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Senior Contributor

Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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Here’s a non political, but idle curiosity Ag question for you. 

Assuming the ownership of a single living steer or hog, how far do suppose an average midwest farmer might have to travel to have his or her one animal professionally slaughtered, aged, sliced, diced, and otherwise packaged into individual cuts for the freezer?

In other words, is this a rare sort of Ag service with little demand, or are there multiple people in the different counties around Iowa/MN/WI/NE/IL with the requisite tools and skill sets needed to do this sort of thing?

Just wondering...

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Senior Contributor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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I use 3 different butchers/processors and they are an average of 23 miles away. Plenty more around  and a few even closer but I like who I like. Normally you need to book at least a month in advance for your spots , sometimes it is out 4 months.  

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Senior Contributor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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I think all of you guys have given me my answer for the availability of local livestock slaughtering/preparation, etc, but you have also thrown in a variable that I had not considered.

Using the military’s “Time-Space-Logistics template,” there appears to be ample logistical services (professional, skilled worker, tools, and facilities) to do the job. The services in the midwest also seem within reasonable driving distances (space) for delivery of the animal.

What I had not counted on was what seems like an extraordinary amount of time waiting for the pro to complete his job. If you have to wait months in good times for the local butcher to do his job, then I can only imagine how bad it might become if the major wholesale packing houses were ever to all close down at once. Time is the bottleneck.

Thanks again,

Packard

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Senior Advisor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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Tough in IN.

A lot more old time butcher outfits in MI, for some reason.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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I use 3 different butchers/processors and they are an average of 23 miles away. Plenty more around  and a few even closer but I like who I like. Normally you need to book at least a month in advance for your spots , sometimes it is out 4 months.  

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Senior Contributor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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SD,

So you are thinking that if all of these major slaughter facilities were to close due to the Coronavirus, the ability for a single farm family to get the odd cow or pig processed and prepared is not really all that big a deal. Said another way, there are plenty of small scale “start to finish” meat processing professionals in your area who can easily do the job.

Do I have that right?

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Senior Contributor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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RJ,

Thanks. This information was helpful.

Packard

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Advisor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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Our neighbors from back home had 4000 280# finishers shot and hauled away on Friday. People who drove by said the windrows were taller than the trucks.  7000 scheduled for people we know well this week. 

Not enough locker facilities within 100 miles to make a scratch. 

I’d expect that there are many people willing to take a critter, go into the woods or a shed somewhere with knives, saws and garbage bags and get to dressing and butchering best as they can.  A little waste just becomes that much offal to bury or leave for the buzzards and coyotes. I can think of no end of guys who’d pitch in on that, with time on their hands. But that just a scratch as well. 

Papers up here last week said 200,000 or more slated in MN alone. 

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Senior Advisor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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Even back in '98 when they'd throw in a bag of feed if you'd take the darn hog, everybody thought they'd take advantage of that.

Except it was about a 3 month wait to get a slot.

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Senior Advisor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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If my freezer wasn't already full I'd take one and cut it up for my dog.

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Advisor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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Called yesterday to get a slot for 3 of the Berkshires our a friend couple of hrs away raises outdoors in mud holes. ....16th of September. 

Freezer we’ll stocked here as well but no shortage of neighbors and relatives who will take it.  

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Senior Contributor

Re: Hey BA! Another amateur Ag question for you.

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I think all of you guys have given me my answer for the availability of local livestock slaughtering/preparation, etc, but you have also thrown in a variable that I had not considered.

Using the military’s “Time-Space-Logistics template,” there appears to be ample logistical services (professional, skilled worker, tools, and facilities) to do the job. The services in the midwest also seem within reasonable driving distances (space) for delivery of the animal.

What I had not counted on was what seems like an extraordinary amount of time waiting for the pro to complete his job. If you have to wait months in good times for the local butcher to do his job, then I can only imagine how bad it might become if the major wholesale packing houses were ever to all close down at once. Time is the bottleneck.

Thanks again,

Packard

View solution in original post

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