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rosstaylor2440
Frequent Visitor

Re: Family Farms - Feminize Or Die

These are the nice thought's and good observation. Now days there are so many changes are identifyed if we take a look of our general life . 'young woman wants to return to the farm' womens are also feeling strong enough to making their own in the marketting and for the farm expansion that shows active participation of womens in tha farm as equal to the men's activity.

 

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Kay/NC
Honored Advisor

Re: Family Farms - Feminize Or Die

Actually, the posters here who write about the young women they know opting for country life are more speaking of ones who have rejected other careers, and embraced " traditional" feminine roles. This relates to the fantasy farm life I wrote about, too.

Women's liberation took real traction about when I was graduating from college in 1975. At that point in history, the Superwoman myth was at full steam. Time has shown that it is exceedingly difficult to do an exemplary job of homemaking, mothering, and pursuing the corner office, all at once.

Those women who succeed at the combination have usually got a retinue of other people taking a lot of the burden alongside them. That might be a husband who subjugates his own external achievements, grandparents who take a lot of the childrearing duties on again for their grandchildren's benefit, a stable of nannies and housekeepers, or a combination of these and more.

It is very hard -if not impossible -to do everything and do it all well. What I think you are seeing now is a generation of young women who recognize that being " liberated" means being worked half to death. Most working women put in the equivalent of two shifts per day...one at the workplace, the other at home.

I stepped out of this rat race at the birth of our first child, and managed to mostly avoid leaving our three kids with caregivers, with one exception with the youngest one from age 3.5 to kindergarten. That was not the norm in my generation. I know friends now who are shocked that I keep my grandson, so our daughter can work the farm with her daddy.

These girls who want a few animals, a big garden, and time with their children, aren't coming back to the land to build a career in business. They are looking for the Earth Mother experience. Some may morph that into farming and business partnership, as I did...but, I was the oldest of three daughters of a big farmer (for our area and era), so I had been reared like a boy, working at virtually every task a son would have done. That wasn't " normal" for ,y generation of girls, either.
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Jim Meade / Iowa City
Senior Advisor

Re: Family Farms - Feminize Or Die

When I first posted this topic, I had clearly in my mind that I was talking about the family farm in the old sense, the mythical farm based on a strong heritage.  It was the farm where the couple shared very strongly in the enterprise even when they did different tasks.

What I did not say was there are and I think will continue to be many farms of all sizes that are more what I would call an industrial model.  That is the farm where the family resides and enjoys much of the rural life style but where one partner, usually the man, is the primary farm worker and the other either works at home but not as involved as grandmother or works in town.

The guy who farms and his wife stays at home and works the garden is the industrial model, I think.

The reason I said I think the family farm (the one worked by both people in some combination of tasks) has to feminize is that I think women feel economically and socially empowered to demand more say.  The family farm will, therefore, have a woman who speaks her piece and makes decisions as an equal.

If either partner is the primary farmer and the other has little say in or contribution to the farm (other than the town paycheck) then I think it is an industrial model.  There are women who are perfectly comfortable being the supportive partner and leave farming to the man and there are women who find enrichment in their town job and don't feel the need to partner in the farm.

The woman seeking the Earth Mother experience are just a variation of the stay at home mom of the 50's and 60's when every union worker had a house, car, pickup and camper and stay at home mom.  Now, she's moved from Levittown to the acreage.

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Kay/NC
Honored Advisor

Re: Family Farms - Feminize Or Die

jim, perhaps it is a matter of nomenclature. " Traditional" usually goes back to what each of us recalls from childhood to our early adulthood. Each generation has a different definition, when it comes to the fine points.

The Earth Mother arose in the sixties-seventies, as a countermovement to liberation, industrialization, etc. Women had hardly left the home, until WWII, when Rosie became a riveter, remember? Thre were exceptions, as during the Civil War, if you believe Scarlett O'Hara's story.

The reliance on subsistence agriculture in many rural households for much of our nation's history is " traditional", too. Married women were specifically prohibited from teaching school, for example. Even when we came along, pregnant ones had to step down, before they started to show. Now, some of them are conceiving children by their minor male students....

Most of these decisions are driven by finances. Even the " wife goes to town for benefits" model is a family money needs accommodation, isn't it?

Women didn't get " liberated" until the earning power of men started to erode...the GI benefits that built Levittown et al, couldn't be floated forever. Tha generation got amply rewarded for its sacrfices, as was only right;but , those costs may have gotten deferred onto the shoulders of their daughters.



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