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Jim Meade / Iowa City
Senior Advisor

Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

Studies show that various farming practices improve water quality.  Does that make you eager to run out and change the way you farm so the guy downstream has better water?  Even if you don't make any money at it?  Even if it costs you money?

 

Or do you figure this study will give the activists fodder to push for REQUIRING that voluntary practices be complied with?

 

https://www.iowafarmbureau.com/Article/Study-shows-farmers-efforts-can-improve-water-quality

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8 Replies
NewAgJudge
Senior Contributor

Re: Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

 

 

Did you really type that ?  On purpose ?

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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

I can't imagine improving on water. 

It is very public knowledge that sweeteners are not working...

 

Maybe we could just bottle it and carry it to the next farmer down stream, but no, let's just let it run down through the grass and field mice to keep it as it was in olden days.. soooooo  "fresh and natural".

 

 

Jim why do you want to carry a target on your back?  Smiley Happy

 

 

 

 

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ncwinn54
Frequent Contributor

Re: Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

You need only look at the hog industry in NC, to see an example, in bold type and capital letters, of how voluntary BMPs morph into regulatory permit parameters.  Also, look into the Neuse Rules, for crops.  Welcome to my world.

 

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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

parallysis by regulation.

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Kay/NC
Honored Advisor

Re: Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

Intriguing legally, as the activists are now suing the DEQ in NC, for not keeping us out of environmental racism situations. Here we are, the most regulated hog sector in America, and now it boils down to where we are sited, relative to people of color. The fact that there are people of color everywhere, except inside the gated communities within the Raleigh Beltline, for the most part, is apparently irrelevant.
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k-289
Senior Advisor

Re: Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

If  producers in North Carolina assume this issue is going away any time soon - they probably need to re-evaluate it.  MILLIONS of gallons is some what of a HEADLINE being the issue which the EXPERTS failed to reconize from the start of these ventures . Just saying  -  it was once quoted  '' my rights start & end at my property boarder line '' which is quite interesting thought .    

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bikinkawboy
Veteran Contributor

Re: Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

Ever heard of "Policing your own ranks?"  All of us live upstream of someone else, meaning what we do effects the water quality for those downstream. 

I don't want you pooping in my drinking water any more than the guy downstream wants me pooping in his drinking water.  So yes, we all have the responsibility

to do our best to make sure we have as little negative impact on water quality as is possible.  Unfortunately most city folks only see what we do to our water

but fail to realize that in general, they use the same products in their yard as we do in our fields, except that they use far more on a per acre basis.  For years I've

worked wtth school kids enlightening them on water degredation and how we are all part of the problem, not just farmers or factories.

 

Missouri's Department of Natural Resources has been at the forefront with many programs aimed at protecting our soil and water resources.  I've talked with many

of their big wheels and their thinking is that by taking matters into our own hands and doing what's environmentally right, them EPA won't have a leg to stand on

when they want to impose their own version of natural resources protection.  And don't think that EPA won't, just ask any farmer in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

when it comes to them limiting the nutrients entering the bay.  EPA doesn't go after the city people that pour huge amounts of fertilizer on their yards or the golf course

that use huge volumes of fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides, instead it's the everyday farmer that is bearing the brunt of the regulations.  Don't think that I'm some

burned out old hippie because I'm as far from that as is possible, yet I believe it's my responsibility to minimize erosion on my farm and to make sure the water leaving

my farm is as clean as possible.      

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k-289
Senior Advisor

Re: Improving Water Quality - Whose Choice?

Blinka   -  Remember blue grass and the likes of it have the best nitrogen usage ratio's several times more efficent that rowed crops when making comparisons---

 

Vados soil sampling show bare minimums in several tests conducted in several states and locally by our NRD samples- just saying although the mind set of our city folks could be a little exteme ---

 

 

  

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