogens.

 

 

Neonicotinoid suggest imitation of nicotine.  Nicotine has a chemical structure very close to that of niacin.  Niacin is a vitamin, meaning it is a dietary requirement of humans.  It is likely a dietary requirement of many animals.  It is a product of wild type yeast.  This is where most nicacin is derived from.

 

Nicotine probably interferes to some extent with niacin.  How, when and where I am not exactly sure.  It is "bio-degradable".

 

 

Neonicotinoid's are probably NOT biodegradable for the reasons I have stated.  You can expect poor health, metabolism, birth defects, cancer, climate change.

 

I have sprayed niacin with some success on plant tissue.  Niacin is required for photosynthesis in the form of NADH+.  Remember that plants do not even have a cardiovascular system, so any chemical interference of this sort will be difficult to reverse.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Neonicotinoid's and how they affect the bee's

Because you have asked this question (I always assume everyone is by far well aware of chemistry, hahaha)

 

you need to cease and desist all chemical production immediately.  This.

 

You need to get yourself a good English chemist who can tell you about these things.

 

 

 

DuPont has been operating in the US.  He uses extremely exotic reagents in his work.  He produces very inert products, however.

 

 

If someone were to attempt to follow his mechanics it would be very uncool.

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Senior Advisor

Re: Neonicotinoid's and how they affect the bee's

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