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Senior Contributor

Pod-ceal use in dry beans to prevent shatter

Has anyone used a product called Pod-ceal? Supposedly it reduces pod shatter. I think the active ingredient is cyclohexane. Just wondering if its worth the time and effort, for cranberry beans especially.
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Veteran Contributor

Re: Pod-ceal use in dry beans to prevent shatter

Its labeled for Brassica crops only, in Australia. I wouldn't try it on a bean crop (Fabaceae) personally, and that's not even addressing the questionable legality of using it off label (and trying to market the resulting crop as organic, if that be your plan). Basically, with beans your best bet is to continuely scout your fields to know the moment they're ready to harvest and to get it done as soon as field conditions permit.

 

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Senior Contributor

Re: Pod-ceal use in dry beans to prevent shatter

Hmm, I was on the company's website today, and they were promoting it for field peas and maybe dry beans. I can't remember the company name at this moment. Apparently it was developed for canola. Thanks for the input.
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Senior Contributor

Re: Pod-ceal use in dry beans to prevent shatter

The company is Brettyoung.
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Veteran Contributor

Re: Pod-ceal use in dry beans to prevent shatter

Well, further research says I spake too soon... the link I had based my previous statement off of was an Aussie company marketing it for canola, and it DOES in fact have a number of companies marketing it for use in straight-cutting canola.  There're also a number of companies that have it labeled for beans, but I can't say how effective it is, and without knowing how bad losses are without treatment, have no idea whether or not whatever it theoretically saves would be worth the cost of chem and application.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Pod-ceal use in dry beans to prevent shatter

Cranberry beans have had losses over 25% due to shatter. This is based on pod counts etc compared to actual yields. That's a huge loss if yields are a ton and the beans go for $1.00/lb. They say its made from a naturally occurring compound in some kind of plant. Is it turpintine? If so, that sounds nasty.
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