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Senior Contributor

“Aquacheck,” a rod implanted in the soil whose sensors

Does anyone have any experience with these Aquacheck? Just curious. It says it only takes 4 to cover a 1/4 section so not bad. Article is below or part of the newspaper article:

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Iowa, with its annual average of 37 inches of rain, has never been considered prime territory for irrigation equipment. But those farmers who need to monitor soil moisture on a regular basis could look over “Aquacheck,” a rod implanted in the soil whose sensors send data on soil moisture to a farmer’s computer.

“About two of these devices will cover 80 acres,” said Josh Potter, who sells Aquacheck for the Van Wall Group based in Perry.

Potter said Aquacheck has been used mostly in Nebraska and Western states to monitor soil moisture levels for center pivot irrigation.

“But with the drought, now there’s more interest in equipment like this in dry-land farming in Iowa and elsewhere,” said Potter.

 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: “Aquacheck,” a rod implanted in the soil whose sensors

I have heard of some experiments with them.   The 4 per quarter section is only on flat, even ground.   If you have rolling ground, or several different soil types, the number goes up substantially.

About all I can say that I know, is that the University was doing some tests with them, and on rolling/hilly/uneven ground, it was saying that some areas of the field were too wet, and others were too dry, at the same time (Heck, they could have given me the money, and I could have told them that, LOL).

Currently, if I remember right, they are trying to set them up on a center pivot irrigated field, to regulate when and how fast the pivot moves, to water different parts of the field, only as much as needed.   I think if you field was flat, or at least the slopes laid out in a favorable way, it could have potential to save some water and not hurt yield.

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Friend

Re: “Aquacheck,” a rod implanted in the soil whose sensors

I have worked with the Aquacheck probes and it is one of the best technologies to use for monitoring soil moisture. It is true that the more variation there is in the landscape the more probes you will need, but if the positioning of the probes in the field is done properly then it can tell you a lot about what is going on in the soil. The other benefit of the Aquacheck probe is the quality, you can leave it in the soil for 3 years without needing to fix components. Hope that helps!

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Senior Advisor

Re: “Aquacheck,” a rod implanted in the soil whose sensors

What good would they do in dryland, can't make it rain or stop raining can it? Irrigation I understand, but dryland would be just an empty investment.
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