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Veteran Contributor

Re: Do any of you from eastern Nebrask know this guy? (dairy stuff)

I dont live by the nebraska ones but do farm close by and the only complaint I have ever personally had is all the milk semis going up and down the road.  The manure gets applied to near by fields and the hay business for them has created opportunity for alot of local farmers.  They also will chop your fields for silage and pay you for it which alot of people consider a good deal, no harvest, better  net,  only problem is they pay for the silage so much every month over the entire year cause that fits their cash flow better and you are unprotected if there is a bankruptcy i would guess.  From what I have seen in nebraska of it I wouldnt be afraid of them.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Do any of you from eastern Nebrask know this guy? (dairy stuff)

Bigger isn't neccessary better, remember the hog industry.  No one around me wants to raise hogs, no one wants to milk, so the small town down towns are dieing off.  

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Reader

Re: Do any of you from eastern Nebrask know this guy? (dairy stuff)

 

Hi Workman,

I live in Nebraska on a farm. I know where my food comes from. I buy my beef from a local neighbor. I know the difference in taste and nutritional value between a store bought chicken and one that can run around outside and fed what good for the chicken and my family. The cow I buy has not been raised in a feedlot. And it has not been processed in a huge slaughter house where my hamburger is combined with a thousand other cows and then rinsed in ammonia to kill the bacteria so the processing process won‘t kill me. The farmer I buy my food from makes the profit and the local butcher not Wal-Mart. I grow a garden and still do home canning. I shop at local farmers markets. I admit some times you are going to see me at Walmart but that’s because they have driven out my other choices. 

I would rather help keep the choice possible for my grandchildren to buy food locally and support the local economy than an industrial food system controlled buy a few mega corporations . I think its not a bad thing that more people are discovering their kitchens again, and are being educated where their industrialized food is coming from. I see even Wal-Mart is paying attention to what a growing number of consumers want and has jumped on the band wagon trying to convince them that the small percentage of local food they stock makes up for all the other crap they sell. I think that’s going to give walmart the warm fuzzy feeling they are looking for from a the few consumers that are just starting to care about where their food comes from but the educated or older generation that knows better its going to take a little more than token farmers here and there to convert them. And eventually even walmart will run out of the supply of local farmers that could exist on the price walmart will pay for their products unless they can manage to find a way to own the farmer.

Wouldn’t you prefer it if in the future your grand kids can instead of popping irradiated amalgamated prostituted reconstituted, adulterated, modified and artificially flavored extruded bar coded un-pronounceable things into the microwave, could actually prepared real foods? If not I hope your sperm count is as high as you IQ.

The next thing your going to say is with out the industrial food system how are we going to feed the growing population. As part of the WWII war effort, the U.S. government rationed food and called on citizens to plant “Victory Gardens” to grow their own fruits and vegetables. Twenty million Americans planted Victory Gardens in back yards, empty lots and even on rooftops. It was estimated that Victory Gardens provided up to 40 percent of the nation’s food supply. I have faith that when put to the challenge farmers again can find alternative ways to meet demands that don’t include all the unhealthy, environmentally damaging practices and give consumer what they need.

We have an abundance of food in our country, more Americans are obese or overweight than ever before but 49 million Americans suffer from hunger. Even Iowa, the so-called “Food Capital of the World,” ranks 26th in the United States in the prevalence of hunger (food insecurity), with 11.6 percent of Iowa’s citizens lacking access to enough food to fully meet their basic needs at all times due to lack of financial resources.

I don’t know how to fix the broken food system. I just try to support local farmers who grow food for me that I know is raised with care, save to eat, supports the local community, and cares about the environment. CAFO’s are growing problem in today’s agriculture – that reduces profits returned to farmers--cause damage to the environment and is increasing concentration of market power in the hands of a few corporations like Walmart.

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Senior Advisor

Re: Do any of you from eastern Nebrask know this guy? (dairy stuff)

Why would anyone sell their crop to another party that is not bonded at $5 a bushel on a pay as you go agreement---so if a few  "BTO" go under we will all starve--seems if the operation was so efficient  why bother building another somewhere else---borrow some more money from the neighbors and stay put or go to the southwest and buy one already in place---plenty for sale in TX -ARIZONA- NM- CA.-- with permits already in hand--just add money---I never heard of food shortages in the 60's 70's or 80's so starving isn't the issue--hope you didn't sell feeder cattle to eastern BTO -might be a long wait for your $$$$ 

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