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Senior Advisor

Re: Good scientists

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There are two groups of climate change scientists. Those that identify with what the data tells them and those that listen to oil companies.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Good scientists/BADEERE

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Hope your custom farmer doesn't read these $$$ amounts --- 

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Veteran Contributor

Re: Good scientists/BADEERE

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I have shown you my certified yields, I outyielded you by 35 bushels per acre.  Figure the ROI on that.  I also own my farmground.  It is sad to see how you treat your wife!  Maybe she will dump you and take her farmland with her someday!

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Senior Contributor

Re: Good scientists

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A lot of management including the planting of GMO seeds goes into raising +200 bu corn but there always seems to be a couple of other factors that get in the way of a constant yield increase over time. Weather is always the deciding factor. GMO seeds soften the blow on secondary problems that are not always present. Claims are made that nonGMO crops yield just as good. They will without those yield robbing factors present. I look at that as not buying hail insurance one year and you don't get hail....Mike!
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Veteran Contributor

Re: Good scientists

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Are the RW traits effective anymore?  They are a low dose event thus how effective can they be and for how long since RW are developing reistance.  Know of a lot of people who have insecticide attachment on planters this year that never used to.  Cornborer bT is no longer needed as the population has dwindled.  Rup is relegated to a post emerge grass herbicide but with a $20 per acre tech fee.  Are you still a salesman for Syngenta?

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Senior Contributor

Re: Good scientists

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Yes I am. I have insecticide attachments and use them every year on every corn acre. I'm not worried about resistance. Young roots can't express the trait until it is larger so insects can do damage. Of course with 1000+ gross revenue per acre it is easy to justify another $12 cost per acre. We have another trait event being released for commercial sale next year called Duracade. It is a multiple mode action trait against root worms. By putting that trait with our Viptera trait, it will control all above and below ground insects. A little damage done by a few bugs can start adding up.....MikeM
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Advisor

Re: Good scientists/BADEERE

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@Mike NCIA wrote:

I had better crops than you RSW and I planted non-GMO


Mike, nice to see someone North of I-80 that has some common sense regarding non-gmo seeds.   With all the comments regarding spiking chemical spray tanks with "old chemicals" we used to use before roundup to control weeds, it kinda makes one think that if one would just switch back to those older chemicals and pay $24 a bag for seed beans or $125 a bag for seed corn, that they could cut costs quite significantly.  

 

I mean, if the resistance to RR is not there anymore, why purchase a seed with that trait and pay the $17 tech fee plus $15 more for alleged patents that you did not ask for.  I can purchase quite a bit of chenical for $40 an acre for soybeans.  

 

But, I guess when your seed dealer is your "partner", your machinery dealer is your "partner", your banker is your "partner", your chemical dealer is your "partner, your agronomist is your "partner", kinda hard to not let all those partners farm the farmer, and get paid first before the partner sucking hind **bleep** gets his cut.  

 

In Ohio, you can purchase generic seed from the Ohio State  (seed with no name aka your own brand) without any patented traits for around $25 an acre, and hold back your own seed without any infringement problems.  RR1 expires next year, but if the rag weeds have grown resistance to it why buy the trait and pay the tech fee? (this year I put down 1/2 pt of 24D with a quart fo Glyo to kill them.  

 

Does not take a mental giant, to do the calculation, of how much input costs can be reduced by saving your own seed.  Seed beans out of the bin at $13 makes more   sense than seed beans from a dealer makes at $55, and having to all the BS that goes with making the sale.

 

But . . . if you do plant your own seed, you will not get that little green hat and that little green jacket so you can look like the farmer, cough, cough, I mean grower on TV in the ad prepared by Madison Avenue.   But . . . look on the bright side you might be able to send your kid to Harvard with the savings instead of Iowa State.   John

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Senior Contributor

Re: Good scientists/BADEERE

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John, one little thing you forget to mention in your post is there are no guarantees with that plan. A good seed dealer who has developed a trust with his customers will go to bat for them when there is a problem. That includes the planting of nonGMO seeds. Unless you are willing to protect your crop the traditional way and some aren't, that is one large gamble and few guarantees come with that plan.....MikeM
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Veteran Contributor

Re: Good scientists

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On the other hand the larger the corn plant the lower the amount of bT toxin as it is diluted with the mass of the corn plant.  As I said a low dose event is not very effective.  Why even purchase the trait if you are set up to apply product?  Is it because the companies (sYNGENTA, Monsanto a Pioneers plan) to only sell the newer numbers fully traited?

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Senior Contributor

Re: Good scientists

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Mike, It's my understanding that the more the mass of a corn plant the more trait available to do its job. As in rw traits, the larger the root, the more toxin available to ingest. Fewer problems arise by planting fully traited hybrids. Seed companies don't like service calls because of a failure and the failure % is lower with fully traited products. One doesn't have to purchase fully traited hybrids. Syngenta sells a nice line of refuge corn...MikeM
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