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Senior Contributor

Re: $207 per CSR Point/$16,560 per acre/SLOPE OF LAND IN THE CSR Rating!!! Very Important!!!!!

Yes Parkard27, Iowa CSR is really just a rough comparison between 2 different farms, one with a 88 CSR Rating WLL BE better than one with a 75 CSR Rating in general. But I have had some(notice I said some, not all) soil, that even with a 0 to 2% or less Slope it has a CSR Rating of 68 and it almost always does over 200, even 225+bu with normal weather. So, it really helps to have yield records back to 1986 to compare the 10 to 15+ different soil types that just 1 Iowa farm may have. I have almost always run into the issue as mentioned that the CSR is only 63, but it performs as well as 75+ CSR Dirt, meaning north of 200bu/acre. This has really shown up the last 5-9 years as corn seed has gotten better I believe. Along with pop rates now of as high as 38,500/acre on my high-quality over 85 CSR farmland dirt. Seems like just yesterday, high-quality Iowa dirt was only doing a pop rate of 32,500/acre, and now we are doing 38,500/acre with good results, meaning a nice yield increase. Plus moisture levels have been gradually dropping a little every year in general, a huge help in cutting my LP Gas Bill to dry my corn down to the ethanol plant required 15.5% level. More dollars in my pocket which is why we farm, actually more money to the "Little Lady"/the wife!!!!!!!  And yes, I have a high-maintance type of wife!!!!!!! LOL!!!!!!!  No, she has been a good wife, just kidding!!!! She came with a 91 CSR Rated Iowa corn farm that her father gave me to make sure I would marry her. Just a 160 acres, but ask Faust, most Iowa farm girls get at least a 1/4 section Iowa farm and some get a full section which is 640 acres for there wedding gift. You marry an Iowa farm girl today and a full section of top-quality Iowa corn dirt is worth as much as $10 MILLION DOLLARS!!!!! Makes you want to marry one today, doesn't it? When I married my wife back in 1985, a 160 acre top-quality Iowa corn farm was only worth around $160,000 or $1,000/acre. I got screwed!!!!!!! Just kidding, she brought in her 160 acres, and I owned 240 acres when we got married, but her farmland was debt-free, my 240 acres had debt on it. Anyway, I mortgaged all 400 acres of land my wife and I had when we got married and bought just 3 farms more in 1986, along with more farmland in 1988 and 1989. I was so highly-leveraged by the end of 1989 it was scary and made the cash-flow very rough. My wife worked full-time from 1985 till 1994, when we had children. Without her full-time job income to live on for 9 years we would have never made the once per year farmland bank mortgage payment. As you know, you never make monthly farmland mortgage payments, just once per year, generally in the March-April time period, and also just for 15 years, not the 30 years as for some Big-City fancy house. Big-City Fancy Houses are a total waste of your money as you know, but the wife needs a house to live in. Can I ask what state you own farmland in PACKARD27??????

Just curious if it is Iowa too!!!!! Thanks!!!

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Senior Advisor

Re: $207 per CSR Point/$16,560 per acre/SLOPE OF LAND IN THE CSR Rating!!! Very Important!!!!!

It's about time for a smoke out boys.  Looks like we've got a rat in the hole.Smiley Surprised

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Senior Contributor

Re: $207 per CSR Point/$16,560 per acre/SLOPE OF LAND IN THE CSR Rating!!! Very Important!!!!!

That's an interesting thought Shaggy98, take Iowa farmland that has good-quality NICOLENT LOAM Soil which has around a 88 CSR Rating with a 0 to 2% and less SLOPE, take the same NICOLENT LOAM Soil with a 2 to 4% SLOPE/GRADE which has a 77 CSR Rating and level it out to a 2% or less SLOPE which would increase the total average farm's CSR Rating on this section of 2-4% SLOPE to an 88 CSR Rating. Interesting, but I have never, ever, seen this done in Iowa that I am aware of. I would never even know what the cost would be to level out say 20 to 40 acres from a 4% SLOPE to one less than 1%. This would increase the CSR on this 40 acres to 88, which is a good thing, but the cost????? I have no idea on the cost issue. I would think if it was cost-effective to try, would think some farmers would try it, MAYBE??????? i just don't know at all on the cost. Anybody have a guess??? I sure don't!!!!! I know for a fact, that farm drainage tiling is almost always an excellent decision to spend money on to max your farms corn yields, but farmland leveling is completely out of my ballpark, it would be an extremely interesting project to try-out howver, but the dollar pay-back numbers have me completely in over my head. Maybe if "OR" when hIGH-QUALITY Iowa farmland hits $240 per CSR Point we will find out. But I just don't see a $240 per CSR Point Level being "HIT" for at least 5 years or longer. Maybe I am wrong on this $240 CSR Point Resistance Level, but boy, $240 per CSR Point would be a huge price level for even the "Best of the Best" Iowa dirt. Yes, it would be an Iowa dream of mine, but really, it doesn't accomplish much for me unless I thought of selling s couple of my farms. Otherwise, it really means nothing to me at all. A small paper gain on your NET WORTH STATEMENT at the bank is all, barely worth the 10 cents per page of the paper it's on!!!!!! LOL

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Senior Contributor

Re: $207 per CSR Point/$16,560 per acre/SLOPE OF LAND IN THE CSR Rating!!! Very Important!!!!!

RSW,

 

Great explanation and a solid life story too. I also had the great fortune (i.e. dumb luck) to marry a small town Iowa girl in1979. Her Irish great, great, great, grandfather came over via boat & then covered wagon to Chickasaw County. Once arrived, he bought some newly opened farmland a decade or so before the Civil War.

 

Amazingly, that same small farm (<240 acres) remained within the same Irish family for these past 160 years. I give a deep bow and a humble acknowledgment to my wife's ancestors. Holding a family farm together through a Civil War, two great depressions, several financial panics, multiple local & national farm crises, two world wars, and a host of natural disasters, was truly a remarkable achievment. Luck alone cannot explain what those men and their wives did to keep that farm together to this day. "Ain't that America?"

 

My own career path was much more pedestrian. Son of a Des Moines doctor, Hawkeye history grad in 1979, 20 years in the USMC, 10 years as an educational researcher at UW-Madison,wrote a book on decision making theory and then hung out a shingle as an LLC business consultant for these past five years. zzzzzzz

 

May our paths cross one day,

Packard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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