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5 Replies
Veteran Advisor

Re: Big M docs released

Good read Bruce, Im in my early 30's, and seeing many people my age getting cancers that typically effect older people is alarming. I give it 10 more years and row cultivator's will be the "new" weed control. 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Big M docs released

H 'mmmmm   what a surpriZe 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Big M docs released

That story sounds possible, maybe even plausible, but I gotta ask...Fake News???   In todays world, that could be a real possibility as well.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Big M docs released

Observing some soybean weed issues on a recent outing  - seems the monoculture's have issues ---

 

NOW WHAT ?

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Big M docs released

"THE GLYPHO-SPOTLIGHT KEEPS SHINING: Even while on recess, it seems lawmakers have glyphosate on the mind. House Oversight Chairman Trey Gowdy is following in the footsteps of his predecessor in the chairmanship, former Rep. Jason Chaffetz, in demanding answers from the National Institutes of Health over its funding and the participation of its staff in the International Agency for Research on Cancer's 2015 report that determined the herbicide, which is a key ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup Ready products, is a probable carcinogen.
The issue of the day: Gowdy wants to know why NIH's National Cancer Institute chose not to publish data that was said to be ready in 2013, which found no evidence the weedkiller causes cancer, in time for it to be used in the IARC report. In a letter to NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Tuesday, Gowdy argued the Agricultural Health Study's findings related to the health risks of the herbicide could have led IARC not to classify the chemical as a probable carcinogen.
Gowdy's letter made reference to a Reuters report that cited a deposition of Dr. Aaron Blair, a researcher on the NCI study who also participated in the IARC review. The deposition was taken as part of an ongoing lawsuit from U.S. farmers who allege Monsanto knew the cancer risks associated with its chemical. In the deposition, Blair said the data would have changed IARC's analysis. He told Reuters the data was not published because it was too voluminous to wrap into a single report.
Gowdy doesn't buy that explanation. "The committee is concerned about these new revelations, especially given Dr. Blair's apparent admission that the AHS study was 'powerful,' and would alter IARC's analysis of glyphosate," the letter said. Gowdy gave NIH a deadline of Aug. 22 to produce communications related to the study, specifically communications that involved Blair. More here."

 

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