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Senior Contributor

92 Day Corn

There is still alot of unplanted Corn in North Iowa, there/the seed guys are starting to hold meetings on switching to 92 day corn. I believe this is as rough as 1993 was. 92 corn or soybeans is about our only choice at this stage of the game. You sure are not going to get 220bu yields with 92 day corn seed. It is shaping up to be a very bad year in Iowa.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: 92 Day Corn

This is an interesting corn trial from Bath SD from last year RSW. Seems short day hybrids do yield well. They may yield well, but the weather has to be just right in that short window. Something to also look at is the seeding population. I hope you find this useful.

http://www.firstseedtests.com/Reports/2012/B2SDNEbath.pdf

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Senior Contributor

Re: 92 Day Corn

Hey, thanks Blacksand for the information. I don't think I have ever planted  corn less than 102 day before. If 92 Day corn could do 160 to 180bu, I would be one happy camper. This is on dirt that does at least 220bu given good weather, 80+CSR dirt, so top-quality Iowa stuff. I have nitrogen down on one 160 acre field already, so still going to try corn, the other 160 acre field has no nitrogen down, so may switch to soybeans on that one. Anyway, I will read the information you posted, we are kinda like the Blind leading the Blind here in North-Central Iowa, no one has a really good answer to our problem since we don't face this type of problem all that often.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: 92 Day Corn

RSW since I farm in the eastern cornbelt I am accustomed to wet springs. 2011 was a nightmare for most of us. Big nitrogen washing rains early followed by extreme hot and dry in July. You might want to think about sidedress N if you haven't already.

 

Bsand out.

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Senior Contributor

Re: 92 Day Corn

Yes, we do alot of sidedressing nitrogen during the crop year. It is always painful to see that yellow streak in the middle of the corn leaf that means it ran out of nitrogen and the yield will not be top-notch. This is not the same issue as to when there is excess moisture and the whole leaf turns yellow, just that yellow streak down the middle of the leaf that means it ran out of gas/nitrogen. This whole crop year in Northern Iowa is turning into a nightmare unless the Water God in the Sky decides to turn the water off for a couple of weeks. I certainly do not see a bumper yield for North-Central Iowa this year.

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Senior Contributor

Re: 92 Day Corn

Rsw. While running your numbers on insurance one thing comes to mind. If one takes pp instead of growing a crop will that payment still be able to take advantage of fall harvest price. My thinking here is one takes pp and gets a check for a % of their guarantee. Harvest comes around and we are terribly short on production and our crop insurance value goes up in October. One would have been better growing a short crop with a higher value then throwing in the towel and taking a 5.60 something today. I don't know the answer. Just asking a global question. As to our post about 92 day corn. I have a variety that was 2nd in my plot back in 2010 that was a 92 day. Just laid in a pretty good supply for late and replant. Not trying to sell anything here but I would not be afraid of planting one for a decent yield. Good luck......MikeM
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Veteran Contributor

Re: 92 Day Corn

Check my post in marketing.  PP if you have RP still has a harvest price option.

 

http://community.agriculture.com/t5/Marketing/N-Iowa-farmer/td-p/346549/highlight/false/page/2

 

Just to cover my butt I better say double check with your agent.  I got this from my agent.

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Senior Contributor

Re: 92 Day Corn/ 2 Mikes

Thanks Mike and Mike, 2 Mikes!!!!! LOL

Yes, I am checking PP right now. Seems one year I had 40 acres that I couldn't get planted to corn, took the PP Payment and then planted Soybeans. I wasn't allowed to insure the beans, but I could still plant them. As I  remember, the Corn PP Check and then 48-50bu beans on top of that PP corn check, my per acre ROI/Profit was pretty good!!!!! But I do know for a fact that you can't insure the beans with Crop Insurance after doing PP on the corn acres. Running numbers, but doing PP Corn and then doing Uninsured beans on the PP Corn acres and getting 40-50bu/acre beans seems like a possible choice too.I just don't know, it is turning into a regular little NIGHTMARE!!!!!! Well, things can always be worse, the really good profits last year will help carry this year.

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Advisor

Re: 92 Day Corn

90 day corn generally does 150ish. However, it can and has done 200 bu yields in the appropriate environment.
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Senior Advisor

Re: 92 Day Corn

What Iowa State is saying:

 

"When to Switch to a Shorter Season Hybrid?
 Work done by several seed companies and universities, including Iowa State University, has shown that full season adapted hybrids will out yield shorter season hybrids even when planting is delayed. Roger Elmore had studies in 2010-2011 that showed that full season hybrids yielded more than shorter season hybrids even when planted in late June at Crawfordsville http://www.ag.iastate.edu/farms/11reports/Southeast/RegionalCornReplantSE.pdf. Does this mean we should stick to full season hybrids even with a late June planting? That would have been the right decision at Crawfordsville in those 2 years, but may not be the right decision this year, depending on what the rest of the season brings and on when the first freeze hits. Planting corn in late June is risky to begin with and sticking to full season hybrids increases the risk that it won’t make it to maturity if we do have an early frost. The research does show that we don’t want to switch to shorter season hybrids too soon and don’t want to get carried away and switch to very short season hybrids, but as planting and re-planting gets delayed further into June, I would back off to something shorter than full season corn to reduce the risk of having very wet, poor quality corn in the fall."

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