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Senior Advisor

Corn Loss From Diseases

This is from Daren Mueller ( Iowa State ) And Kiersten Wise  - (Purdue )  Off of the Chat 'N' Chew Cafe - This info is from the top 22 corn producing states , The loss from disease is mind bogling to me - This data is from 2012 - the first of it's kind to be done -

 

I couldn't make up my mind if this should go in production or business sections on here - but the amount of loss = the dollars lost , then I put it here , and besides - there's only like 6 people that read production on here - lol

 

So after you read this - heres some questions

1. What would corn price been if we had not lost all them bu.s? and remember this was in 2012 = druoght

2. So in a good year , will the loss numbers go up or down ?

3. Is this loss from - poor scouting , poor hybribs , OR money = do's it pay OR screw it - crop insurance will pick it up ?

4. Peak Corn ? -Not if we can cut the loss from disease .

5. New seed coming down the line - What will it cost to control this problem

6. What will you do to cut these losses on your farm - Boys that a load of cash going out the window .

 

Anyway - Have a great Sunday  Smiley Happy

 

BTW Light Freezing Rain here this moring Smiley Mad = Jeffs fault

http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/BP/BP-96-12-W.pdf

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Honored Advisor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

So much of what is in that disease list shows up or increases as a function or result of other problems.  They are not the primary problem.

Present example.  Disease was high in 2012.  But was yield loss from disease or drought?  We would have gained from controling disease, but would we have gained enough to pay for the disease prevention in a disease promoting year.

 

Often like trying to cure the symptoms of something greater we can't control.

 

 

--------------------------

 

Seed companies are long on promise ------------------------------------- 

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Advisor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

It's too tough to even breakeven on fung.... 14.5 for the app if they show up

This is an in il Iowa thing. For the rest of us we might gain 1bu in non trial fields and lose a lot of money.

I have considered fung on beans, but only those that actually have a ridiculous amount of flowers or pods.

Its really a field selective practice IMO..
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Senior Contributor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

At the very least it should be farm selective. Fungicide may be a thing we need to think of as insurance to pay off big in a bad year. Even if you don't get a return on your investment every year.
I've been thinking about cutting back on some inputs. Not sure which ones or how much of each. Every time I start studying the subject I come back to the same conclusion: it may save a little money some years but maybe setting my self up for a big loss under certain conditions.
It's giving me a headache. Where's that "white pickup truck".

Note: see white pickup truck on YouTube. I can't post links from this phone.
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Honored Advisor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

thanks buck,  warmed up a cold day.   I like the one he did about his daughters also.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

Drinking milk and eating doughnuts? When I Custom shelled corn that my agronomist had out for himself, he brought me a burger king whopper and a 12 pack!
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Honored Advisor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

Here it's a red pickup and he knows my vices --------- always doughnuts with a cinnamon roll stuck in there somewhere.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

Those jayhawks are pretty talented I guess. That guy and the Paeterson brothers. You know it's a good parody when you here the real song and all you accually hear and sing along with are the parody words.
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Senior Advisor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

That white pickup covered just about everybody around here Bucky - lol  

 

But here's a quote of yours -- Every time I start studying the subject I come back to the same conclusion: it may save a little money some years but maybe setting my self up for a big loss under certain conditions.
It's giving me a headache

 

I know what you mean - But maybe I can help - just a little - I have been in the Production side of Ag - really since 1976 - first job after school was working at a fert. plant , nut how times have changed since them days - they is a lot of info out there ! and with the internet and tablets is never ending -  What has helped me most was going back to school - so to speak - like attending classes up at West Lafayette in the summer - Most classes are held out in the field - so we can see and learn first hand on disease and pest problems -boy has that helped my headache problems - some what .

Last year - i was worried about gray leaf - I knew what to look for - but for some reason - I questioned my decision not to spray - just happenedto be a all day class up north so went and can home feeling better , then  in Aug. Dr. Kiersten Wise stopped by to look at a problem in my beans - I asked her to look at my corn and she what she thought - Good call she said not to spray . After this ramble - the point is do the most to help your self to make them decisions and don't leave it to somebody that wants to put cash in there pockets - Spraying IF you have a problem will make you money - but knowing when NOT to spray will do the same = make you money . Hit the books Young man - lol

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Contributor

Re: Corn Loss From Diseases

  • Fungi are multicellular filamentous organisms that are usually microscopic, but sometimes form fruiting bodies visible to the naked eye.  Fungi typically produce spores that may infest crop debris, reside on seeds, or remain in the soil.  Fungal spores can also serve as a means for long distance spread of these organisms.
  • Bacteria are microscopic single celled organisms and are typically spread by splashing rain or insect vectors.
  • Viruses are sub-microscopic and generally must be carried to and injected into the plant by plant feeding insects or nematodes.
  • Soilborne diseases are typically chronic problems requiring an ongoing management program, that may include rotation and (or) resistant hybrids.
  • Seedborne pests can often be eliminated through seed treatments, sanitation, or the use of disease free seed.
  • Airborne pathogens of corn are best managed through the use of resistant hybrids and sometimes cultural practices.
    • Rotate crops.
    • Destroy crop residue.
    • Plant resistant varieties.
    • Observe proper planting dates.
    • Fertilize properly.
    • Harvest at proper time.
    • Store corn properly.
    • Treat seed.
    • Control nematodes with nematicides according to recommendations.
    • Use best management practices to minimize other pest problems.
    • There is less johnsongrass in the coastal plain area.
    • The johnsongrass in the piedmont is infected with the two viruses while the johnsongrass in other sections of the state is not as heavily infected, or not infected at all.
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