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Senior Contributor

CRP

One thing I've never liked about CRP is it is another government entity looking over your shoulder as a producer.  It's great for those who don't really want to farm, but not good for those who do, in my opinion.  I've never used it for myself but I signed up some land of my mother's when I ran her farm for her.  The government wants to tell us what to do enough as it is, without me selling out to them.

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Senior Contributor

Re: crap is a disaster

the point is simple why should people be paid NOT to work and what is the difference in one welfare whore and another one

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Senior Contributor

Re: CRP

if the gov pays you not to work they should own you and tell you every move to make like they do the blacks when it is time to vote --the crap program is made to hurt the food supply --young farmers and taxpayers ----now you tell me the advantage of this useless dinosaur

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Senior Contributor

Re: CRP

Many, many years ago, I managed to  get to talk to John Block, secretary of agriculture, when he was on a talk show.

I asked the question "Does the United States have, maybe not officially, a cheap food policy. His asnwer was "YES"

We want to keep  plentiful and cheap enough food so that this country would never fave a food crisis. We want to keep make sure that farmers do not go bankrupt and stay in business. He remembered the real threats that faced people in Germany and Japan immediately after WW2 and the policy of the government was that this should not be possible in this country.

I also think that agriculture may be better off financially today without government interference, but would the country be as well off?

Ethanol is not quite the culprit that some believe. In case of a crop disaster (Blight Years), the supply of grain could be used for humans.

What would be the price of petroleum products if  there were no ethanol

Our imports would be much higher and transfer of money out of this country would increase.

So there is no black and white argument either side

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Senior Advisor

Re: CRP

Just an opinion but I like the fact that they seed down acres that never should have been plowed in the first place. The best crop for such fragile soils is grass with cows and calves on it.

 

We had 4 acres that I signed up for my landlord so that I didn't have to farm it. She got all the proceeds and I got to farm the rest without the hassle of trying to navigate 12 row equipment in a small field next to a river bank. Good for her. Good for me and good for nature and the wildlife that visits there.

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Senior Contributor

Re: CRP

except the shortest resource is water and it takes 1.1 gallon of water to make 1 gallon of ethanol and it is the most corrosive fuel you can use --so how does it improve anything

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Senior Contributor

Re: CRP

here they destroy the whole farm to cut down on the food supply as fast as possible-and then plant it in weeds and charge the taxpayer 300 dollars plus per acre for-the right to rape them

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Senior Advisor

Re: CRP

Sorry to hear you are a victim of a sex crime. How does someone else receiveing an incentive to preserve fragile lands hurt you? They would rent it to you anyway. You got an attitude problem.

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Senior Contributor

Re: CRP

it is the taxpayer who gets raped by welfare whores --the land isnt fragile it is who had the best connections --and we dont rent we OWN---maybe next time you need to take more time before you run off at the mouth ---aint this fun--it is too easy with obamoites--and we dont call the payoff not ot work an incentive it is a welfare ck --for those who refuse to work and hate poor people trying to make food higher

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Frequent Contributor

Re: Ethanol, CRP and high food prices

There seems to be a few points that need clarification regarding the CRP discussion going on here.  First, there is the CRP program and there is the CREP program.  The CREP (conservation reserve enhancement program)  differs from the CRP program in that it (CREP) is designated to protect specific targeted environmental concerns.  In my state (Kentucky) only certain counties were able to put land in the program that was targeted to protect the Green River watershed. 

 

About 98,000 acres were targeted and achieved in the program.  The contracts were for either 10 or 15 years and the land was seeded in native grasses / vegetation.  Initially, there was a $100 per acre incentive paid to sign up in addition to the yearly  rental payment.  My understanding is that some rental rates were over in the low $200 per acre range.  Add to that the $100 signup incentive and you get a little over $300 per acre but that was just for the first year.  I know of other land that was put in the program for $140 per acre.  All depended on where the land was at.  

 

The thing that got me about the program is that the land put in the program did not have to have a cropping history.  I know of many fields that had been in hay/pasture that were killed out and planted in the native vegetation.  In addition, the rental rates of $140-$200 plus per acre far exceeded rental rates in the area for farming purposes.  In most cases it was more than double what anyone was paying for good ground much less rolling pasture land.  

 

Hope I have not confused or misinformed anyone.  I am not an authority on the subject but am just relaying my limited experience with the subject.     

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