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Senior Advisor

Re: smart wildlife

Lots of geese through this area annually.  I'm not a hunter but am told it offers some good hunting on winter wheat fields as well as the few dryland corn fields the area has.

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Senior Contributor

Re: smart wildlife

There are well over 100,000 Canada geese that live in the Willamette Valley year round. The grass seed fields provide abundant grazing for them in the spring and fall. They can really make a mess of a newly planted grass seed field.
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Advisor

Re: smart wildlife

Try this on your sweet corn this year.  Plant a few rows of field corn in a circle around the patch of sweet corn.  We have a 20 inch 12 row planter.  We make 2 rounds, rows meeting to make a complete circle of 24 rows.

 

Stop laughing and try it, the coons will have a very hard time finding your sweet corn patch!

 

For the first time in memory we had beavers invade the family farm creek.  They sure can make mature cornstocks disappear in a hurry!  Local guy is trapping them, caught a 60 pounder and said he was only paid $5 or $10 (don't remember which) for it.  The dang thing ate a lot more corn than that!!

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Advisor

Re: smart wildlife

I saw on the local tv news this morning that winnebago county (iowa) supervisors are considering raising the bounty for beavers from $25 to $50. apparently costs of removing their dams is pushing this decision.

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Frequent Contributor

Re: smart wildlife

Several times I saw 2-4 deer standing where a waterway branches off.I stopped there once and they had pulled the shucks back and were eating the kernels off the cob,the outside row was a little shorter,perfect ear height for deer.

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Senior Contributor

Re: smart wildlife

oh deer

 

Ever have venison borscht?  Big chucks of meat with lots of sourcream.  mmm.  The borscht has to be hethanly red to endure the richness.  It is were the flavor, have I mentioned flavor, is presented.  As if you were a czar amoung a musty group of bolshiviks.

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Senior Contributor

Re: smart wildlife

    Plant a boarder strip of tempting forage,a sweet grass for the ultimate temptation<wonn't cure the problem of deer and elk eating your corn,but will help.Orchardgrass would be the best choice!

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Frequent Contributor

Re: smart wildlife

I know a guy that used to put a little plot of leftover seed and bin run corn on a little triangle of poor ground he had next to some creek pasture,as a wildlife area,thinking he would get the deer to stay out of his good ground.It didn't work,the deer just used that as a staging ground for their nighttime assaults on the good corn,he ended up tearing out the fence and seeding that down for pasture

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Advisor

Re: smart wildlife

that is a flawed theory. (from my experience) I rented part of a farm from a guy that fed lots of cattle. He always had alfalfa somewhere next to our corn. the deer would stand in the alfalfa field and eat the first row of corn. Just like they were lined up at the bunk. the corn and hay was great for deer production!! Usually lost most of the first row and some of the second row.

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Senior Contributor

Re: smart wildlife

I've tried it also. Seems like planting "ransom" crops just allow more deer to hang around longer after the crop growing season. Good for deer hunters not so much for farmers.
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